College student reading habits
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by BeckieJean
Scoop.it!

DAE have a hard time explaining the joy of reading/the bond you have with characters to non recreational readers? : DoesAnybodyElse

DAE have a hard time explaining the joy of reading/the bond you have with characters to non recreational readers? : DoesAnybodyElse | College student reading habits | Scoop.it
Maybe I'm just a nut, but when I read a good book, I do not see words on a page. I am there, beside them, experiencing it all as they experience it. W...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by BeckieJean from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Caution: Reading Can Be Hazardous

Caution: Reading Can Be Hazardous | College student reading habits | Scoop.it

This year, I was a judge for the National Book Awards. A day when I got through only a single book felt like a day of delinquency.


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, December 9, 2013 11:58 AM

9 December 2013

So, I'll start with my favorite paragraph from this article by Charles McGrath. It has little to do with the article's title, at least when taken out of context. But, it does strike at the  heart of my beliefs about what we can and occasionally do learn from fiction.

 

_______________

"... And during the summer doldrums I sometime found myself thinking that I was paying the price for an overly bookish life: that I already knew what little there really was for fiction to teach us. Human beings are flawed and do foolish things, especially when love and money are involved. O.K., I think I’ve got that."

_______________


It's a bit overstated, or should I say understated(?), and to give the author credit, the line was delivered in what must have been an extreme moment of exhaustion in his attempt to judge over 400 books that had been nominated for the National Book Awards.


I flashed back to my "Ah Ha!" moment in my freshman year of college, when I raised my hand in a lecture hall with 149 other freshman enrolled in a unique five trimester Humanities program and asked, "Am I crazy or is every book we're going to read going to be about why we should and how we can be good people?"


I immediately felt that my "Ah Ha!" moment had provided the five professor team and probably a good proportion of my fellow classmates to have a "No Duh!" moment; that I had publicized my having been one of the last people on earth to have "discovered" the common denominator of all great literature.


Though the article does not actually keep the promise made in its title, It does build a steadily increasing momentum towards what I think is its greatest pearl of wisdom. Choosing a single title to be recognized as the best work of fiction is almost a ludicrous endeavor. Starting with the idea of what criteria one can agree to apply evenly across some 400+ titles to a recognition that sometimes the "new" break the pre-existing paradigms in such a way that they often are misjudged rather than honored for having gone where no one else had gone before.


Bob Dylan's Voice...

e.e. cummings' punctuation

Picasso's Cubism

Galileo's "eyes"

Apple computers

Flipped classrooms

photography as art

Ghandhi, Martin Luther King jr, and Nelson Mandela

 

How often is it that it is the disruption of the status quo that moves us forward? And, how often are those disruptions dismissed by the contemporary keepers of the faith only to eventually become the defining moments of progress?

 

This is not to say, as is often the case with disruptive innovation, that the new unseats the classics, but rather that the new often finds it quite a challenge to be invited to the table in its early days.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit


Cynthia Cardenas's curator insight, October 6, 2015 6:41 PM

This article goes into depth about some advice when reading a book. You don't have to read the entire book to get an understanding of what it is trying to say but the author mentions that you do need to read enough to where you are able to know what is going on. He talks about how reading over the years and how she has read so many books in her life time and forcing herself to reading fiction books made her realize that their is no point to fiction books because the plots are not great. He experiences retinal tear and is told that it was the result of her middle age. This article is a part of the New York times and is a scholarly source. The author is a writer for the New York times and and a former deputy editor.

Scooped by BeckieJean
Scoop.it!

Pairing interest, major not always easy for college students - Bloomington Pantagraph

Pairing interest, major not always easy for college students - Bloomington Pantagraph | College student reading habits | Scoop.it
Pairing interest, major not always easy for college students Bloomington Pantagraph Perhaps that shouldn't be surprising considering ACT, the college testing firm, recently reported that nearly two-thirds of the students taking the test choose...
more...
No comment yet.