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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens | college and career ready | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

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Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun?

Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun? | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Americans are reading differently than they used to.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 25, 6:57 AM

25 January 2014

 

Generally speaking NPR is one of my "GO TO" resources for reliable  information about "anything." So when I saw this headline in my daily search for scoopable online content, I was intrigued. 

 

Though the PEW Research Center report referenced is a pretty serious and deep and somewhat encouraging report  (see: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update/Overview.aspx) this six-minute audio seemed to cover the surface, but "failed to support the headline." It did not focus upon the implication of the headline that E-Books ARE killing reading for fun.

 

Actually, I'm trying to be a bit snarky here. The audio is worth listening to. It's the headline that bothers me. We all know that we often scan headlines looking for intriguing articles to read. Some do not create enough traction for us to consider reading, others get us to start but not finish reading, and still others get us to the article that is so intriguing that we read with attentive interest to the end.

 

This morning in my scan for articles, my eye was caught by several headlines and I began to wonder about headlines themselves.

 

A few examples, you can Google them all if any of the tiltes intrigue you...

 

BUT BEFORE you start Googling the titles, Try this.

1. Read the entire list of titles FIRST

2. Being mindful of your own initial reaction to the titles, review the titles and decide which you believe

 - will be articles promoting reading and which will be critical of reading.

 - which will support opinions you already hold and which will challenge your existing opinions

- which you will actually consider Googling so you can read them and which don't even create sufficient curiousity to read

- and finally (rhetorically) which will implant some sense that there really is evidence to support your opinions that you won't read but sub-consciously incorporate as proof that your opinion is justified by some authoritative expertise.

 

THEN read as you wish and when finished, which headlines planted biased opinions that might be dangerous if the article is not read at all or not read attentively. (Was the article WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT reliant upon cherry-picking the evidence it relied upon for its conclusions? Did the article adequately address any counter-evidence WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT?)

 

Well, as are all of my "commentary assignments" you may consider them only rhetorical. But, here's the list...

 

 

"Most American adults read a print book in the past year, even as e-reading continues to grow"

"Kids Aren't reading On Tablets"

"The Top 10 Books on Apple's iBooks"

 

"Book-crazy boy, 5, a budding literary critic"

 

"A brief guide to faking your way through literary classics when you haven't actually read them"

"Getting Rid of Books, Making Space for Life"

"Reading Books Is Fundamental"

 

"9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature"

 

"BEHIND TWO GOOD MOVIES, TWO GREAT BOOKS"

 

"CODE IS NOT LITERATURE"

 

"Why It's Important to Keep Reading Books By People Even If They're Monsters"

 

"Is American literature 'massively overrated"?

 

"Fla. Board of Ed weighs changes to Common Core"

 

"5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor"

 

"Holding Teachers Accountable For Decisions They Aren't Allowed to Make"

 

"The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves"

 

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

by GLT GLobal ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational non profit encouraging learners to "READ THE WOR(L)D"

 

 

 

 

 

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Free eBooks dealing with children's mental health

Free eBooks dealing with children's mental health | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Iris the Dragon’s books address a variety of emotional, behavioural and neurodevelopmental conditions and recognize the importance of family, school, and community in promoting the potential of every child.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Federal Bureaucrats Declare 'Hunger Games' More Complex Than 'The Grapes of Wrath' - The New Republic

Federal Bureaucrats Declare 'Hunger Games' More Complex Than 'The Grapes of Wrath' - The New Republic | college and career ready | Scoop.it

To be fair, both the creators of the Common Core and MetaMetrix admit these standards can’t stand as the final measure of complexity.  

As the Common Core Standards Initiative officially puts it, “until widely available quantitative tools can better account for factors recognized as making such texts challenging, including multiple levels of meaning and mature themes, preference should likely be given to qualitative measures of text complexity when evaluating narrative fiction intended for students in grade 6 and above.” But even here, the final goal is a more complex algorithm; qualitative measurement fills in as a flawed stopgap. 


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 1, 2013 8:02 PM

IS THIS ACCEPTABLE???

 

I did not realize that both the developers of the Common Core AND the Lexile Reading measurement admit that the existing assessment structures upon which much of the Common Core Literary Reading assessment is based, DO NOT adequately account for factors recognized ss making such texts challenging and that QUALITATIVE rather than the the current sorely lacking QUANTITATIVE measures for students in grade 6 and above would be preferred, essentially admitting that the existing literary reading  measurement is a seriously flawed stopgap. 

 

I found it interesting that in the quote from the article above, the author in an "effort to be fair," gave credit to both the creators of the Common Core and to MetaMetrix (developers of the Lexile Measurement) for recognizing that the standards assessment for literary reading can"t stand as a final measure the student's ability to read literary complexity. 

 

What's that old saying? Garbage in Garbage out?

 

Yet, the official position taken in spite of this recognition is that the test does not do the job; that we don't have a test that does the job; so we pretty much have to use a flawed data collection method because collecting data with a significant margin of error until we can do until we figure out how to get good data, is somehow better than collecting  nothing and thereby avoid polluting the data with  misleading results 

 

I would suggest that attempting "to be fair" to those who created the flawed measure and to those who use the flawed data is certainly gracious. However, it ignores the extent to which using a flawed measure to collect flawed data in order to make important decisions about educational reform is BEYOND UNFAIR to parents, students, educators, and taxpayers who are being led to believe that the data collected has value and who will to a large extent, falsely believing they have informed themselves, will vote for or against reforms proposed by legislators who unintentionally or otherwise will misinform, perhaps even stooping to disinform, their constituency regarding their concerns for what must be done to build a better education system.

 

The Humanities are in many ways, not like the sciences and the maths and history or even grammar, vocabulary and text decoding, all of which rely heavily upon knowing facts and having skills. The Humanities focus upon much more difficult to determine progress in assimilating the wisdom of the age and learning the great questions ; the questions that do not have simple right or wrong answers. Why do good things happen to bad people and bad things happen to good people? What are the motives that cause evil people to take advantage of the gullible, the less fortunate, those least able to protect themselves? What makessome  human beings do inhumane things and others seek to be humane beings?  Why did Atticus Finch not give up when he knew he would lose the case against the obviously innocent Tom Robinson? Why do we scapegoat rather than contemplate our own contribution to what we believe is not good or right?

 

It is not news to those who have reservations about the well-intended but still flaw-heavy Common Core State Standards assessment structures, that  in some areas the margin of error is not acceptable and yet it is being passed off as being "good enough." The comparison is not a new one when the author suggests that, "Lexile scoring is the intellectual equivalent of a thermometer: perfect for cooking turkeys, but not for encouraging moral growth"  which, of course, is the heart of why there is great value in seeking the wisdom for which literary reading is intended. 

 

And it is disengenuous to criticize those with concerns regarding the significant margin of error and subsequent misdirection of focus regarding the importance of literature as mere whining by teachers who don't want to be held accountable or teachers' unions who "are presumed to be the usual suspects for being the cause of the everything that is wrong with public education?"

 

Isn't it disengenuous to believe or pretend to believe that overly simplistic solutions can be passed off as potentially viable simple solutions?  

 

If we are to be fair to all those who want true educational reform, we should certainly be very concerned about the quality of our teachers' efforts and of our students' learning. However, I would suggest for what it's worth, that it be made clear that although some elements of the well-intended efforts of the Common Core State Standards are well-within an acceptable margin of error, at the same time, we ought to be more honest about the serious shortcomings of the existing assessment structures and make it equally clear that some elements have much to address before we can profess that what we truly want to measure is being measured well enough to rely "too heavily" upon. 

 

I am not proposing like many that we "simply"abandon the Common Core Standards and their intentions. That is not a simple solution. It is a simplistic solution. But, I might suggest that we take a cue from our data-obsessed record keeping friends in professional baseball who argue that some recorded performance outcomes ought to include a few asterisks to clearly note the questionable status that may have skewed the reliability of those performance outcomes. Remember Barry Bonds and the rest of the steroid-using athletes who set records that replaced records of predecessors who thought obeying the rules was a baseline for qualifying for being record holders? 

 

This is not to compare cheating to flawed data collection. However, what might be the extended impact of a student who does either exceptionally well or exceptionally poorly on a test that was exceptionally flawed to begin with? Will the false appearance that he or she is or is not ready for college and career cause some who are ready to not be accepted to their college of choice while others who only appear to be ready receive the precious acceptance letters? 

 

Do we really believe we can afford the potential public backlash if, by using flawed measures that produce flawed data that leads to flawed reform that does NOT lead to the desired educational results (again!) and millions of mispent tax dollars? It's a matter of earning the public trust. And we've all seen the results of losing the public trust haven't we?

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic

Help Students With Comprehension Through Collaborative Reading - Edudemic | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Collaborative reading and digital devices can give students a huge boost in comprehension. How? Take a look at these great tips from Holly Clark.

Via Ricard Garcia
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Key Data on Kid Reading | Scholastic.com

Key Data on Kid Reading  | Scholastic.com | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Surprising new findings from Scholastic’s Kids & Family Reading Report.

Via Joyce Valenza, Dennis T OConnor
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Christine Carlson's curator insight, August 9, 2013 10:43 AM

For a good overview of parents attitudes and children's reading habits.

Paige Jaeger 's curator insight, August 30, 2013 5:33 AM

Interesting read

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Coming Soon: The Common Core Test in Language Arts

Coming Soon: The Common Core Test in Language Arts | college and career ready | Scoop.it
The success of the Common Core Standards in Language Arts, adopted by more than 40 states, is supremely important for many reasons, not least because of the recent intensification of income inequality.

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Deb Gardner's curator insight, August 7, 2013 6:31 AM

"This indifference to knowledge building is the chief reason the verbal scores of our school leavers have stayed flat and low."


"The new Common Core standards have recognized this research finding. They state that these standards "do not -- indeed, cannot -- enumerate all or even most of the content that students should learn. The Standards must therefore be complemented by a well-developed, content-rich curriculum."


And they add: "Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades."


Well said! And we have to take care that the schools and the experts hear and act on that truth. Parents and concerned citizens should make sure that they do.

- E.D.  Hirsch

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Shanahan on Literacy: Coordinating PARCC Frameworks and Common Core Advice

Shanahan on Literacy: Coordinating PARCC Frameworks and Common Core Advice | college and career ready | Scoop.it

I, and many of my fellow high school English educators, need some (more) clarification on the 70/30 split. Our state has adopted the PARCC model and our district is implementing the model for the English classes. 


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Great Non-Fiction for Teaching the Common Core | Burkins & Yaris

Great Non-Fiction for Teaching the Common Core | Burkins & Yaris | college and career ready | Scoop.it
In this post, we share some titles from Lerner Publishers that pair nicely to offer students a well rounded reading experience.

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Deb Gardner's curator insight, June 24, 2013 9:51 AM

See Dea Conrad-Curry's comment/question for clarifying what it means to "pair text."

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Does Great Literature Make Us Better?

Does Great Literature Make Us Better? | college and career ready | Scoop.it

The view that literary fiction educates and civilizes its readers is widespread, and unproven."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 2, 2013 8:58 AM

If you teach literature you must read this article. 

 

Really! You may not like it. But it presents a question and an argument worthy of deep consideration.

 

And in what might be a bit of a surprise, I have to admit that I am in agreement with much of what is presented.

 

There is little evidence that there is a direct link between reading great literature and its civilizing impact on humanity.

 

IF THE QUESTION IS "Does great literature make us better?

 

However, IF THE QUESTION IS "Can great literature make us better?" then there is tremendous evidence of its ability to inspire, even in the long-term, our decisions and actions in the  presence of life's many ethical challenges. 

 

And even using the word "our" in the preceding sentence is a bit of a misleading and simplistic over-generalization. More accurately perhaps would be the replacing of the words "...our decisions and actions in the  presence of life's many ethical challenges..." with "...many people's decisions and actions in the  presence of life's many ethical challenges.." as it might be more accurate to suggest that some people do benefit from reading great literature while others do not.

 

And, to be even more accurate, it might be better to suggest replacing "...many people's decisions and actions in the presence of life's many ethical challenges..." with "...many people's decisions and actions in the presence of many of life's ethical challenges..." because even for the most dedicated bibliophile, none of us would suggest that reading great literature is a panacea-like preventative inoculation. 

 

There are simply too many variables that influence our decisions and actions in the face of life's ethical challenges to assign any universal conclusions. There is a world of difference between the question "DOES ____ make us better?" and "CAN _____ make us better?"

 

Personally, I'm convinced that literature and great art and spiritual beliefs and scientific discoveries and superstitions and wealth and poverty all have the potential for influencing our actions in the face of life's ethical challenges. And, that potential influence can actually influence people to sometimes make better ethical choices and sometimes make worse ethical choices. 

 

There are as some quite literate people believe and other quite literate people reject, many paths. No two of us take the same life journey. Nor are our decisions and actions influenced in exactly the same ways when we do share bits and pieces of our life's journeys. 

 

All of this is not to say that literature can not be defended if it can not be supported by evidence that it DOES make us better. But, I'm willing to bet that in representing the most articulate expressions of humanity's great questions, regardless of the original cultural, religious, social, economic or other circumstances influencing its creation, most have a universal common core of the very questions that CAN lead to influencing humane behaviors for many.

 

And for that reason, I can't help but believe that storytellers have always held an important "go to" place in every cultural in every age. 

 

The warning though at the end of the article, is well worth heeding...

_____

 

"I have never been persuaded by arguments purporting to show that literature is an arbitrary category that functions merely as a badge of membership in an elite. There is such a thing as aesthetic merit, or more likely, aesthetic merits, complicated as they may be to articulate or impute to any given work."

 

"But it’s hard to avoid the thought that there is something in the anti-elitist’s worry. Many who enjoy the hard-won pleasures of literature are not content to reap aesthetic rewards from their reading; they want to insist that the effort makes them more morally enlightened as well. And that’s just what we don’t know yet."

_____

 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Basal Alignment Project

A library of revised lessons for common Basal reading series (3rd-5th grades), each carefully aligned to the CCSS. Each new lesson includes quality text-dependent questions, improved tasks, and a focus on academic vocabulary.

How are educators using these materials?

- A free source of CCSS-aligned lessons which use existing materials
- Professional development on the Common Core

Who creates these materials?

Hundreds of teachers worked collaboratively to develop these replacement materials, following deep training on the Common Core by Student Achievement Partners. Each lesson has been authored, edited, and reviewed by a team of teachers


Via Deb Gardner
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Tim Shanahan: 10 Things Teachers Should Know About Reading Comprehension


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Deb Gardner's curator insight, February 12, 2013 4:20 AM

Helpful presentation particularly when thinking about instructional changes due to CCSS. Close reading is identified, the role of pre-reading, and also the difference between reading strategies, reading skills and when to use each.

lymari's curator insight, February 17, 2013 8:44 AM

add your insight...

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Introducing Textual Evidence in the Elementary Common Core Classroom ...step by step

Introducing Textual Evidence in the Elementary Common Core Classroom ...step by step | college and career ready | Scoop.it

In December I got an email from a teacher who said that the concept of teaching textual evidence and having it stick was overwhelming and too much for her weaker readers. We emailed back and forth and I sent her some resources. To introduce her students to textual evidence, I told her to remove the text and just focus on the skill of supporting inferences with evidence with picture books. For one week she spent 15 minutes each day discussing what it means to make an inference and support it. Then, she modeled it with a picture book.

 

Today I got an email where she introduced a challenging text to her third graders and they were able to dive right in and back up claims with textual evidence. The lesson? Don't 'hide' skills in the text. Model it and explain it as a skill and then teach students to apply it to text. This changes the accessibility  and lets all students have access to the skill set regardless of their reading capabilities. Scaffold in the text and gradually increase the complexity then.

 

These are the step by step instructions I gave her as she introduced it to her class from a picture book a day for a week and built from there.


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Roz Linder's curator insight, January 15, 2013 10:37 AM

Explicit skill instruction is key to all #CommonCore skills.

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Skype with an Author on World Read Aloud Day March 5th 2014!

Skype with an Author on World Read Aloud Day March 5th 2014! | college and career ready | Scoop.it

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How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other

How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other | college and career ready | Scoop.it
In addition to learning our content and curriculum standards, today's students also need to be able to do the following effectively: collaborate with one another, synthesize ideas, create content, ...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 17, 2:35 AM

Have you seen an RSA Animate video? Are you interested in learning how to make one or better yet, have your students make one? This post provides an in-depth look at how to go about have your students create an animated video that provides them with the opportunity to  practice 21st century skills (quoted from post below):

* collaborate with one another

* synthesize ideas

* create content

* communicate ideas clearly

* use technology

This activity is designed to have your students create content, providing you with materials to use in future classes as well as helping your current students understand the materiial.

The author, Jordan Collier, provides a detailed five-day plan. Day 1 would have you dividing students into groups of three, assign them a section of a chapter in a textbook, and determine the key facts that need to be taught. To read about how to assist them with this and the tasks for Day 2 - 5 click through to the post.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 18, 4:46 AM

Great one

Eduardo Wegman's curator insight, January 19, 7:29 AM

Collaboration is the key for future society development

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Getting Your Students to Love Reading (Infographic)

Getting Your Students to Love Reading (Infographic) | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Reading is a huge part of a child's development. In the early stages, it should be a shared experience between parent and child which can impact a love of books

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:18 PM

Although this infographic was written with the parent in mind the ideas are applicable for teachers. Chances are you have at least a few students in your classroom whom may not be as engaged as you would like. Learn some of the tricks that you might try to help them become more engaged and consider sharing this with parents.

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Common Core State Standards, Rules and Art

Common Core State Standards, Rules and Art | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Policies, laws and now the Common Core State Standards are all sets of rules designed to guide and shape human behavior. These rules are implemented through institutions. How does an individual find one's way through all these rules, regulations, and institutions to become an informed, self-reliant, productive citizen? Since I write for children, I try to answer questions and reduce BIG ideas to something that is easy to conceptualize. So at the risk of being taken as simplistic, I will make an attempt here.


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Deb Gardner's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:40 AM

My takeaway: "The standards are not in the books but in the way the books are used."

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How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading

How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading | college and career ready | Scoop.it
How Annotation Reshapes Student Reading

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Claire Williams's curator insight, September 3, 2013 4:27 PM

   This artical, shows not only what an annotation is but how to do so and how to teach it. It also shows reaons why it can be helpful and places you can use it. 

     There is also more to this artical than bears the eye, it involves other teaching techiques in the artical such as asking questions whaen reading.

    this artical might be helpful during the reading and writing log!!!

Jose's curator insight, February 6, 9:50 AM