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Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love

Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love | college and career ready | Scoop.it

he Common Core places new emphasis on the importance of reading and analyzing complex nonfiction and informational texts. ....Read more


Via Connie Wise
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

Posted on July 16, 2013 by Catlin Tucker The Common Core places new emphasis on the importance of reading and analyzing complex nonfiction and informational texts. This has many English teachers feeling like their literature is under attack, but students fall in love with stories. We don’t need to lose our stories in our transition to the Common Core. Each week, I do “story time” with my high school students. They sit on the floor and I read them a children’s story. At the beginning of the year, they think I am nuts. In fact, one students said in his evaluation of the class, “I think story time was the most enjoyable [class routine]. At the beginning of the year I thought it was really weird that we were doing it when we were students in high school, but now I’m really happy that we do it because its a great way to end the class after a long day.” Another student gushed, ”I LOVED story time, it made me feel like I was back in Kindergarten, it was always something I looked forward to at the end of the class!” Clearly, students of all ages love stories. There is nothing in the Common Core that says we have to lose our stories. What has been interesting for me is to change my approach to teaching literature. Now, I ground the stories we read into real world events and issues so students see those connections more visibly. This is a great way to pull in those complex nonfiction pieces and use them to deepen our students understanding of the novels, plays and poetry they read in English. My suggestion is to pair each title you teach with a “nonfiction focus.” For example, when we read To Kill a Mockingbird at the start of the year, I selected the death penalty as our nonfiction focus. I pulled in a variety of digital texts related to the death penalty. We read, analyzed and discussed everything from the morality of killing people to the cost of executing prisoners to racial inequality in the justice system. It definitely encouraged students to think about the Tom Robinson trial in the novel more carefully. The beauty of digital texts is it is easier than ever to connect students with the most updated and relevant information online to introduce a variety of nonfiction and informational texts. When we read The Joy Luck Club, we focused on parenting styles and how cultural norms impact parenting decisions.

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Connie Wise's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:00 PM

"There is nothing in the Common Core that says we have to lose our stories. What has been interesting for me is to change my approach to teaching literature. Now,  I ground the stories we read into real world events and issues so students see those connections more visibly. This is a great way to pull in those complex nonfiction pieces and use them to deepen our students understanding of the novels, plays and poetry they read in English."

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from The DigiTeacher
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How Technology Trends Have Influenced the Classroom

How Technology Trends Have Influenced the Classroom | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Teachers all over America are faced with this challenge of keeping students engaged in the classroom when their world outside of school is one of constant engagement and stimulation. Knowing the world outside of our institutional walls is only one step in addressing modern learning styles. How to act and adjust schools today is the next step in making the classroom of today ready for tomorrow.

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Education and Tech Tools
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Is online education the silver bullet that will kill major global education problems? Or is it a runaway train with gigantic issues of its own–issues far too imposing to be solved in the foreseeable future?

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, May 17, 1:59 PM

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