Common Core and Literacy
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Implementing Common Core Standards | Georgia Resources

Implementing Common Core Standards | Georgia Resources | Common Core and Literacy | Scoop.it

The Georgia State Department of Education believes that support for teachers is essential in effectively implementing these standards. Several professional video learning sessions are available, along with presentations and other resources.


Via Mel Riddile
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Weaving Debate into the Writing Process | Literacy and the Common Core Standards

Weaving Debate into the Writing Process | Literacy and the Common Core Standards | Common Core and Literacy | Scoop.it
Organized debates are an engaging way to help students discover, explore and organize ideas during the writing process. However, neither my teacher colleagues nor students share my enthusiasm.
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Teaching Students to use Anchor Standard #1: Textual Evidence in the Common Core Classroom

Teaching Students to use Anchor Standard #1: Textual Evidence in the Common Core Classroom | Common Core and Literacy | Scoop.it

Most of the standards revolve around anchor standard 1: Textual evidence. The prototype assessments developed by PARCC have an entire category of questions devoted to students providing textual evidence. PARCC asks the students a question about the text and follows up with a second question that asks the students to identify support for whatever they inferred for the original question. To do this students need explicit and consistent instruction in textual evidence.

 

Textual evidence is the core of argument and analysis. Textual evidence is support lifted directly from text to support inferences, claims, and assertions. Think critically about this. Textual evidence is a student supporting how they know something.  There is a lot of buzz about text dependent questions and requiring students to refer to the text, but isn’t that what good readers do already? This is the opposite of giving a memory text, camouflaged as a reading test. You know the test where kids can’t use their book to complete a reading test. They have to prove that they have memorized the facts and details, then answer knowledge questions about what they read earlier.

 

When you plan instruction this is the first standard that you need to explicitly teach. All of the other standards rely on students being able to actively use the ability to make inferences and find evidence in a text to support these inferences. There are two different types of things that anyone can say after reading a text. One is something that they noticed that was explicit.


Via Roz Linder
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