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http://textproject.org/assets/tds/text-complexity-and-the-ccss/module-3/Module%25203-Beginning%2520and%2520Struggling%2520Readers-Instructor.pdf

http://textproject.org/assets/tds/text-complexity-and-the-ccss/module-3/Module%25203-Beginning%2520and%2520Struggling%2520Readers-Instructor.pdf
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Leading Schools
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98% of US districts unable to make student data "usable information for educators.”

98% of US districts unable to make student data "usable information for educators.” | college and career ready | Scoop.it

98% of US districts lack the “capacity and resources” to turn the “mountains of student data” they collect “into real, usable information for educators.” NCES says that most student data “sit unused in state warehouses.”


Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work...

Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work... | college and career ready | Scoop.it

A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educación Virtual UNET curated by Jaime Salcedo Luna (A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~...

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 10:20 PM

Skills, attitudes, and attributes come closest to what students need to learn. The learning that can be taken forward has to be grounded in concrete work being done by students which is meaningful in their immediate lives. Some of the skills on the list are less important than others and gain in importance over time. A key consideration is how to make them relevant in students' immediate work. What do administrative and clerical skills mean to a student?

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading
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Planning to Meet CCSS Grade Level Literacy Standards

Planning to Meet CCSS Grade Level Literacy Standards | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Do any of those questions sound familiar? I spent this week with some fabulous teachers working on the Iowa Core Writing Standards. Did we work on all of them? No! Did we talk about all of them?...


Via Darren Burris, Mary Clark, Kim Muncie, Robinson Elementary School
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Mary Clark's curator insight, August 5, 2013 11:15 AM

A teacher thinking aloud about CCSS implementation.  Sharing this blog post to show how ELA teachers are working with the standards.

ratzelster's curator insight, August 8, 2013 1:23 PM

Overwhelming???  Maybe.  But there are ways in which to consider this in small enough size pieces that make sense.

Wendi Pillars's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:32 PM

Lots of good links on this sight, also.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading Strategies
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Common Core Implementation Made Simple | Burkins & Yaris

Common Core Implementation Made Simple | Burkins & Yaris | college and career ready | Scoop.it
From writing the reading standards in haiku to creating videos to explain academic vocabulary and the role of connections in a Common Core classroom, when it comes to the Common Core, we have given ourselves some ...

Via Stacey Modungo
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Digital Annotation Tools For Close Reading

Digital Annotation Tools For Close Reading | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"One of the components of Close Reading is annotation, in which the students read short, complex text adding annotations as they read. Students might circle words or phrases that are powerful, underline those that are confusing, indicate big events or when a character shows strong emotion, and write questions or thoughts. They use metacognitive markers or “Thinking Notes” as a means to move beyond just highlighting..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:36 PM

Close Reading covers a wide range of materials: poems, news articles, short stories, plays, photos, paintings,  videos and more. This post provides five tools to help students annotate a wide variety of media. They are listed below, More detailed explanations are found in the post.

* Doctopus - this program is great if you use Google Apps (and therefore Google Drive).

* Diigo is a great tool for annoting text and images found online. Drawing tools are also available.

* Markup does not require an account. "It provides tools for drawing, highlighting, adding text, and sharing via a link. It does require the installation of a bookmarklet or the Chrome extension."

* PDFzen is a free tool that works with Google Drive. It will open the following types of files: pdf, doc, docx, xls, xlx, odt and rtf.

* VideoAnt allows you to annotate  videos hosted on YouTube as well as HTML5 and flash videos and works in a number of browsers.

As we begin to prepare our students for new testing the ability to annotate is critical. These tools provide a variety of options that you may want to explore and use in your classroom.

Lee Hall's curator insight, December 13, 2013 12:34 PM

They can use the mark up tools to help show where they got their text based answers, which is another shift in the common core.

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Top Ten Tips for Close Reading - Infographic & Detailed Tips

Top Ten Tips for Close Reading - Infographic & Detailed Tips | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 29, 9:29 PM

This infographic from SNAP!Learning is one component of this post by Heidi Morgan (a guest poster on a blog by Vicki Davis). It is followed by a detailed explanation of what close reading is as well as a breakdown of each step and how she uses it in her classroom. There is also a great list of additional resources (and right above the list you will find a link to a presentation that is worth watching).

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Common Core might be the most important issue in the 2016 Republican presidential race. Here’s what you need to know about it.

Common Core might be the most important issue in the 2016 Republican presidential race. Here’s what you need to know about it. | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Trying to explain the complex debate surrounding the much talked about policy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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What Are We Talking About When We Talk About Standards?

What Are We Talking About When We Talk About Standards? | college and career ready | Scoop.it
I suspect one of the reasons conversation about Common Core state standards has gotten so very confusing and inflammatory is because so few articles, commentaries, and discussions ever spell out what standards are....

Via Les Howard
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Disciplinary Literacy
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What do Close Reading and Math Have in Common?

#sbRealitweet: How do you track academic operations to monitor the shift to the #CCSS for math instruction? http://t.co/26g6PhjKv6


Via Darren Burris, Rebecca, Susan Gum
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The 4 Levels Of Learning Analytics By Katie Lepi

The 4 Levels Of Learning Analytics By Katie Lepi | college and career ready | Scoop.it
 






The 4 Levels Of Learning Analytics
By Katie Lepi on July 9, 2014



Using data to drive learning outcomes isn’t a new concept, really. For as long as t…
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Biggest influence on a child’s education may be the mother’s education

Biggest influence on a child’s education may be the mother’s education | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Biggest influence on a child’s education may be the mother’s education
Washington Post



By Michael Alison Chandler July 9 at 2:28 PM  

It’s long been known…
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Thesis: disciplinary writing
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Commentary: Help tackling the Common Core | EdNewsColorado

Faced with the not-so-user-friendly new state standards, a literacy coach offers suggestions to daunted teachers.

Via Kath Lok
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Disciplinary literacy
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McREL Blog: Ending the "fire hose" model of PD learning

McREL Blog: Ending the "fire hose" model of PD learning | college and career ready | Scoop.it
As educators, we’ve all experienced sitting through a two- or three-day workshop and, at the end of it, being overwhelmed with information, tired of sitting and listening, and wondering how we’re going to even begin incorporating what we’ve learned into our daily practice at school. We get back to work, and there’s no feedback from anyone and no time to try what we’ve learned. Time slips by, and we make little to no changes in our instructional practices. This style of “learning via fire hose” is one of the least effective, yet all-too-commonly-used formats of professional development in education. A...

Via Laura Jackson
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know...

Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know... | college and career ready | Scoop.it

So here is my list of what I want all new teachers to know:

 

1) - It's Ok to look and feel like this. If being scared wasn't supposed to happen from time to time, then we wouldn't be human. Don't be afraid of what you don't know and aren't sure about. Take everything in stride and accept that you are going to make mistakes. The key is making sure you learn from those mistakes.

2) - Find time during your off period to go observe other classrooms in your building. Even if the content and/or age group are different, there is still a lot you can learn via simple observation. If possible, see if that teacher would be willing to sit and talk with you about what you saw in their classroom. Even better, invite them to observe your classroom and get feedback/input on what they saw in your classroom.

3) - Focus on building relationships with your students from day one. Don't worry about your content at first, you most likely just spent the last four years of your life learning about it. Spend the first few weeks learning about the lives of the students you have in front of you. The more you learn about your students the more they will learn about your content.

4) - Don't worry about discipline and punishing kids; worry about how to provide strong instruction and an engaging classroom environment. This is basically being proactive rather than reactive. A classroom that is engaging with strong instructional practices is a classroom with few discipline problems.

5) - Learn the names and show the utmost respect to every administrative assistant, custodial/maintenance and food service employee in your building. They will help you more than you could ever imagine... trust me on this.

6) - Don't be afraid to speak up and share an idea. You most likely weren't hired because you were the worst candidate, so at some point in time somebody saw something great about you. You bring a new perspective and a fresh set of lenses to the table, so be sure to share your thoughts and insights in a collaborative and collegial manner.

7) - Don't try to do everything on your own. Don't simply shut your door and teach. Work with those who have more experience and know the system. Find a few people whom you can trust, and lean on them.

8) - Be careful of the teacher's lounge and watch out for 'that group.' The teacher's lounge can be the type of environment that just beats you down and makes you feel like the world is a terrible place. This is not always the case, but be aware that these black holes do exist from time to time. Also, every school has 'the group.' You might not notice the group at first because they are always looking for new members (specifically new teachers). Try to avoid this group at all costs.

9) - Having fun on the weekends is all good and is frankly healthy, but be sure to keep your image clean and professional. More employees get in trouble for the silly and not so smart things they do online than for most other reasons. Be safe and have a healthy career/life balance, but don't feel the need to take a picture of every second and then share those pictures with the world.

10) - Get connected and follow the #ntchat hashtag. There is whole world full of resources and information out there, so don't feel limited to just the colleagues in your hallway, in your school and in your district. Reach out and take control of your own learning and development.

What would you add to this list?


Via Sharrock
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 27, 8:06 PM

Much of this is the same advice I had received many years ago preparing to become a new teacher (in an education program).

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 10:22 PM

It is not just new teachers who benefit from building relationships with students, colleagues, and people outside their work.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading
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A clarification of the goal of transfer and how it relates to testing

A clarification of the goal of transfer and how it relates to testing | college and career ready | Scoop.it

What does it mean when we say students need to be able to "tranfer" their learning? Grant Wiggins explores this in the post with a look at what it means to "know" something as opposed to "understand" and/or "apply" a specific piece of knowledge. Using the Pythagoreum Theorum as the example he walks us through these concepts and how they require students "to realize which specific prior learning is called for and apply it."

He also states "If you can only recall and state something you don't really understand it...(you need) a Meaning Goal...and...(a) Transfer..." 
A great read. 


Via Beth Dichter, Melissa Mainiero
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Close Reading
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Close Readers Make Big Money

Close Readers Make Big Money | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Via Tracee Orman, Jennie Joseph
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Tracee Orman's curator insight, March 17, 9:32 PM

Close readers make big money...

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core State Standards for School Leaders
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Close Reading: Students Mine Texts For 'Evidence' in #CommonCore Classes

Close Reading: Students Mine Texts For 'Evidence' in #CommonCore Classes | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"She likes the Core because it pushes students to use factual evidence to support their ideas — a practice she’s promoted for years in Vermont schools through the Vermont Writing Collaborative."


Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core State Standards for School Leaders
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Close reading: A revolution delayed

Close reading: A revolution delayed | college and career ready | Scoop.it
For all of the talk about how different reading instruction is meant to be in the Common Core era, and for all of the hand wringing over the critical “instructional shifts” embedded in the new literacy standards, a glimpse at the world of classroom implementation reveals that the more th