Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core)
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Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core)
"Figuring out" how to "add" the Common Core to instruction
Curated by Helen Teague
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The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic)

The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic) | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía sobre el proceso socrático. Un saludo

Via Beth Dichter
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Audrey's comment, August 9, 2013 7:31 AM
I agree Teri. It encourages reading and encourages students to be in charge of their learning.
Audrey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:39 AM

Using the Socratic process the educator is a tutor.  The process  encourages evaluative and analytical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:55 PM

This is an easy and yet thorough infographic.

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12 Principles of Modern Learning | #ModernEDU 

12 Principles of Modern Learning | #ModernEDU  | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/a-holistic-view-of-what-will-influence-education-in-the-future/

 


Via Gust MEES
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12 Principles of Modern Learning
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 22, 5:13 AM

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/a-holistic-view-of-what-will-influence-education-in-the-future/

 

 

shazia.wj's curator insight, June 22, 9:00 AM
Principles of modern learning 
vgpascal's curator insight, June 23, 2:59 AM
Une déclinaison des compétences pour apprendre à apprendre les habiletés d'un apprenant connecté... aux autres et en ligne.
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Praise Poetry

Praise Poetry | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
A praise poem is a tribute. Praise poetry holds a special place in southern African literature. In Zulu, praise poetry is called izibongo. It refers to

Via Deanna Mascle
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The “On-Demand” Generation

The “On-Demand” Generation | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
By Dan Koch @danvkoch Think about the immediacy of how you consume or obtain information or content. The world hasn't just altered this for you. We are in a fundamentally different time than even ten years ago; a time in which Twitter was a cell phone service and people were still using MySpace. I don't…
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Global initiatives by dedicated teachers, post by Dan Koch
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20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age

20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
What is professional development?  It is pretty much anything that helps one develop professionally. At the heart, professional development is about growth and learning.  In the field of education, it seems like many quickly think of educational opportunities that mimic what they see in their schools. As a result, they turn professional learning and education into schooling.  The problem with that is that schooling is too limiting.  In this age, there are many other exciting and high-impact learning opportunities for teachers that extend beyond traditional notions of schooling.  When we hear the phrase “professional development,” certain practices likely come to mind, things like in-services and conferences. In the digital age, there are countless other opportunities for professional development and restricting one’s thoughts to just a few options limits our insight into what is possible for our students.  With that in mind, here is a brainstorm of 20 options available to educators today. This is far from an exhaustive list, but it is enough to start exploring the possibilities.  Feel free to suggest others in a comment to this post.

 

Learn more:

 

Professional Development: WHY EDUcators And TEACHers Can’t Catch UP THAT Quickly AND How-To Change It

 

LEARNing To LEARN For MY Professional Development | I Did It MY Way

 

 

 


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CECI Jean-François's curator insight, April 26, 3:13 AM

20 scénarios d'accompagnement au développement professionnel de l'enseignant. Des idées très intéressantes et moins documentées y figurent ...

Gilles Le Page's curator insight, April 27, 3:20 AM

c'est en anglais, pas vraiment génial, mais certaines pistes sont bonnes ...

Exemples (traduction libre) :

 

La Conférence virtuelle - Construite sur ​​l'idée de la conférence traditionnelle, ce type de conférence nécessite un dispositif et une connexion Internet. Une conf. virtuelle peut inclure des présentateurs et des participants de partout dans le monde, ils sont souvent peu coûteux ou gratuits, et donnent accès aux idées étonnantes d'autres écoles ou éducateurs. 

Avantage supplémentaire : la plupart des sessions sont enregistrées, et peuvent être partagées avec des collègues. 

Un des meilleurs exemples d'une grande conférence virtuelle gratuite pour éducateurs est toujours la Conférence sur l' éducation mondiale , avec des présentateurs et des participants venus du monde entier, tous axés sur l' éducation dans un contexte mondial. 

 

Le Webinar – chaque jour, il y a des milliers de webinars (en ligne et en direct) de 30 à 90 minutes sur ​ des sujets très variés. Certains sont payant, d'autres sont gratuits. Il est facile de les organiser et facile d'y assister. Ils peuvent être un moyen rapide d'explorer un nouveau sujet. Ils peuvent être suivis seul ou avec un groupe de collègues enseignants dans la même pièce, en prenant le temps de débriefer et discuter ensuite.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, May 28, 3:30 AM
Trop de profs demandent comment continuer à se former pour des domaines non-techniques. Voici quelques pistes.
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Advancing STEM Learning for All: Sharing cutting edge work and community discourse

Join us at http://stemforall2016.videohall.com! On May 17th – 23rd, 2016, more than 150 projects will showcase three-minute videos of their innovative work…
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2016 Video Showcase – Advancing STEM for All May 17-23, 2016 (online) Join us next week for the 2nd annual video showcase! This interactive, online event features more than 400 presenters and co-presenters who have submitted 156 videos on STEM education research & development. Visit the showcase to view, comment, and cast your vote for your favorite videos and projects. All projects featured in the 3-minute videos were funded by NSF and represent cutting-edge research and development in STEM and computer science education.
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Student-Made E-Books: A Beautiful Way to Demonstrate Learning - Cult of Pedagogy

Student-Made E-Books: A Beautiful Way to Demonstrate Learning - Cult of Pedagogy | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
You’ve reached the end of a unit or year, and you want students to demonstrate their learning in a way that requires them to synthesize information, apply it in new ways, and reflect on how they have grown. To achieve any of these goals, an end-of-unit exam doesn’t quite cut it. You could have students do presentations…that’s always an option. But here’s one more: Have students create their own PDF e-books, packaging up some aspect of their learning into a finished digital product they can enjoy and share for years.

Via John Evans
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Internet rallies to cheer up sad PaPaw after grandkids bail on burger night

Internet rallies to cheer up sad PaPaw after grandkids bail on burger night | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
If your grandparent makes you dinner, you better make sure you show up — lest the Internet find out.
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The amazing power of social media and mobile tech... (BTW: call you grandpa/ma)
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5 Soft Skills That Will Upgrade Your Presentations - Cooper on Curriculum

5 Soft Skills That Will Upgrade Your Presentations - Cooper on Curriculum | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Last Sunday, I attended the Tony Sinanis (@TonySinanis) pre-conference keynote for my state’s annual educational technology conference, PETE & C (Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo & Conference). The topic/title of the presentation was “Telling Your School Story.” In general, the focus was school/district branding, communicating with stakeholders, and a look at how social media is changing …
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The Story – Book Bingo Shake up your reading list during...

The Story – Book Bingo Shake up your reading list during... | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Book BingoShake up your reading list during National Reading Month with this fill-in-the-blanks game custom-made for bookworms. Download a bingo card
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for #NationalReadingMonth  Downloadable Book Bingo Card... FUN!!
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Helen Teague's curator insight, March 11, 4:24 PM
for #NationalReadingMonth  Downloadable Book Bingo Card... FUN!!
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Reading prepares students for living and learning outside the text | Johnathan Chase | LinkedIn

Common Core's emphasis on deep analysis of text and discrete literacy skills is misguided and will not improve the college and career readiness of st
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My Favorite Quote: "Reading prepares students for living and learning outside the text." ~Johnathan Chase

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Monk parakeets use mental math to find their place in pecking order

Monk parakeets use mental math to find their place in pecking order | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it

From Stefan Gruenwald

A study of aggression in monk parakeets suggests that where they stand in the pecking order is a function of the bird's carefully calibrated perceptions of the rank of their fellow-feathered friends. Newly formed groups of monk parakeets do not show evidence that they perceive rank, yet an awareness of it emerges quickly, after about a week of interactions, which is when individuals direct aggression more frequently against those nearby in rank rather than with lower-ranked birds.

 

But how do the birds infer rank - their own and the rank of those in the rest of the flock - and then act upon it? "Parakeets appear to be able to connect the dots in their groups, remembering chains of aggression, so if A fights B, then watches how B fights C and how C fights D and how D fights E, then A will use this knowledge to adjust how it interacts with E based on all of the fights in between," said the study's lead author Elizabeth Hobson, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

 

The study published today in the journal PLOS Computational Biology sheds new light on how socially complex animal societies evolve and how dominance hierarchies are established. A socially and cognitively complex species, monk parakeets inhabit a social structure organized by dominance hierarchies, such that each animal is ranked as dominant over animals below it and submissive to those above it in the hierarchy. Aggressive encounters usually drive rankings, and a higher rank, of course, often means better foraging and greater chances of reproductive success.

 

Unlike other animals that might use visual cues, such as size, or perceptional clues, such as spatial location, to determine rank, the monk parakeet appears to rely on other clues - ones that are based on newly acquired social knowledge, the study found.

 

In the study, Hobson and co-author Simon DeDeo of Indiana University and the Santa Fe Institute analyzed detailed observations of aggression in two independent groups of captive monk parakeets. Each group was observed over the course of 24 days. "We looked for cases where we could clearly determine a winner when aggression took place - often these were cases where a bird approached another and knocked it off its perch. It's pretty easy to determine the winner in these kinds of events," Hobson said. A total of 1013 wins in one group and 1360 wins in the second group were analyzed.

 

Mathematically sophisticated computation with this rich dataset then revealed that as individuals begin to interact and watch the fights of others, they accumulate knowledge of who wins in fights against whom. Once this knowledge is present, the birds use it refine their own behavior, for example, by avoiding fights with birds higher-ranked than themselves, but also birds that were much lower-ranked. Instead, they focused their aggression by choosing individuals with whom they might be closely matched. In effect, the aggression becomes more strategically directed.

 

Thus, the ability to determine rank amongst these socially precocious birds appears to be an act of cognitive complexity, learned through the bird's careful observation of how the other birds interact.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Helen Teague's insight:

A study of aggression in monk parakeets suggests that where they stand in the pecking order is a function of the bird's carefully calibrated perceptions of the rank of their fellow-feathered friends. Newly formed groups of monk parakeets do not show evidence that they perceive rank, yet an awareness of it emerges quickly, after about a week of interactions, which is when individuals direct aggression more frequently against those nearby in rank rather than with lower-ranked birds.

 

But how do the birds infer rank - their own and the rank of those in the rest of the flock - and then act upon it? "Parakeets appear to be able to connect the dots in their groups, remembering chains of aggression, so if A fights B, then watches how B fights C and how C fights D and how D fights E, then A will use this knowledge to adjust how it interacts with E based on all of the fights in between," said the study's lead author Elizabeth Hobson, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

 

The study published today in the journal PLOS Computational Biology sheds new light on how socially complex animal societies evolve and how dominance hierarchies are established. A socially and cognitively complex species, monk parakeets inhabit a social structure organized by dominance hierarchies, such that each animal is ranked as dominant over animals below it and submissive to those above it in the hierarchy. Aggressive encounters usually drive rankings, and a higher rank, of course, often means better foraging and greater chances of reproductive success.

 

Unlike other animals that might use visual cues, such as size, or perceptional clues, such as spatial location, to determine rank, the monk parakeet appears to rely on other clues - ones that are based on newly acquired social knowledge, the study found.

 

In the study, Hobson and co-author Simon DeDeo of Indiana University and the Santa Fe Institute analyzed detailed observations of aggression in two independent groups of captive monk parakeets. Each group was observed over the course of 24 days. "We looked for cases where we could clearly determine a winner when aggression took place - often these were cases where a bird approached another and knocked it off its perch. It's pretty easy to determine the winner in these kinds of events," Hobson said. A total of 1013 wins in one group and 1360 wins in the second group were analyzed.

 

Mathematically sophisticated computation with this rich dataset then revealed that as individuals begin to interact and watch the fights of others, they accumulate knowledge of who wins in fights against whom. Once this knowledge is present, the birds use it refine their own behavior, for example, by avoiding fights with birds higher-ranked than themselves, but also birds that were much lower-ranked. Instead, they focused their aggression by choosing individuals with whom they might be closely matched. In effect, the aggression becomes more strategically directed.

 

Thus, the ability to determine rank amongst these socially precocious birds appears to be an act of cognitive complexity, learned through the bird's careful observation of how the other birds interact.

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22 Powerful Alternatives to "You're Smart!" - Brilliant or Insane @AngelaStockman

22 Powerful Alternatives to "You're Smart!" - Brilliant or Insane @AngelaStockman | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Much has been written about the detriments of praise in recent years, particularly the kind that focuses on inherent intelligence.

It was Carol Dweck who inspired me to consider the unintended consequences of over-celebrating my students’ smarts, and as this conversation continues within and beyond the field of education, everyone seems to be a bit more sensitive when it comes to reinforcing learners.

Wondering how you can motivate and inspire in ways that build confidence, stamina, and perseverance? Take a few of these statements for a test drive.

Via John Evans, Miloš Bajčetić
Helen Teague's insight:

this is a practical way to relate SuperResearcher Carol Dweck's advice against over-celebrating. (And it's great!! ... just kidding)

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How to Use Padlet: A Fantastic Tool for Teaching

How to Use Padlet: A Fantastic Tool for Teaching | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Padlet is a fantastic tool to use in the classroom. This classroom how-to guide for Padlet will get you started creating pages and using it with students.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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John O'Connor's curator insight, July 12, 6:57 PM
Padlet is an evergreen in a changing edtech world.
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8 digital skills we must teach our children | #DQ #DigitalQuotient #EQ #EmotionalQuotient

8 digital skills we must teach our children | #DQ #DigitalQuotient #EQ #EmotionalQuotient | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
The digital world is a vast expanse of learning and entertainment. But it is in this digital world that kids are also exposed to many risks, such as cyberbullying, technology addiction, obscene and violent content, radicalization, scams and data theft. The problem lies in the fast and ever evolving nature of the digital world, where proper internet governance and policies for child protection are slow to catch up, rendering them ineffective.

Moreover, there is the digital age gap. The way children use technology is very different from adults. This gap makes it difficult for parents and educators to fully understand the risks and threats that children could face online. As a result, adults may feel unable to advise children on the safe and responsible use of digital technologies. Likewise, this gap gives rise to different perspectives of what is considered acceptable behaviour.

So how can we, as parents, educators and leaders, prepare our children for the digital age? Without a doubt, it is critical for us to equip them with digital intelligence.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

http://www.dqproject.org/

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Helen Teague's insight:
Good list--are there additional skills to add?
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Julie Wedgwood's curator insight, June 22, 3:15 PM
It's not just children that need these skills.  We al need them.  
Sandra Guerra's curator insight, June 22, 11:44 PM

How to help our children and students develop a digital intelligence. 

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, June 24, 3:15 AM
Le monde digital se développe sous nos yeux ! Il faut apprendre à vivre avec.
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A professor takes his classes on a walk (essay)

A professor takes his classes on a walk (essay) | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Literally walking side by side with students while teaching a class can bring unexpected benefits, writes Del Doughty.
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Pedestrian Pedagogy by Del Doughty. "Walking and reading at the same time is second nature to students who were raised with phones in their hands."
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How Workforce Needs Will Create the Higher Education System of the Future

How Workforce Needs Will Create the Higher Education System of the Future | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
The shift in postsecondary credentialing and the needs of the 21st-century workforce will revolutionize higher education. Colleges and universities have vast potential to be positive agents of this change.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 24, 1:12 AM

Interesting.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 16, 12:57 PM
Interesting article. 
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Personalize Learning: Making the Shift to "Our" Classroom

Personalize Learning: Making the Shift to "Our" Classroom | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Brian Anton, high school social studies teacher, shares how he had to change so his learners could drive their learning.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
Helen Teague's insight:
Kathleen McClaskey's insight: Brian shares how he transformed his classroom to a learner-centered environment and what happened in the process with his learners. Here is a glimpse of his journey: "As teachers, it is difficult to let go of control and to let our learners find the best ways for them to achieve content and curriculum goals. To be clear, our role in the classroom needs to change, and I think the trend in education is moving the correct direction--achieving and creating a learner-driven, personalized atmosphere is the key. Providing learners with the tools to succeed should be the goal, and we should focus on allowing them to use those tools in the way that works best individually. Instead of providing the blueprint for learners to achieve a goal, educators should be allowing and guiding them in designing, developing, and implementing their plan for accomplishing it. When this happens, drastic changes take place regarding engagement in our classrooms and ownership of learning appears, leading to a higher level of achievement."
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 14, 10:15 AM
Sharing the classroom is important for student and teacher voice to emerge. Taking it one step further, what if teacher voice were encouraged in schools?
Gust MEES's curator insight, May 14, 9:16 PM

One of the most difficult parts of our jobs as educators is to create a learning environment where our learners are engaged and meet content and curriculum goals. From my experience, the single most important challenge that needs to be addressed to earn engagement in our classrooms is to develop a culture of learner autonomy--allowing and encouraging learners to take control of their own learning. There are many barriers that we, as educators, must work to clear in order to create a strong culture that allows our learners to feel comfortable with working toward a common goal in the way that works best for them.


- See more at: http://www.personalizelearning.com/2016/02/making-shift-to-our-classroom.html#sthash.Fe2mNysX.dpuf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/27/what-are-the-best-ways-of-teaching-and-learning-ideas-and-reflections/

 

Robert Dart's curator insight, May 15, 8:19 PM
Must investigate further
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Personalize Learning: Continuum of Voice: What it Means for the Learner

Personalize Learning: Continuum of Voice: What it Means for the Learner | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Examples and ideas that illustrate the Continuum of Voice moving to agency through the Stages of Personalized Learning Environments.

Via juandoming, John Evans
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Katharina Windisch's curator insight, January 19, 3:06 PM

Interesting brief insight about how important it is for children to be able to express their opinions and to what this possibility leads - a more studentcentred learning environment.

Sergio Avalos's curator insight, May 9, 2:39 PM
sergio avalos
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, May 9, 10:08 PM
Excellent visual for engaging students and empowering them to develop a personal voice and agency.
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5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes

5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it

The average person has 70,000 thoughts each day, and if you don’t learn to organize them, they have the potential to wreak havoc on your productivity.

 

When you succumb to the flurry of thoughts running through your head, your mind becomes disorganized, and the more you ruminate on intrusive thoughts, the more power you give them.

Most of our thoughts are just that—thoughts, not facts. When you find yourself believing the negative, distracting, and pessimistic things your inner voice says, it’s very hard to slow down the momentum of your thoughts.


Via The Learning Factor
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 20, 8:54 PM
Gives a new meaning to staying focused...
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 20, 11:40 PM
One has an average of 70,000 thoughts in a day, and to handle all of them is a challenge indeed! In the context of the busy and hectic lives we lead, it is important to be in the flow, as being overwhelmed by thoughts and issues can add up to stress. While it is difficult to slow down time one can atleast try to organise the flow of thoughts. This is an interesting write-up that will help you organise yourself in these hectic and busy times. Organising thoughts in a to-do diary will help a great deal!
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 21, 7:09 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Launching students towards source-based writing

This article from the College and Research Library News describes a librarian's discourse with students in a library instruction session. The librarian speaks directly to students in a conversational tone, invites them to think of academic writing as a conversation and suggests there are several fundamental “moves” scholars make when they enter this conversation. The librarian also has an invitational response to the student's question: "What do you want me to do with it?" regarding the new information from the librarian.
Helen Teague's insight:
This article from the College and Research Library News describes a librarian's discourse with students in a library instruction session. The librarian speaks directly to students in a conversational tone, invites them to think of academic writing as a conversation and suggests there are several fundamental “moves” scholars make when they enter this conversation. The librarian also has an invitational response to the student's question: "What do you want me to do with it?" regarding the new information from the librarian.
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The Story – Book Bingo Shake up your reading list during...

The Story – Book Bingo Shake up your reading list during... | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Book BingoShake up your reading list during National Reading Month with this fill-in-the-blanks game custom-made for bookworms. Download a bingo card
Helen Teague's insight:
for #NationalReadingMonth  Downloadable Book Bingo Card... FUN!!
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Helen Teague's curator insight, March 11, 4:22 PM
for #NationalReadingMonth  Downloadable Book Bingo Card... FUN!!
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60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know

60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, November 18, 2015 11:56 AM

This article lists 60 things students can create to demonstrate understanding. How many of these have you used in your classrooms already?

Richard Whiteside's curator insight, November 20, 2015 5:03 AM

A useful list of possible ways for students to demonstrate understanding. Nothing else, just a list, so a good place to refresh your memory, or get a new idea ver quickly!

Campus Extens - UIB Virtual -'s curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:23 AM

Aquest article ofereix una llista de propostes, i eines digitals per aplicar-les.

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4 Major Types of Educational Leadership | The Edvocate

4 Major Types of Educational Leadership | The Edvocate | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
There are four major styles of leadership which apply well in the educational setting. While each of these styles has its good points, there is a wide berth of
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Succinct summaries of Transformational Leadership, Emotional Leadership, Transactional Leadership, and Servant Leadership in a post by Matthew Lynch on 9/1/15

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Scaffolding definition

Scaffolding definition | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it

"Scaffolding is a teaching approach that moves students progressively toward stronger understanding, skill acquisition, and learning independence ..."

©


Via Leona Ungerer
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A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms

A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms | Instruction & Curriculum (& a bit of Common Core) | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Mark Phillips suggests that a critical piece of student learning is the physical environment of the classroom itself. He offers examples of and resources for turning impersonal spaces into student-friendly havens of learning.
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Classrooms were usually arranged to meet the needs of the custodial staff more than the needs of students.

Post by Mark Phillips

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