...
The text has a meaning just as any life situation has a meaning. However texts, as life situations, have a two-fold meaning. As Frankl says, there is the meaning of “what is meant” by the author or by the reality so to speak. In addition to this he wrote about the meaning that is embedded there, waiting for me to draw it out by discovering how it is inviting me to take a stand or do something. I create the meaning by responding to the text or the reality, by hearing how it is calling me, by interacting with it with my entire being.

This is necessarily a different kind of discussion. One characteristic of the first discussion is seeking evidence for whether the text means what I think it means. Participants will have different answers to this question and one answer will probably be more compelling than another.

In the second discussion the meaning of the word “meaning” shifts. The question becomes “What is the meaning this is inviting me to actualize through my response to it?” Here we are not reflecting the accuracy of each person’s logic. Here we are listening deeply to each person’s life calling and to the many strands of human becoming offered by the text. Instead of “shared inquiry” we might call this a shared meaning-discovery....


Via focusing_gr