Colorful Prism Of...
Follow
Find tag "crime"
826 views | +1 today
Colorful Prism Of Racism
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

Facts. #Ferguson #Racism

Facts. #Ferguson #Racism | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it
Facts.
dead-logic:
“ #Ferguson
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

Click to read it all.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Cultural History
Scoop.it!

The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920

The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920 | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it

Pamphlets written by Ida B. Wells-Barnett on the subject of lynching comprise a substantial body of innovative writing, reporting, and analysis in U.S. intellectual history. In the 1890s especially, nascent professional social scientists, media opinion shapers, and leaders in the black community acknowledged and relied on her work.1 Indeed, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's foundational insights into the complex social dynamics behind the lynching for rape scenario have stood the test of time in the more than one hundred years since she penned them; yet her status and recognition as a social critic in the ensuing years has been embattled, to say the least.2 At her death in 1931, for example, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) journal, The Crisis, that her work had been "easily forgotten" and "taken to greater success" by others.3 Wells-Barnett herself complained in a diary of the neglect of "my anti-lynching contribution" in early black history textbooks penned by the influential scholar Carter G. Woodson.4 This essay suggests that rather than comprising a "forgotten" body work, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's pamphlet writings were appropriated and transformed by peers and colleagues in social reform. In turn, they marginalized her as author and leader.

Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

more...
Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, July 16, 6:59 PM

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Masculinity, Bullying and the Locker Room

Masculinity, Bullying and the Locker Room | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it

The Dolphins have indefinitely suspended Incognito for conduct detrimental to the team because his actions [against Martin], if true, are morally abominable and potential violations of workplace laws. Still, there are NFL personnel people and active and former players who believe Martin handled the situation poorly by allowing it to spill out of the locker room and into the public.

That's not to say they're defending Incognito. They're not in any way, shape or form. But they do believe there is an unwritten rule that player business should be handled in the locker room by the players themselves, particularly when the actions are as vile as those attributed to Incognito. "I think Jonathan Martin is a weak person," said one personnel man, speaking on the condition of anonymity. [do I even need to point out the hypocrisy of calling someone weak in character and NOT putting their name on the record?!?]


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

Isn't hiding and keeping the "locker room" mentality exactly what helped abusers like Jerry Sandusky at Penn State?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2013 1:35 PM

This ESPN article and SI article have me thinking about the culture of the locker room and the spaces of machismo that are cultivated there away from the view of the rest of society.  This is a rather important topic to me personally because I was victimized and systematically bullied in the locker room as a kid; I see a connection between what happens at the highest level of sports infusing the images that high school and little league kids aspire to have in their lives.  I was driving home listening to this particular Colin Cowherd radio show and was surprised how much I agreed with what he said.  Much of the backlash on this story has centered on the supposed “wussification of society.”  Sports are that great bastion of hyper-masculinity that rewards behavior that in other social circles would never be culturally unacceptable away from the field of play or the locker room.  Most locker rooms are fine, but expecting them to be self-policying is the type of scenario that bullies actively seek.  I think that those that defend the system’s code of silence fail to realize how they are a part of the system that empowers the bullies to victimize and take advantage of those that prefer more thoughtful, civilized interactions as ways to resolve disputes.  Any comment I’ve heard that has criticized Martin usually ends up tells me more about that commenter than it does to explain the situation. 

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, November 5, 2013 3:13 PM

Isn't hiding and keeping the "locker room" mentality exactly what helped abusers like Jerry Sandusky at Penn State?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:00 PM
In Miami players Incognito and Martin had some locker room differences with one another. Incognito was accused of bullying Martin. Although completely in the wrong the NFL and many other poeple believe that Martin should have confronted him in the locker room or went to the coach. Instead he leaked it to the press and it became a public issue.
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

Who Will Be Seen? | Halifax Media Co-op

Who Will Be Seen? | Halifax Media Co-op | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it

According to Sisters in Spirit, a research, education and policy initiative led by Aboriginal women from 2005 until 2010, there are at least582 missing and murdered Aboriginal women in this country.  

"I would love for the Prime Minister to make a comment about missing and murdered Aboriginal women or to meet some of our parents and our families," says Maloney.  

Nine provinces are supporting the call for an inquiry, but the response from the federal government has been "dead silence," according to Maloney.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Tasers and Drones: Abuse of power in law, justice, and national security
Scoop.it!

Study: White People Support Harsher Criminal Laws If They Think More Black People Are Arrested

Study: White People Support Harsher Criminal Laws If They Think More Black People Are Arrested | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it
Informing white people that African Americans are significantly over-represented in the prison population "may actually bolster support for the very policies that perpetuate the inequality."

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

The missing women you don’t hear about: How the media fails Indigenous communities

The missing women you don’t hear about: How the media fails Indigenous communities | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it
When indigenous women disappear, their cases often get little coverage -- and their identities can be erased
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Herstory
Scoop.it!

Where Tribal Justice Works – Kind Hearted Woman - FRONTLINE

Where Tribal Justice Works – Kind Hearted Woman - FRONTLINE | Colorful Prism Of Racism | Scoop.it

In 2011, a man in northeastern Oregon beat his girlfriend with a gun, using it like a club to strike her in front of their children.

 

Both were members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The federal government, which has jurisdiction over major crimes in Indian Country, declined to prosecute.

 

So the tribes stepped in. The man was convicted in their courts and sentenced to 790 days in federal prison.

 

But had the assault happened a week earlier, the case could never have gone to trial.

 

The Umatilla tribes had recently enacted new provisions from a federal law, the Tribal Law and Order Act, that allowed Native American courts to try their own people for felony crimes instead of relying on the federal authorities.

 

Without those provisions, once federal prosecutors declined the case, the woman would have had no other legal recourse.


Via BloodandButter, Deanna Dahlsad
more...
No comment yet.