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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Student-Driven Learning: 50 challenging questions to ask your students

Student-Driven Learning: 50 challenging questions to ask your students | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"Using the right questions creates powerful, sometimes multiple answers and discussions. Aristotle said that he asked questions in response to other people’s views, while Socrates focused on disciplined questioning to get to the truth of the matter."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 26, 2014 6:34 PM

Learning to ask good questions is a topic that is often discussed today..but how do we teach students to ask questions, questions that will help them use their higher order thinking skills. This post provides questions you may use with your students to help challenge their thinking. It is split into categories, but many of the questions could be across curriculum areas. The categories listed are:

* Logical questions that focus on mathematics and are split into two categories: collaborative questions for the class and self-reliance questions for individual students.

* Reasoning questions

* Analysis questions

* Connections questions

* Literary questions

* Science and social studies questions.

Below are three of the fifty questions. Click through to the post to find which may work with your students.

* An analysis question - What patterns might lead you to an alternative answer?
* A science and social studies question - What are some of the complexities we should consider?

* A reasoning question  - Why do you think this works? Does it always, why?

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example

Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example | college and career ready | Scoop.it
I am teaching a class where I allow the students a set amount of time to draw out what they know about a subject. Today, the students did their pre-class work, then came to class, and we began to d...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 9, 2013 8:20 PM

Check out this infographic which focuses on scaffolding for deeper understanding. Mia MacMeekin has provided a nine step process.

1. Ask a question.

2. Present a mystery for students to solve.

3. Ask students to draw what they know.

4. Give students ample time to research the mystery.

5. Ask students to draw the mystery and the solution again.

6. Ask students to share their drawings with other students.

7. Ask students to pull their ideas together in one drawing.

8. Teacher patiently asks what if questions.

9. If students needs more information, send them back to step #4, and start over again until the outcome or objective is reached.

MacMeekin notes that her students were engaged in the drawing/scaffolding phase of this and reached a deeper understanding than other classes had. It is also important to note that the ant is actually an analogy. To learn more click through to the post.

Xiaoxia Wang's curator insight, November 15, 2013 6:52 PM

How much time teachers would need this kind of problem-solving based scaffolding activity? When to use Thisbe kind of approach? 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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Keeping Students Engaged with Thoughtful Lesson Design

Harvard's Ron Ritchhart's planning frame for careful lesson design.  Includes the learning goal at the top , along with:

 

Understanding Goals, Understanding Performances, Learning Challenges, OnGoing Formative Assessment and Summative Assessment at the end.  Lovely guide for effective lesson design. 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
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So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going

So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."


Via Beth Dichter
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

Awesome!  Awesome!  Awesome!!  Heidi Hayes work is so creditable.  these ideas extended her thinking!

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 23, 2013 10:19 PM

What can you do to help extend the learning process, to keep it going in your classroom? This post provides "six strategies to help keep the learning going in your classroom." Below are two.

* At the end of an activity, project, lesson, or unit ask simple questions: So? So what? What now? What have you learned? Why is that important? What makes sense to do next in light of this progression?

* Promote self-directed learning using frameworks that teach students to access, evaluate, and use information in real-time, rather than simply “doing assignments.”

Click through to the post to read four more strategies.

Sue J Wilson's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:32 AM

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."

Roberta Orlando's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:01 AM

Interesting food for thought...worth reading ;)

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scientific teaching and engaged learning: building capacity for expert thinking
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Using Questioning to Stimulate Mathematical Thinking

Using Questioning to Stimulate Mathematical Thinking | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Good questioning techniques have long being regarded as a
fundamental tool of effective teachers. This article for teachers
looks at different categories of questions that can promote
mathematical thinking.

Via Sue Hellman3
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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Classroom Questioning: What Type Do You Use Most?

Cultures of Thinking and Ron Ritchhart

 

Questioning is a vital part of thinking, teaching and learning.  We need to consider the purpose of every activity our students engage in while always looking to build higher level questioning into the daily routine. 

 

Generative:  Exploring the topic

• Authentic questions or wonders that teacher doesn’t know the answer to.

• Essential questions that initiate exploration of a topic

Constructive:  Building New Understanding

• Extending & Interpreting

• Connecting & Linking

• Orienting and focusing on big ideas, central concepts, or purpose

• Evaluating

 

Facilitative:  Promotes the learner’s own thinking & understanding

• Requesting elaboration, reasons, evidence, justification

• Generating discussion among the class to hear different perspectives

• Clarifying and Uncovering


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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