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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Digital Literacies information sources
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Mapping Resources to Competencies Report - SCONUL


Via Fiona Harvey
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Fiona Harvey's curator insight, January 12, 11:43 AM
Digital Literacies resources for a review of the approaches, includes resources and project information
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Student loan confusion leads student to build online comparison site | USA TODAY College

Student loan confusion leads student to build online comparison site | USA TODAY College | college and career ready | Scoop.it

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Sharrock's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:15 AM

for school guidance counselors

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Statistics Is Not Math: Update To Allow New Comments

Statistics Is Not Math: Update To Allow New Comments | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Update Hello newcomers. Posts usually close for comments after two weeks. But since this one is getting so many views, I moved it up to re-open comments. "Here is a column of a couple of dozen numb...

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 25, 2013 7:47 AM

This blog explores the differences between statistics as a discipline and mathematics. I started wondering why the two were referred to as separate. It turns out, they are different.

 

from the blog: "Statistics rightly belongs to epistemology, the philosophy of how we know what we know. Probability and statistics can even be called quantitative epistemology. Our axioms concern themselves with what probability means; that is, of the interpretation of uncertainty. But we abandon those axioms too quickly, choosing instead to follow the path of equations, nearly always skimping on what those equations actually mean."