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Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love

Teach Informational Texts Alongside The Literature You Love | college and career ready | Scoop.it

he Common Core places new emphasis on the importance of reading and analyzing complex nonfiction and informational texts. ....Read more


Via Connie Wise
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

Posted on July 16, 2013 by Catlin Tucker The Common Core places new emphasis on the importance of reading and analyzing complex nonfiction and informational texts. This has many English teachers feeling like their literature is under attack, but students fall in love with stories. We don’t need to lose our stories in our transition to the Common Core. Each week, I do “story time” with my high school students. They sit on the floor and I read them a children’s story. At the beginning of the year, they think I am nuts. In fact, one students said in his evaluation of the class, “I think story time was the most enjoyable [class routine]. At the beginning of the year I thought it was really weird that we were doing it when we were students in high school, but now I’m really happy that we do it because its a great way to end the class after a long day.” Another student gushed, ”I LOVED story time, it made me feel like I was back in Kindergarten, it was always something I looked forward to at the end of the class!” Clearly, students of all ages love stories. There is nothing in the Common Core that says we have to lose our stories. What has been interesting for me is to change my approach to teaching literature. Now, I ground the stories we read into real world events and issues so students see those connections more visibly. This is a great way to pull in those complex nonfiction pieces and use them to deepen our students understanding of the novels, plays and poetry they read in English. My suggestion is to pair each title you teach with a “nonfiction focus.” For example, when we read To Kill a Mockingbird at the start of the year, I selected the death penalty as our nonfiction focus. I pulled in a variety of digital texts related to the death penalty. We read, analyzed and discussed everything from the morality of killing people to the cost of executing prisoners to racial inequality in the justice system. It definitely encouraged students to think about the Tom Robinson trial in the novel more carefully. The beauty of digital texts is it is easier than ever to connect students with the most updated and relevant information online to introduce a variety of nonfiction and informational texts. When we read The Joy Luck Club, we focused on parenting styles and how cultural norms impact parenting decisions.

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Connie Wise's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:00 PM

"There is nothing in the Common Core that says we have to lose our stories. What has been interesting for me is to change my approach to teaching literature. Now,  I ground the stories we read into real world events and issues so students see those connections more visibly. This is a great way to pull in those complex nonfiction pieces and use them to deepen our students understanding of the novels, plays and poetry they read in English."

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know...

Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know... | college and career ready | Scoop.it

So here is my list of what I want all new teachers to know:

 

1) - It's Ok to look and feel like this. If being scared wasn't supposed to happen from time to time, then we wouldn't be human. Don't be afraid of what you don't know and aren't sure about. Take everything in stride and accept that you are going to make mistakes. The key is making sure you learn from those mistakes.

2) - Find time during your off period to go observe other classrooms in your building. Even if the content and/or age group are different, there is still a lot you can learn via simple observation. If possible, see if that teacher would be willing to sit and talk with you about what you saw in their classroom. Even better, invite them to observe your classroom and get feedback/input on what they saw in your classroom.

3) - Focus on building relationships with your students from day one. Don't worry about your content at first, you most likely just spent the last four years of your life learning about it. Spend the first few weeks learning about the lives of the students you have in front of you. The more you learn about your students the more they will learn about your content.

4) - Don't worry about discipline and punishing kids; worry about how to provide strong instruction and an engaging classroom environment. This is basically being proactive rather than reactive. A classroom that is engaging with strong instructional practices is a classroom with few discipline problems.

5) - Learn the names and show the utmost respect to every administrative assistant, custodial/maintenance and food service employee in your building. They will help you more than you could ever imagine... trust me on this.

6) - Don't be afraid to speak up and share an idea. You most likely weren't hired because you were the worst candidate, so at some point in time somebody saw something great about you. You bring a new perspective and a fresh set of lenses to the table, so be sure to share your thoughts and insights in a collaborative and collegial manner.

7) - Don't try to do everything on your own. Don't simply shut your door and teach. Work with those who have more experience and know the system. Find a few people whom you can trust, and lean on them.

8) - Be careful of the teacher's lounge and watch out for 'that group.' The teacher's lounge can be the type of environment that just beats you down and makes you feel like the world is a terrible place. This is not always the case, but be aware that these black holes do exist from time to time. Also, every school has 'the group.' You might not notice the group at first because they are always looking for new members (specifically new teachers). Try to avoid this group at all costs.

9) - Having fun on the weekends is all good and is frankly healthy, but be sure to keep your image clean and professional. More employees get in trouble for the silly and not so smart things they do online than for most other reasons. Be safe and have a healthy career/life balance, but don't feel the need to take a picture of every second and then share those pictures with the world.

10) - Get connected and follow the #ntchat hashtag. There is whole world full of resources and information out there, so don't feel limited to just the colleagues in your hallway, in your school and in your district. Reach out and take control of your own learning and development.

What would you add to this list?


Via Sharrock
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 27, 8:06 PM

Much of this is the same advice I had received many years ago preparing to become a new teacher (in an education program).

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 10:22 PM

It is not just new teachers who benefit from building relationships with students, colleagues, and people outside their work.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading
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A clarification of the goal of transfer and how it relates to testing

A clarification of the goal of transfer and how it relates to testing | college and career ready | Scoop.it

What does it mean when we say students need to be able to "tranfer" their learning? Grant Wiggins explores this in the post with a look at what it means to "know" something as opposed to "understand" and/or "apply" a specific piece of knowledge. Using the Pythagoreum Theorum as the example he walks us through these concepts and how they require students "to realize which specific prior learning is called for and apply it."

He also states "If you can only recall and state something you don't really understand it...(you need) a Meaning Goal...and...(a) Transfer..." 
A great read. 


Via Beth Dichter, Melissa Mainiero
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Close Readers Make Big Money

Close Readers Make Big Money | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Via Tracee Orman, Jennie Joseph
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Tracee Orman's curator insight, March 17, 9:32 PM

Close readers make big money...

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core State Standards for School Leaders
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Close Reading: Students Mine Texts For 'Evidence' in #CommonCore Classes

Close Reading: Students Mine Texts For 'Evidence' in #CommonCore Classes | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"She likes the Core because it pushes students to use factual evidence to support their ideas — a practice she’s promoted for years in Vermont schools through the Vermont Writing Collaborative."


Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core State Standards for School Leaders
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Close reading: A revolution delayed

Close reading: A revolution delayed | college and career ready | Scoop.it
For all of the talk about how different reading instruction is meant to be in the Common Core era, and for all of the hand wringing over the critical “instructional shifts” embedded in the new literacy standards, a glimpse at the world of classroom implementation reveals that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Close Reading Requires Student Effort

Close Reading Requires Student Effort | college and career ready | Scoop.it
To meet the Common Core ELA Standards students must "readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works or literature." The purpose of c...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:30 PM

With Common  Core testing approaching close reading in an area that we know students will need to know well. This post provides many resources.

Are you looking for resources on the basic components of close reading? Find links to information on complex short text, pre-reading activities, re-reading of text, annotations, text-dependent questions, peer collaboration and response to text. Check out a visual on text complexity, one on annotation techniques and one on text-dependent questions.

Additional materials are also available.

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, December 7, 2013 9:05 AM

Thik this is a very interesting dilemma long form read alongside skimmers, wasn't scanr eading always part of a good student's skill set. Will need to read this carefully.

David Baker's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:33 AM

Just went to the blog post and it is a rich resource.  I will be adding it to my seminar follow up.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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Report Backs Computer-Based Testing for Students

Report Backs Computer-Based Testing for Students | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Fourth graders can adequately demonstrate their writing ability on computer-based tests, says a new study by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, clearing the way for more testing in technological formats and raising questions about an uneven playing field for students.

Via Mel Riddile, Les Howard
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 10:37 AM
  • Fourth graders can adequately demonstrate their writing ability on computer-based tests.
  • Students in wealthier districts handle computer-based testing with greater ease than pupils in poor districts.
  • "There is an advantage for the child who word-processes every single day versus the child who uses a computer once a week in computer lab,"
  • the utilization of computers for testing by states will continue to accelerate with the implementation of Common Core aligned assessments
  • 33 states were using some form of online testing
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Disciplinary Literacy
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Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahom...

Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahom... | college and career ready | Scoop.it
“Close Reading Infographic on Common Core Oklahoma curated by Connie Wise (Close Reading Infographic | @scoopit via @dgburris http://t.co/sUYecW0wKx #ccss)...” (Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahoma http://t.co/KqRXvFDDAG...

Via Susan Gum
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Susan Gum's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:21 AM

Awesome graphic depicting Close Reading!

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Disciplinary Literacy
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5 skills students need to succeed on common core tests

5 skills students need to succeed on common core tests | college and career ready | Scoop.it

develop reading stamina.transfer close reading skills from paper to the computer screen.answer text dependent questions.identify textual evidence to support answers.practice navigating the tools embedded into the computerized exam.


Via Mel Riddile, Susan Gum
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Mark Gillingham's curator insight, February 4, 4:14 PM

Teachers need help finding appropriate materials for their students, who need to be steeped in a culture of reading across disciplines. 

Susan Gum's curator insight, February 5, 7:56 AM

Very simply put!

Amanda Coler-Pierce's curator insight, March 21, 5:36 PM
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A School That Ditches All the Rules, But Not the Rigor by Tina Barseghian

A School That Ditches All the Rules, But Not the Rigor by Tina Barseghian | college and career ready | Scoop.it
How we will learn


A School That Ditches All the Rules, But Not the Rigor
Tina Barseghian | July 9, 2014
PlayMaker School

How can we make school a joyful ex…
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Could the Same Genes Shape Math Skills As Reading Ability?

About half the genetic contribution to a child's reading ability also shapes how math-savvy she is, a big study of twins finds. But there's still no telling exactly which genes are involved.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Thesis: disciplinary writing
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The Variance Amongst the Results of Readability Formulas Regarding U.S. History Textbooks

Masters thesis


Via Kath Lok
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Thinking Thoughts
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Evidence suggests babies in womb start learning earlier than thought: study - Reuters

Chinatopix Evidence suggests babies in womb start learning earlier than thought: study Reuters (Reuters) - Babies in the womb show evidence of learning by their 34th week, three weeks earlier than previously thought, new research has found.


Via karenpinney
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work...

Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work... | college and career ready | Scoop.it

A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educación Virtual UNET curated by Jaime Salcedo Luna (A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~...

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 10:20 PM

Skills, attitudes, and attributes come closest to what students need to learn. The learning that can be taken forward has to be grounded in concrete work being done by students which is meaningful in their immediate lives. Some of the skills on the list are less important than others and gain in importance over time. A key consideration is how to make them relevant in students' immediate work. What do administrative and clerical skills mean to a student?

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading
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Planning to Meet CCSS Grade Level Literacy Standards

Planning to Meet CCSS Grade Level Literacy Standards | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Do any of those questions sound familiar? I spent this week with some fabulous teachers working on the Iowa Core Writing Standards. Did we work on all of them? No! Did we talk about all of them?...


Via Darren Burris, Mary Clark, Kim Muncie, Robinson Elementary School
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Mary Clark's curator insight, August 5, 2013 11:15 AM

A teacher thinking aloud about CCSS implementation.  Sharing this blog post to show how ELA teachers are working with the standards.

ratzelster's curator insight, August 8, 2013 1:23 PM

Overwhelming???  Maybe.  But there are ways in which to consider this in small enough size pieces that make sense.

Wendi Pillars's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:32 PM

Lots of good links on this sight, also.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading Strategies
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Common Core Implementation Made Simple | Burkins & Yaris

Common Core Implementation Made Simple | Burkins & Yaris | college and career ready | Scoop.it
From writing the reading standards in haiku to creating videos to explain academic vocabulary and the role of connections in a Common Core classroom, when it comes to the Common Core, we have given ourselves some ...

Via Stacey Modungo
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Digital Annotation Tools For Close Reading

Digital Annotation Tools For Close Reading | college and career ready | Scoop.it