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http://textproject.org/assets/tds/text-complexity-and-the-ccss/module-5/Module%25205-Qualitative%2520Measures-Instructor.pdf

http://textproject.org/assets/tds/text-complexity-and-the-ccss/module-5/Module%25205-Qualitative%2520Measures-Instructor.pdf
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Learning & Mind & Brain
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How Creative Teachers Make Beauty Out Of Chaos - TeachThought

How Creative Teachers Make Beauty Out Of Chaos - TeachThought | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Often the idea of creativity is put in a special box that is limited to only certain kinds of people. This is one of our great myths. I am sure that Albert Einstein, Gandhi, David Bohn, Martha Graham, Wendell Berry, Aristotle, Pablo Picasso, Billie Holiday, Steve Jobs, Vincent Van Gogh, Mozart, Socrates, Leonardo Da Vinci, Martin Luther King, Beethoven, Charles Dickens, Carl Jung, Tesla, Galileo, Thomas Edison, Ben Franklin and Michelangelo all came from different backgrounds, cultures and ways of life. What they did have in common was the ability to see or feel the dynamic interconnectedness of the flow of life.

Via John Evans, Miloš Bajčetić
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Shift Education
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What Is Personalization, Really?

What Is Personalization, Really? | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Personalized learning means student agency, defining curriculum by real-life skills, defining learning expectations, encouraging self-knowledge, and teachers getting to know their students as people.

Via Carolyn Wiberg
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Shift Education
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Moving Beyond Personalized Instruction

The History of the Future of Education Technology

Via Carolyn Wiberg
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Carolyn Wiberg's curator insight, March 3, 6:06 PM

Many fall in to the buzzword trap while many also deliver on more than the general definition of said buzzword, in this case 'personalized learning'. We label and categorize to understand, at some level.  The only way to really change that is to agree that we need deeper engagements to explore the solutions that are out there as I suspect many are more than just the buzzword.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Formative Assessment for Learning
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The Nuts and Bolts of Explicit Modeling

The Nuts and Bolts of Explicit Modeling | college and career ready | Scoop.it
The eight steps of EM include describing the concept or skill, reducing it to critical elements, thinking aloud, teaching with cues, and engaging students' senses.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Les Howard
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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NWEA: Make Assessment Matter

NWEA: Make Assessment Matter | college and career ready | Scoop.it
When the first edition of this study, For Every Child, Multiple Measures, appeared two years ago, the educational landscape was dominated by looming change. The Common Core State Standards had...

Via Les Howard
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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What Assessment System Would Serve Students & Society?

What Assessment System Would Serve Students & Society? | college and career ready | Scoop.it
"From my perspective, using a variety of measures, including some selected at the local school level by educators, families and students,is the best way to capture the broad array of things each school is trying to do."...

Via Les Howard
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills | college and career ready | Scoop.it
We pair 10 photos from The Times that we’ve used in our weekly “What’s Going On in This Picture?” with ideas from students and teachers for how you can use them, or images like them, to teach close reading and visual thinking skills.

Via Les Howard
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pd_vid_conf_ac_2014_kn_susan_drake_tscript.pdf

 Susan Drake keynote on curriculum integration. Queensland

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Oakland County ELA Common Core
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Stuckey in Second: Close Reading with Oreos

Stuckey in Second: Close Reading with Oreos | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Close Reading with Oreos

 


What a fun day! My team and I heard about this awesome OREO cookie lesson from the third grade teachers at our school and of course, since it involved OREOs, we had to try it!! It was just one of those awesome lessons, better than I thought it would be. It made my whole day! (Even if the kids had been eating Oreos!)


Here is the actual lesson that I found online: Close Reading Activity: An Introduction to Close Reading

Here is how it went in my room today!!!

 
 First, I passed out one cookie to each student. I did it in kind of a rushed way (on purpose) and told them to eat it AS SOON AS THEY GET IT. ("What!? Eat it before everyone else has one? This is weird...." All real comments.) By the time I was done passing them out, a few kids had finished their cookies. My plan was working perfectly. I encouraged a few kids to "Hurry, finish it up, we have to move on."
After some weird looks from the kids (Did I mention this was at 9:45 in the morning?) I had them all take out a Post-It note and a pencil. I asked them to write down what they just ate. ("Uh...okay...Mrs. Stuckey is losing it..." again, real comments.) A lot of the kids looked at me like I was asking a trick question, they were trying to write a complete sentence and use capitals and periods just to tell me they ate an Oreo. It was actually comical. Then I asked them to share with me what they ate, here were the responses:


Obviously, their responses were Oreo cookie, oreo, and one kid actually said Vanilla Wafer (gotta love it!) I didn't record that on the anchor chart because she was so embarrassed that she wrote that. But later, her mistake would be perfect for teaching the lesson.

Next, I passed out ANOTHER Oreo (could it be true!?), but I told them this time they could NOT eat the Oreo! I had them come down to the carpet with their Oreo cookie and I explained to them what they were going to do next.

Look at the cookie carefully.Smell the cookie.Think about the cookie.Eat the cookie VERY slowly with your eyes closed, thinking about every bite you take.Think about the texture and the taste of the cookie while you are eating.
What happened next was quite comical because they were literally SAVORING these cookies. I took a few pictures of them eating them with their eyes closed and I SO wish I could share them with you, but I won't.

When they finished, we did our "second read" of the Oreo. I had the categories in red written on the anchor chart (while they were eating). I asked them to describe all of the parts listed. They couldn't stop talking! Look at how much they had to say after their "second read" of the Oreo!


The lesson that we all learned: It's okay to read through something fast the first time (like their first Oreo cookie), but if you do, you can only recall minimal information about it. If you reread it a second time and THINK while you are reading, you can recall a lot more! In fact, it might be smarter to do that the FIRST time!

My little lady that said she ate a Vanilla Wafer...perfect opportunity for my lesson! Sometimes we read through something so fast and with so little thinking that we literally DO NOT KNOW what we read! Right? She ate an Oreo and when she was done, had no idea what she had just eaten...just like our reading sometimes!  They loved it! I loved it! They were excited about Oreos in the morning and asking if we could please do more reading lessons like this one! Ha. I was excited to show them a concrete example of how to Close Read! The rest of the day, we referred to our reading as our "first Oreo" or a "second Oreo." For example: Wait a minute, I didn't understand that. Let me REREAD and think about my Oreo (the text) one more time.

Try it tomorrow! You will love it too! So glad that this activity was introduced to me by some of the other amazing teachers at my school and I just couldn't wait to share it with you all!


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard
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