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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Speedometry – Learn Math and Science | Hot Wheels

Speedometry – Learn Math and Science | Hot Wheels | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"USC Rossier School of Education, in collaboration with the Mattel Children’s Foundation, has launched “Speedometry™,” a free-to-use curriculum that utilizes Hot Wheels® toys to teach elementary-age students science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). “Speedometry” is tailored for children in fourth grade and emphasizes hands-on discovery and learning."

(Quoted from press release from USC Rossier School of Education, http://rossier.usc.edu/usc-rossier-and-mattel-childrens-foundation-launch-innovative-stem-curriculum-for-fourth-graders/)


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:55 AM

Here is a new free program offered through USC Rossier School of Education and the Mattel Children's Foundation that provides a curriculum geared to Grade 4 that will help students engage in STEM. The program is called Speedometry and will have students learning about scientific concepts like velocity, gravity, kinetic energy and more. Most exciting is that you can put in a request for a free kit that will provide:

  • 40 Hot Wheels® diecast cars
  • 16 orange loops
  • 16 track clamps
  • 64 track connectors
  • 100+ feet of orange track

This link will take you the page where you can apply, and you can also download the lesson plans. What a great opportunity!

Aevalle Galicia's curator insight, October 30, 2014 3:23 PM

Okay, so not really math but still an awesome way to get kids interested in math and physics!

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Who Says Top Students Make The Best Employees? - All News Is Global

Who Says Top Students Make The Best Employees? - All News Is Global | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Many people realize well after their school days are behind them that learning can actually be fun. Doing practical math or remembering French words, for example, may suddenly seem easy. Perhaps these folks had bad teachers in those subjects, but it's more likely that newfound learning appreciation has more to do with the fact that there's no longer any pressure.

Read the full article: Who Says Top Students Make The Best Employees? - All News Is Global 
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Via Sharrock
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Sharrock's curator insight, December 12, 2013 11:32 AM

The article seems to be exposing a new, more rigorous hiring assessment. "To ensure a qualified workforce, the company has developed various strategies, among them the new application procedure for the 4,000 young people that it trains every year. The goal is not to find  “the best and the brightest” but rather those whose talents are a good match for their particular job, Weber says. “A sense of responsibility or talent for understanding technical issues can be more important than good or bad grades in math.”

 



Read the full article: Who Says Top Students Make The Best Employees? - All News Is Global 
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Part 4… 23 Formative Digital Resources … A STEM, PBL, Common Core Series

Part 4… 23 Formative Digital Resources …  A STEM, PBL, Common Core Series | college and career ready | Scoop.it

The fourth in a series of five posts on STEM, PBL and the Common Core. Each has a different focus. The previous three posts are also available on this page.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:31 PM

Formative assessments, formative learning, the two go hand in hand. This post explores 23 resources that can be used in STEM classes and for Project Based Learning, Read the post and find resources that will help look at formative assessments in many areas including:

* Activities

* Simulations

* Games

* Reflections

* Journals

* Peer review

* Videos

* Peer and Teacher interaction

* Readings

* Critical and Creative brainstorming and thinking

Ante Lauc's curator insight, June 1, 2013 4:43 AM

I prefer love and freedom and look everything through these criterias.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from technologies
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Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information

Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information | college and career ready | Scoop.it
The Encyclopedia of Life is an unprecedented effort to gather scientific knowledge about all animal and plant life where pictures, information, facts, and mo...

Via John Dalziel
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John Dalziel's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:16 PM

What is EOL? - Information and pictures of all species known to science, it is an Encyclopedia of Life.
Knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere.
EOL's dream is to gather it all together and make it available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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How to Understand the Deep Structures of Language: Scientific American

How to Understand the Deep Structures of Language: Scientific American | college and career ready | Scoop.it
In an alternative to Chomsky’s "Universal Grammar," scientists explore language’s fundamental design constraints

 

and...

 

Starting with pioneering work by Joseph Greenberg, scholars have cataloged over two thousand linguistic universals (facts true of all languages) and biases (facts true of most languages). For instance, in languages with fixed word order, the subject almost always comes before the object. If the verb describes a caused event, the entity that caused the event is the subject ("John broke the vase") not the object (for example, "The vase shbroke John" meaning "John broke the vase"). In languages like English where the verb agrees with one of its subjects or objects, it typically agrees with the subject (compare "the child eats the carrots" with "the children eat the carrots") and not with its object (this would look like "the child eats the carrot" vs. "the child eat the carrots"), though in some languages, like Hungarian, the ending of the verb changes to match both the subject and object. 

 

When I point this out to my students, I usually get blank stares. How else could language work? The answer is: very differently. Scientists and engineers have created hundreds of artificial languages to do the work of mathematics (often called "the universal language"), logic, and computer programming. These languages show none of the features mentioned above for the simplest of reasons: the researchers who invented these languages never bothered to include verb agreement or even the subject/object distinction itself. 


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Let’s Give Girls a Chance to Succeed in STEM

Let’s Give Girls a Chance to Succeed in STEM | college and career ready | Scoop.it
With college-educated women outnumbering college-educated men, why does such inequality plague STEM-based professions? From what I hear in my work as an education technology entrepreneur, an antiquated cultural myth still exists that girls are inherently uncomfortable with computing, math and science.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, February 10, 2013 5:57 PM

It is simply not true that girls are inherently uncomfortable with computing, math and science....stats are reason to worry!