college and caree...
Follow
Find tag "MOOCs"
7.3K views | +0 today
college and career ready
CCR tools, standards, perspectives, indicators, solutions, concerns
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from educational implications
Scoop.it!

Employers and Community-College Students Aren't Sold on Online Degrees, Survey Finds - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Employers and Community-College Students Aren't Sold on Online Degrees, Survey Finds - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | college and career ready | Scoop.it

from the article: Carolin Hagelskamp, director of research at Public Agenda, said "one of the most interesting findings was that community-college students disputed the idea that online courses were more convenient and easier than traditional courses. According to the survey, students said not only were the online classes harder but they learned less."

 


Via Sharrock
more...
Sharrock's curator insight, September 24, 2013 3:21 PM

This survey makes one think about the connection between businesses and colleges. There are headlines stating that an "education bubble" is coming, but this article indicates that the "bubble" may not appear very soon or its nature will not drive students to MOOCs and online universities. The school name and the degree earned still carries value if this article is accurately concluding that there is a "technological generation gap". 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
Scoop.it!

The Coming Big Data Education Revolution

The Coming Big Data Education Revolution | college and career ready | Scoop.it
Big data promises to revolutionize online learning and, in doing so, higher education.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from University Master and Postgraduate studies and positions
Scoop.it!

9 public Universities of Louisiana Introduce Online Bachelor’s for Dropouts

9 public Universities of Louisiana Introduce Online Bachelor’s for Dropouts | college and career ready | Scoop.it

It´s not a MOOC, because it´s an official degree, but the agreement of 9 public institutions, and the fact that the degree is 100% online reduces dramatically the cost and university investment.

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

The nine universities in the University of Louisiana System plan to launch an online bachelor’s degree specifically geared toward students with some university credits but no degree, who have withdrawn from school before finishing. The system plans to begin accepting applications for its online Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership by February, according to a news release.


Via Alfredo Corell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Studying Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Massive Open Online Courses Are Multiplying at a Rapid Pace

Massive Open Online Courses Are Multiplying at a Rapid Pace | college and career ready | Scoop.it

In late September, as workers applied joint compound to new office walls, hoodie-clad colleagues who had just met were working together on deadline. Film editors, code-writing interns and “edX fellows” — grad students and postdocs versed in online education — were translating videotaped lectures into MOOCs, or massive open online courses. As if anyone needed reminding, a row of aqua Post-its gave the dates the courses would “go live.”

The paint is barely dry, yet edX, the nonprofit start-up from Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has 370,000 students this fall in its first official courses. That’s nothing. Coursera, founded just last January, has reached more than 1.7 million — growing “faster than Facebook,” boasts Andrew Ng, on leave from Stanford to run his for-profit MOOC provider.

“This has caught all of us by surprise,” says David Stavens, who formed a company called Udacity with Sebastian Thrun and Michael Sokolsky after more than 150,000 signed up for Dr. Thrun’s “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence” last fall, starting the revolution that has higher education gasping. A year ago, he marvels, “we were three guys in Sebastian’s living room and now we have 40 employees full time.”

 


Via Stewart-Marshall
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Positive futures
Scoop.it!

Leading Beyond the Status Quo – If You Are Determined To Learn, No One Can Stop You! | Podcast

Leading Beyond the Status Quo – If You Are Determined To Learn, No One Can Stop You! | Podcast | college and career ready | Scoop.it

To access the podcast, click on the title above or go to:  http://bit.ly/17vMOqL


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Jose Luis Anzizar, David Hain
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, September 2, 2013 10:42 PM

 

 In today‚Äôs competitive business environment, online learning and MOOCS are getting a lot of attention.

 

This week, we are joined by the President and CEO of Educause, Dr. Diana Oblinger, to explore the amazing learning opportunities available to everyone of us.

 

Any company, regardless of size or budget, can help their employees develop their skills for free, or at a minimal expense. Online learning allows us to bring learning to real issues from the workplace.

 

 

"If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.  If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you." ~ Unknown.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

MOOC Fatigue and the Future of Universities

MOOC Fatigue and the Future of Universities | college and career ready | Scoop.it

Though we all agreed that universities are here to stay, it was pretty obvious to everyone that universities will probably not look or feel like they do right now. Early signs of this shift are, of course, the MOOCs I’ll discuss later on, but also the general mindshift, especially in the tech sector.

Boiling it down to its essential, a degree is nothing more than the entrance certificate to a well-paid job. Yes, I know there are other (more important?) factors to it, but for the vast majority of students and parents who invest a degree program, it’s just that. And we all know that the return of investment of degrees has constantly spiraled downwards since the late 1980s as tuition costs rise.


Via juandoming
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

MOOC is not a dirty word… at least for the student | Sharon Perry

MOOC is not a dirty word… at least for the student | Sharon Perry | college and career ready | Scoop.it

"From a student point of view, a MOOC is a wonderful opportunity to try something for free, with no obligation if it doesn’t work out, or if circumstances force a change of mind."

 

Comment: Sharon is absolutely right, open content, free course are great resources, valuable supplements to what there already is out there. I myself have dipped my toes into MOOCs - never fully completed them, though - and even today was tempted to subscribe to the SpanishMooc.org. And I think many of the academics getting involved in MOOCs look upon them in this way too: hey, is this an interesting channel to use for sharing my thoughts or expertise with the rest of the world?

 

But remember, academic publishing in the eyes of academics is free too, by and large. It is the publisher that make money and the institutions that pay. Likewise with MOOCs, it is the institutions that have invested in the professor's salary that helped her become the expert she now is; it is the platforms and their funders, the venture capitalists, which reap the benefits, or at least intend to. Before we know it, they run the show, as publishers do with the impact rankings that in many countries at least in part dictate research policy (cf. the UK's research excellence framework). We should beware not to make the same mistake with something which is even more vulnerable and should be even more dear to use, the way we educate our children. While  I understand Sharon that is why I would like to underscore something she says in parenthesis, namely that we should _not yet_ fear MOOCs. Indeed, but once we realise we should have, we may find ourselves in a Faustian pact with the devil. Already MOOCs turn out be not so open as their names suggest. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
suifaijohnmak's comment, November 11, 2012 6:59 AM
Hi Peter, Well said. I think there are always two sorts of responses of xMOOCs, the emotional and rational (logical) responses. I share similar response to yours and that of Sharon: From a student point of view, a MOOC is a wonderful opportunity to try something for free, with no obligation if it doesn’t work out, or if circumstances force a change of mind." The fear of MOOC has never been my main concern. I am in favor of MOOCs that really address the needs of learners AND educators, based on a PULL collaboration model, rather than a PULL model only. My assumptions are that learners would value most when learning and autonomy form the basis of MOOC, not just the business, though that may be a critical success factor in the xMOOCs - in terms of sustainability. It must be WIN-WIN-WIN for both the institutions, educators and learners for such MOOCs become a success. It would be great if MOOCs adopt a pedagogy that would really transform education, and that would lay down a bright future for institutions, and the educators, rather than diminishing the roles in Higher Education. That would be pity if we close down the pathway towards a transformation of learning, and a revolution of education, if it benefits all.
suifaijohnmak's comment, November 11, 2012 7:00 AM
Should read "rather than a PUSH model only.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 11, 2012 5:54 PM
@ yes, thanks for pointing that out. I will add a note to the text to avoid confusing others who may be looking for it.