college and caree...
Follow
Find
7.8K views | +4 today
 

From around the web

college and career ready
CCR tools, standards, perspectives, indicators, solutions, concerns
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
Scoop.it!

Stuckey in Second: Close Reading with Oreos

Stuckey in Second: Close Reading with Oreos | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Close Reading with Oreos

 


What a fun day! My team and I heard about this awesome OREO cookie lesson from the third grade teachers at our school and of course, since it involved OREOs, we had to try it!! It was just one of those awesome lessons, better than I thought it would be. It made my whole day! (Even if the kids had been eating Oreos!)


Here is the actual lesson that I found online: Close Reading Activity: An Introduction to Close Reading

Here is how it went in my room today!!!

 
 First, I passed out one cookie to each student. I did it in kind of a rushed way (on purpose) and told them to eat it AS SOON AS THEY GET IT. ("What!? Eat it before everyone else has one? This is weird...." All real comments.) By the time I was done passing them out, a few kids had finished their cookies. My plan was working perfectly. I encouraged a few kids to "Hurry, finish it up, we have to move on."
After some weird looks from the kids (Did I mention this was at 9:45 in the morning?) I had them all take out a Post-It note and a pencil. I asked them to write down what they just ate. ("Uh...okay...Mrs. Stuckey is losing it..." again, real comments.) A lot of the kids looked at me like I was asking a trick question, they were trying to write a complete sentence and use capitals and periods just to tell me they ate an Oreo. It was actually comical. Then I asked them to share with me what they ate, here were the responses:


Obviously, their responses were Oreo cookie, oreo, and one kid actually said Vanilla Wafer (gotta love it!) I didn't record that on the anchor chart because she was so embarrassed that she wrote that. But later, her mistake would be perfect for teaching the lesson.

Next, I passed out ANOTHER Oreo (could it be true!?), but I told them this time they could NOT eat the Oreo! I had them come down to the carpet with their Oreo cookie and I explained to them what they were going to do next.

Look at the cookie carefully.Smell the cookie.Think about the cookie.Eat the cookie VERY slowly with your eyes closed, thinking about every bite you take.Think about the texture and the taste of the cookie while you are eating.
What happened next was quite comical because they were literally SAVORING these cookies. I took a few pictures of them eating them with their eyes closed and I SO wish I could share them with you, but I won't.

When they finished, we did our "second read" of the Oreo. I had the categories in red written on the anchor chart (while they were eating). I asked them to describe all of the parts listed. They couldn't stop talking! Look at how much they had to say after their "second read" of the Oreo!


The lesson that we all learned: It's okay to read through something fast the first time (like their first Oreo cookie), but if you do, you can only recall minimal information about it. If you reread it a second time and THINK while you are reading, you can recall a lot more! In fact, it might be smarter to do that the FIRST time!

My little lady that said she ate a Vanilla Wafer...perfect opportunity for my lesson! Sometimes we read through something so fast and with so little thinking that we literally DO NOT KNOW what we read! Right? She ate an Oreo and when she was done, had no idea what she had just eaten...just like our reading sometimes!  They loved it! I loved it! They were excited about Oreos in the morning and asking if we could please do more reading lessons like this one! Ha. I was excited to show them a concrete example of how to Close Read! The rest of the day, we referred to our reading as our "first Oreo" or a "second Oreo." For example: Wait a minute, I didn't understand that. Let me REREAD and think about my Oreo (the text) one more time.

Try it tomorrow! You will love it too! So glad that this activity was introduced to me by some of the other amazing teachers at my school and I just couldn't wait to share it with you all!


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

How to Help Students Develop the Growth Mindset With #20time

How to Help Students Develop the Growth Mindset With #20time | college and career ready | Scoop.it
What students decide to create cannot be graded. No ifs, ands or buts. By not applying a grade to it, students are allowed to fail. They learn the power of failing forward...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Cheryl Frose's curator insight, February 23, 6:19 PM

Definitely going to investigate this further...

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Shift Education
Scoop.it!

Personalised Learning: What's Coming And 10 Trends Every Educator Needs To Know - InformED

Personalised Learning: What's Coming And 10 Trends Every Educator Needs To Know - InformED | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Personalised Learning is the tailoring of pedagogy, curriculum, and learning environment to meet the needs and aspirations of individual learners. In a p

Via Becky Roehrs, Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., Aysin Alp, Dean J. Fusto, Lynnette Van Dyke, Carolyn Wiberg
more...
Becky Roehrs's curator insight, February 8, 8:47 AM

The research sounds good so far, but a lot needs to change in our schools and colleges before we can implement personalized learning Widely.

Carolyn Wiberg's curator insight, February 23, 1:17 PM

"...Momentum will grow for fundamental redesigns of instructional models that incorporate the attributes of personalised learning"

Cited From: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/personalised-learning/#ixzz3Saqk6Lln

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

The Rise Of Personalized Learning

The Rise Of Personalized Learning | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"In the last couple of years a new trend named "Big Data" has become very popular. A large number of start-ups specialize in collection and analysis of huge amounts of data. Large corporations are also not far behind, currently working to establish new departments and teams in order to develop products of this kind. It’s important to understand that the intention is not just to collect large amounts of data, but also to handle it effectively."


Via EDTC@UTB
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
Scoop.it!

How the Common Core Supports Deeper Learning

How the Common Core Supports Deeper Learning | college and career ready | Scoop.it
The change that the Common Core demands from us is considerable, but it's not radical.

Via Les Howard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
Scoop.it!

MDE Latest Update to M-STEP

http://www.mi.gov/documents/mde/Spotlight-2-9-15_480924_7.pdfClick here to edit the title


Via Les Howard
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

First Generation Documentary Film | Official Site | Trailer

First Generation Documentary Film | Official Site | Trailer | college and career ready | Scoop.it
First Generation Documentary Film Official Trailer - Meet the low-income high school students and learn about the issue of college access.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Wiki_Universe
Scoop.it!

A Manual for Flipping Your Classroom | The Innovative Instructor

A Manual for Flipping Your Classroom | The Innovative Instructor | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Via NikolaosKourakos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from High Performance Learning
Scoop.it!

Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math

Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math

Via Adrian Bertolini
more...
Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, February 22, 4:37 PM

One reason I believe math is challenging for so many young people, is because it is so rarely spoken. In school, math instruction focuses on the written component: the constant litany of textbooks, board work and worksheets. At best, students listen to the teacher talk about math—but rarely do they speak it at length themselves.