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7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC] | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

2013 was a year of exploration for brands on social media. From testing Vines to launching Instagram ads, many companies were dabbling in social media efforts across the Web just to see how customers would react.

Now, in 2014, brands are geting serious. They’re using the wealth of data as well as the human connection that social media can provide to develop deeper relationships with customers.

 

Visit the link for more on these seven ways brands are using social media to increase customer loyalty this year.


Via Lauren Moss
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Further highlights statistics of social media consumption and the information behind the choices of online advertisiers

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Francesca Mattonelli's curator insight, May 7, 2014 5:53 AM

Una bella infografica per riassumere i "must" del 2014 

Eyal Levi's curator insight, May 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Here some of the benesits considering social media

David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:21 PM

Thanks to Lauren Moss.

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Rescooped by Katie Muirhead from Digital Distraction
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7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction: Are You Content Fried!

7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction:  Are You Content Fried! | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

This morning I learned a new word for information overload - content fried from a colleague at the Packard Foundation.    It resonated.


Via Beth Kanter, Tracey Holden-Quinn
Katie Muirhead's insight:

I really like the expression 'content-fried' in this article- it is exactly what can happen with too mush exposure to varying media sources! It also goes into the theory of infotention, as discussed in module two, as well as techniques to combat becoming overwhelmed. A very useful article!!!

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Smartphones could act as "mentors in mindfulness," researcher says

Smartphones could act as "mentors in mindfulness," researcher says | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Smartphones, sometimes seen as a distraction, could be the opposite by helping users stay attentive to achieve goals, a U.S. researcher says.

Via Bart Everson
Katie Muirhead's insight:

"Harmony between what we know and what we do"- with all the available information on social media distractions, infotention and mindfulness, I think looking at these sorts of apps is the way forward. Putting down a phone is obviously hard for the vast majority, so why not make the phone work for us?

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BBC - BBC Internet Blog: Digital Overload and the Curation Crossroads

BBC - BBC Internet Blog: Digital Overload and the Curation Crossroads | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Do you participate online and do you see yourself as a curator?


Via Tracey Holden-Quinn
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Though curation is not necessarily synonymous with infotention, the skill to be able to filter through the barrage of online information is obviously a great starting point and will allow for the practice of infotention. With our attention constantly trying to be captured from varying sources, the ability to compartmentalise information is one step closer toward minfulness, and therefore an interesting article to read.

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Stop Breathe & Think

Stop Breathe & Think | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
A simple, fun and free mindfulness and compassion building tool for teens, available for iOS.

Via Bart Everson
Katie Muirhead's insight:

I like this idea for the implementation of modern mindfulness- a meditation app! When our brains are flitting from one thing to the next, it could hardly be a bad thing to be distracted by meditation. Great idea with a simple design, very appropriate to this subject.

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Bart Everson's curator insight, January 18, 2014 5:30 PM

A new meditation app for iPad and iPhone

Ross Louis's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:01 PM

Considering introducing this to college students too, after trying it out with my middle-school, high-school kids.

Rescooped by Katie Muirhead from Is technology and the internet reducing our attention spans?
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Is Social Media Shortening Our Attention Span?

Is Social Media Shortening Our Attention Span? | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
It's probably unfair to blame social media specifically, but I think it's safe to say that the 24/7 media barrage of soundbites we face every day could be taking its toll.

Via Logan Merrell
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This article is interesting as it has quite a negative stance towards social media, that it definitely is reducing our attention spans. It has some interesting techniques that can be related towards mindfulness, including limiting exposure.

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Logan Merrell's curator insight, June 29, 2013 3:25 AM

I'm not sure if social media is to blame specifically but it surely adds to the problem. Social media such as Twitter seems to promote this shortening of thought and attention. Kiisel argues that we should not let the imediacy of the medium dictate the quality of the conversation. In other words we should type in complete sentences and say exactly what we mean even though text messaging has always been about abreviating words.

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The Fallacy of Information Overload | Brian Solis

The Fallacy of Information Overload | Brian Solis | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Excerpted from this article by Brian Solis:

 

"Information overload isn’t a new phenomenon by any means. The sensation of being overwhelmed by information has been linked to every media revolution. With every new innovation and the mass adoption of disruptive technology, the volume of information available to us grows exponentially.

 

With media now so pervasive and portable, information, of any focus, is available, on demand, and more importantly, resides in our hands to create and consume at will. We are, for better or for worse, always on. And this is both part of the problem and part of the solution for how we evolve as individuals and as an information society.

 

Social media has gifted us a new democracy. And with it, the ability to connect to people around the world and create, share, and devour knowledge, entrainment, and irrelevant information at will. It’s as intimidating as it is beautiful.

 

There is a very real human cost of social connectivity. But, the symptoms of information overload are only a reflection of our inability or lack of desire to bring order to our chaos. See, we are the engineers of the media levees that prevent overflow.

 

The challenge lies not in the realization that we are empowered to curate our social streams and relationships, but in the consciousness of what is and what could be. Meaning, that we must first understand that how we’re connecting, consuming, and creating today is either part of the problem or part of the solution. We, and only we, are in control of information overload and everything begins with acceptance.

 

Information overload is a real phenomenon, but it is I believe, by design. It either works for us or against us and it is our choice as to which way the stream flows. To be clear, information overload is a symptom of over consumption and the inability to refine online experiences based on interest and importance.

 

Access to information and people is intoxicating. Creating an online portrait of who we are or who we want others to see is equality alluring. But without direction, governance, and discipline, we are at risk of giving ourselves to the very networks we value rather than managing the platforms to our advantage.

Our participation must be inspired by purpose and parameters. No, we are not obligated to connect with everyone who connects with us. We are obligated to maintain balance in who we are, what we value, and equally the value we invest in the communities in which we participate.


As Clay Shirky once observed, “There’s no such thing as information overload — only filter failure.”
My take? “Information overload is a symptom of our desire to not focus on what’s important.” It’s a choice.


Perhaps said another way, information overload is a symptom of our inability to focus on what’s truly important or relevant to who we are as individuals, professionals, and as human beings..."

 

Read full interesting article here:
http://www.briansolis.com/2012/05/the-fallacy-of-information-overload/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, k3hamilton, Gust MEES, Ann Vega, Tracey Holden-Quinn
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This article is very important as it brings up a more fundamental question when examining the information overload we experience in the digital age. It questions whether this overload is a result of lack of curation, or whether it is in fact a choice and as a society we are actively changing the way we seek to experience media.

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The Future of Mobility [Infographic]

The Future of Mobility [Infographic] | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

An astounding 80 percent of the world’s population now has a mobile phone—and 84 percent is unwilling to go a single day without their phone. About 45 percent of Americans say they can’t go more than a few hours without checking their phones. In 2012 there were five billion mobile phones in the world—1.8 billion of these were smart phones.


Facebook now reaches 76 percent of the smartphone market, and it accounts for 23 percent of total time spent using apps each month.

The next five most used applications are Google apps, and they account for 10 percent of app usage time. One of the latest smartphone trends is that things are getting less touchy but more sensitive. Gestures and other non-tap inputs are on the rise. Casting a sidelong glance, for example, can pause a video. Some apps are being developed that will switch from manual to voice to text to gesture, depending on what you are doing...


Via Lauren Moss
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Seeking to manage our attention and avoid distraction is one thing, but first we need to be aware of where our attention is going. As smartphones are increasingly used, this infographic highlights in just what way we use our phones. 1 in 5 people check their phone every ten minutes... something tells me that the smartphone may be one of the biggest sources of modern distraction!

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Rein Hof's curator insight, July 8, 2013 12:19 PM

Voor een ieder die zich nog afvraagt waarom mobile content belangrijk is.. 

Mobile is dé manier om in cotact te blijven. En of je nu een commercieel bedrijf bent wat graag een product aan de man brengt, of je bent dienstverlener of overheid. Het maakt niet meer uit. Geen mobile ontent, geen engagement. Niet meer boeien en binden. Tja.. Wie kan zich dat nu nog permiteren? 

Christel Binnie's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:09 PM

80 percent of the world’s population now has a mobile phone, and other interesting facts.

sophiedesc's curator insight, July 19, 2013 7:21 AM

Mobile Commerce: 

 

> "Mobile Shopping accounted for 11% of e-commerce in the 4th quarter of 2012 (up from 3% 2 years earlier)."

> Roughly 58% of smartphone users have made purchases on their smartphones.

> These Mobile Shoppers typically use smartphones for 50 to 60% of the Shopping."

Rescooped by Katie Muirhead from Is technology and the internet reducing our attention spans?
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The Attention-Span Myth

The Attention-Span Myth | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Can technology erode something that doesn’t exist?

Via Logan Merrell
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This article is very interesting as it questions whether we need, or even have, longer 'attention spans'. Perhaps being easily distracted is just as natural as being mesmerised, and it is only with the new digital environment that this train of focus is exercised?

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Logan Merrell's curator insight, June 28, 2013 7:51 AM

This article challenges the notion that our attention spans even exist. It argues that attention spans are something we create in our minds only to be used as a measuring stick for an individual. As society's demands on an individual change so does the perception of ones attention span. For example, eras ago it was thought better to be distractible than to be easily mesmerized. In modern times we perceive low attention spans as a sickness that can be treated with medicine. So basically technology does not hurt our attention spans because they don't really exist in the first place.

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Selective Attention | Simply Psychology

Selective Attention | Simply Psychology | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Via Howard Rheingold
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Interesting cognitive psychology information regarding how our brains absorb information. Interesting to consider how our brains filter what we pay attention to, before we discuss what they pay attention to. Not necessarily directly linked to infotention, but an important source of background information.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, June 12, 2014 5:53 PM

"Selective attention" is the concept from cognitive psychology that forms the elementary building block of infotention -- enlisting existing mechanisms that our brains already use to filter incoming information. The research on this goes back to the 1950s. This is a good description in lay language about research into attentional bottlenecks and filters.

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7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC] | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

2013 was a year of exploration for brands on social media. From testing Vines to launching Instagram ads, many companies were dabbling in social media efforts across the Web just to see how customers would react.

Now, in 2014, brands are geting serious. They’re using the wealth of data as well as the human connection that social media can provide to develop deeper relationships with customers.

 

Visit the link for more on these seven ways brands are using social media to increase customer loyalty this year.


Via Lauren Moss
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Further highlights statistics of social media consumption and the information behind the choices of online advertisiers

more...
Francesca Mattonelli's curator insight, May 7, 2014 5:53 AM

Una bella infografica per riassumere i "must" del 2014 

Eyal Levi's curator insight, May 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Here some of the benesits considering social media

David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:21 PM

Thanks to Lauren Moss.

Rescooped by Katie Muirhead from Technological Distraction
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What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains [Epipheo.TV]

Most of us are on the Internet on a daily basis and whether we like it or not, the Internet is affecting us. It changes how we think, how we work, and it eve...

Via Alex Nana-Sinkam
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This short video has a very similar style of 'fast content' to my intended Prezi, and I think it tackles all the relevant information.  I think it is an interesting reflection that a video seems to be able to more clearly explain the topic of online distraction and infotention using the same techniques of rapid 'streams of thought' that it is describing. Very, very helpful!

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Alex Nana-Sinkam's curator insight, February 16, 2014 3:05 PM

I liked this source because it gives an interesting visual to what many attempt to explain via words. Understanding a concept via a different medium can have a pretty different affect on our comprehension--and this video is a good example of that. Beware, watch only if you're prepared to change your mindfulness habits when it comes to web use.

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Multitasking, social media and distraction: Research review

Multitasking, social media and distraction: Research review | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
2013 research review of major studies relating to multitasking and distraction, with an emphasis on young people and social media.

Via Howard Rheingold
Katie Muirhead's insight:

As our lives are becoming increasingly technical, it is not surprising that research into media multitasking is becoming more widespread. This article is particularly authoritative as it has curated relevant university studies. It notes  that "people who chronically multitask show an enormous range of deficits. They're basically terrible at all sorts of cognitive tasks, including multitasking." This comment alone is enough to inspire me to both research this subject matter more, ans strive towards mindfulness myself!!

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, June 25, 2014 7:51 PM

A literature review of the not-yet-very-extensive research (about a dozen studies in this review) on attention and media multitasking.

David McGavock's curator insight, July 24, 2014 3:53 PM

Nice survey of the research on multitasking. We're just getting started...


"Clifford Nass, notes that scholarship has remained firm in the overall assessment: “The research is almost unanimous, which is very rare in social science, and it says that people who chronically multitask show an enormous range of deficits. They’re basically terrible at all sorts of cognitive tasks, including multitasking.” - See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/social-media/multitasking-social-media-distraction-what-does-research-say#sthash.I21dv2wV.dpuf";

Bodil Hernesvold's curator insight, August 6, 2014 2:54 AM

Attention is important. This entry gives an overview of some research that has been done on multitasking.

Rescooped by Katie Muirhead from Multitasking and attention
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Clay Shirky on information overload versus filter failure - Boing Boing

[From Jan. 2010. What's the same, what's different re: multitasking, attention, infotention... besides a few new tools? --harmonygritz] Clay Shirky on information overload versus filter failure - Boing Boing http://bit.ly/oMjozr #socialmedia...


Via George Station
Katie Muirhead's insight:

An interesting talk by Clay Shirky, focusing on the amount of information in the world and available to us. He calls this overwhelming amount 'information-overload', but rather than accepting that it is the readers' problem, it is due to a lack of filter failures. I like the suggestion of the 'post-Gutenburg' economics, in that on the internet there is no economic necessity to filter quality before being published online as it doesn't cost anything.

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Prof tackles tech distractions one student at a time

Prof tackles tech distractions one student at a time | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
David Levy's University of Washington course has students meditating and mono-tasking in order to help them take the upper hand in the growing global issue of tech distraction

Via Bart Everson
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This professor seems to have identified the issue if technological distractions and has actually implemented a seemingly very valuable class. Maybe this is the way that we, as a society achieve modern mindfulness- by having it taught through institutions. I think it is important to strive towards mindfulness oneself, though a bit of guided time management for the technological age could be incredibly valuable!

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Bart Everson's curator insight, April 20, 2014 1:50 PM

A class on "Information and Contemplation" from the incomparable David Levy!

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, April 21, 2014 12:56 AM

Bravo Prof David Levy! You helped me and I know you will help others

mindful practice while using tech

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I Dare You To Watch This Entire Video - YouTube

"Can you make it through the whole thing?"


Via Howard Rheingold
Katie Muirhead's insight:

I admit, I couldn't make it. Probably the best example of how our attentions bounces around!

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Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:09 PM

Must see! ;-)

David Stewart's curator insight, November 5, 2014 11:56 AM

OK it's not impossible but there is some wisdom there. On the upside, for some reason the YouTube player speaks french

Linda Weeks's curator insight, May 1, 8:52 AM

Challenging

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Infographic: Does Social Media Kill Productivity? | Economy Watch

Infographic: Does Social Media Kill Productivity? | Economy Watch | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
For all its merits, social media distractions costs the American economy $650 billion in productivity losses each year.

Via Rami Kantari
Katie Muirhead's insight:

Another negative article about the loss of productivity from social media distraction. Distraction costs the US economy $650 billion a year- I think that speaks for itself about the extent of the issue.

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Employee Distractions Reaching Epidemic Levels

Employee Distractions Reaching Epidemic Levels | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Even disciplined tech workers can get sidetracked by personal e-mails and social media. Learn how to help your team minimalize workplace distractions.

Via Thomas Faltin
Katie Muirhead's insight:

A great source of statistics about time spent online per day. It is important  to realise not just how often/ how we are distracted, but also  what negative effects it is having on our productivity. Though this article centres on the work place, it can also reflect general loss of productivity in everyday life.

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Mindfulness in Schools: Richard Burnett at TEDxWhitechapel

Stop. Breathe. Pay attention. "Our mental health and well-being are profoundly affected by where and how we place our attention". In this enlightening talk, ...

Via Alex Nana-Sinkam
Katie Muirhead's insight:

"Our mental health and well-being are profoundly affected by where and how we place our attention", a very important video about the importance of mindulfness. Part of my Prezi presentation will be going into the reasons and techniques behind mindfulness, so this will be a very important source.

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Alex Nana-Sinkam's curator insight, February 16, 2014 3:13 PM

Puts a different spin on distraction by highlighting the importance of practicing mindfulness. Stresses the formal education system as a vehicle for teaching mindfulness practices and connects our ability to remain mindful to our ability to pay attention in the digital age. TED vets its speakers pretty well, which already gives Burnett a certain level of trustable mastery over the subject. He's also the co-founder of the Mindfulness in Schools project (mindfulnessinschools.org). 

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Use the Psychology of Focus to Get More Done

Use the Psychology of Focus to Get More Done | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Beware the Illusion of Multitasking Have you ever had one of those days when you felt like you achieved a lot of things, but when you thought about it before a good night’s sleep, you found you’ve actually achieved nothing?


Via Level343, Tracey Holden-Quinn
Katie Muirhead's insight:

The statement "willpower is a limited resource" stood out to me in this article. Try as we might to resist technological distraction, there is only so much effort we can exude before we give in and sign in to Facebook or check our emails! Although this articles refers generally to multitasking, the same techniques can be adopted when considering online information and infotention. The pursuit of focus in this article can be considered a step towards mindfulness.

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How To Format The Perfect Social Media Ads: A 2014 Cheat Sheet (Infographic)

How To Format The Perfect Social Media Ads: A 2014 Cheat Sheet (Infographic) | Technological Distraction, Infotention and Mindfulness | Scoop.it

The number of social networks that offer advertising grows every day and it can get confusing formatting ads for each specific community. In order to get the best ROI on social media ads, your ads not only need quick, smart copy but they also must have well-formatted images optimized to display on mobile and desktop devices.

Take a look at this Social Media Ads Cheat Sheet which features specs for Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and Instagram.


Via Lauren Moss
Katie Muirhead's insight:

This feed is interesting as we see the intentions of online social media advertising from the position of the advertiser. We are shown how (through eye-catching pictures and snappy text) and why (to catch us on our mobile devices) social media advertising is such a growing field. In regards to technological infotention, understanding how we are distracted is the first step to figure out how to avoid distractions.

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peter ingman's curator insight, August 4, 2014 7:59 AM

For all you marketeers out there that need some structure when you are planning your integrated marketing campaign this autumn. Boom!

Leigh Cowan's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:32 PM

These little tip sheets can be real gems when it comes to laying down guidelines, processes and procedures for your #online #advertising.