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Collectivity
Collective Intelligence, Virtual Communities, PLNs, DIY, Remix Culture, Mashup as any of these topics seem relevant to education and the work of teachers. I will separate these into separate galleries later. June 16, 2012.
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The Open Source Definition | Open Source Initiative

The Open Source Definition | Open Source Initiative | Collectivity | Scoop.it

[Excerpted]

 

Open source doesn't just mean access to the source code. The distribution terms of open-source software must comply with the following criteria:

 

1. Free Redistribution
The license shall not restrict any party from selling or giving away the software as a component of an aggregate software distribution containing programs from several different sources. The license shall not require a royalty or other fee for such sale.

 

2. Source Code
The program must include source code, and must allow distribution in source code as well as compiled form. Where some form of a product is not distributed with source code, there must be a well-publicized means of obtaining the source code for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost preferably, downloading via the Internet without charge. The source code must be the preferred form in which a programmer would modify the program. Deliberately obfuscated source code is not allowed. Intermediate forms such as the output of a preprocessor or translator are not allowed.

 

3. Derived Works
The license must allow modifications and derived works, and must allow them to be distributed under the same terms as the license of the original software.

 

4. Integrity of The Author's Source Code
The license may restrict source-code from being distributed in modified form only if the license allows the distribution of "patch files" with the source code for the purpose of modifying the program at build time. The license must explicitly permit distribution of software built from modified source code. The license may require derived works to carry a different name or version number from the original software.

 

5. No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups
The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons.

 

6. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor
The license must not restrict anyone from making use of the program in a specific field of endeavor. For example, it may not restrict the program from being used in a business, or from being used for genetic research.

 

7. Distribution of License
The rights attached to the program must apply to all to whom the program is redistributed without the need for execution of an additional license by those parties.

 

8. License Must Not Be Specific to a Product
The rights attached to the program must not depend on the program's being part of a particular software distribution. If the program is extracted from that distribution and used or distributed within the terms of the program's license, all parties to whom the program is redistributed should have the same rights as those that are granted in conjunction with the original software distribution.

 

9. License Must Not Restrict Other Software
The license must not place restrictions on other software that is distributed along with the licensed software. For example, the license must not insist that all other programs distributed on the same medium must be open-source software.

 

10. License Must Be Technology-Neutral
No provision of the license may be predicated on any individual technology or style of interface.

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DIYcity

DIYcity | Collectivity | Scoop.it

DIYcity is a site where people from all over the world think about, talk about, and ultimately build tools for making their cities work better with web technologies.

 

The site launched in October 2008 and has since spawned local groups in more than 100 cities around the world. Web developers, urban planners, sustainability designers, students, government workers and more contribute to the discussions to help discover new ways of applying free and open technology to problems facing our urban areas today. In doing so, their aim is to reinvent their cities as places that are more efficient, more cost-effective, more sustainable, and simply more livable places to be.

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Abroad - Do-It-Yourself Culture Thrives Despite Globalism - NYTimes.com

Abroad - Do-It-Yourself Culture Thrives Despite Globalism - NYTimes.com | Collectivity | Scoop.it

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
Published: April 14, 2010

 

This essay talks about culture, globalization, internationalism, regionalism, microcultures...

 

"What’s new is the power available to wide swaths of the populace, thanks above all to cheap travel and the Web, to become actors in the production and dissemination of culture, not simply consumers. A generation or more ago, aside from what people did in their home or from what’s roughly called folk or outsider art, culture was generally thought of as something handed down from on high, which the public received."

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A Mash-Up Culture: Ten to Watch

A Mash-Up Culture: Ten to Watch | Collectivity | Scoop.it

[excerpts] These days, new developments in technology have made sampling and cutting-and-pasting easy enough for any amateur to do, and the Web is full of mash-ups, remixes, homages, parodies, fan-edits and even customizable videos. ... Some mash-ups and remixes are not only clever, inventive and meticulously executed, but also raise important questions about art and appropriation.

 

Delacruz comment: Our students are really really good at mashups and remixes. They borrow, reuse, and create all kinds of cool content online. YouTube and Photoshop are commonly used by kids these days to create new content. Approproiation (ok) borders on copyright infringement (not ok). See Lessig: "Remix". (yes, I know, these kids have more free time than we do, mom and dad are footing the bill for the creative use of new media by these digital kids, and they should be outside playing, rather than spending hours in from of their e-devices, bla, bla, bla, etc.)

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Remix

"Remix: Making Art and Culture Thrive in the Hybrid Economy"   Creative Commons Version

 

Kathleen Fitzpatrick at Barnes & Nobel writes: "Once dubbed a "philosopher king of Internet law," he [Lessig] writes with a unique mix of legal expertise, historic facts and cultural curiosity, citing everything from turn-of-the-century Congressional testimony to Wikipedia to contemporary best-sellers like Chris Anderson's The Long Tail. The result is a wealth of interesting examples and theories on how and why digital technology and copyright law can promote professional and amateur artLawrence Lessig is a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and founder of the School’s Center for Internet and Society. Professor Lessig is the author of Code v2, Free Culture, The Future of Ideas and Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, and has been a columnist for Wired, Red Herring, and the Industry Standard."

 

The book is available under a Creative Commons license from Bloomsbury Academic. This link takes you to Scribd (an online site that houses books and essays that have been uploaded by users). You need to get a Scribd account to download content from Scribd. Scribd is free. Scribd is for "giving" (sharing your content) as well as receiving, so you should  share somehting you've created there as well.

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How Americans learn about community issues | Pew Internet & American Life Project

How Americans learn about community issues | Pew Internet & American Life Project | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Neighbors Online
Jun 9, 2010. by Aaron Smith

 

How Americans learn about community issues | Pew Internet & American Life Project...

 

Americans use a range of approaches to keep informed about what is happening in their communities and online activities have been added to the mix. Face-to-face encounters and phone calls remain the most frequent methods of interaction with neighbors. At the same time, internet tools are gaining ground in community-oriented communications.

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Tinkering With Tomorrow | Will the DIY Movement Craft the Future? | NewAmerica.net

Tinkering With Tomorrow | Will the DIY Movement Craft the Future? | NewAmerica.net | Collectivity | Scoop.it

a series of videos from the event.

 

"New technologies are making it easier than ever to turn an idea into a reality. 3D printers, open-source software, hackable products, and collaborative communities have turned traditional tinkering into a full-scale “maker movement” that allows – and encourages – everyone to tap into their inner entrepreneur. Can this movement usher in a new age of innovation? Will hackers have a profound impact on the economy? And if so, are we prepared for it?"

 

See Turning Practice into Play video (learning by doing)

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The Digital Remix Mash-Up Culture Explained | The Daring Librarian

The Digital Remix Mash-Up Culture Explained | The Daring Librarian | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Sunday, February 20, 2011

 

"Recent technological developments have created a wave of user-generated content in which pre-existing sounds and images are appropriated, reshaped, and shared with unprecedented ease." Natalie Bennett

 

Delacruz comment: Gwyneth Anne Bronwynne Jones is a middle school teacher librarian, a blogger, a Tweeter, a public speaker, a citizen of Social Media, and a resident of Second Life. Gwyneth is a member of the ISTE Board of Directors. This award winning blog has numerous links of interest to this topic.  Worth exploring.

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Collective Intelligence in Humans: A Literature Review

Collective Intelligence in Humans: A Literature Review. Juho Salminen. Lappeenmada University of Technology. Lahti School of Innovation. Lahit Finland.

 

 

[From the abstract] "This literature review focuses on collective intelligence in humans. A keyword search was performed on the Web of Knowledge and selected papers were reviewed in order to reveal themes relevant to collective intelligence. Three levels of abstraction were identified in discussion about the phenomenon: the micro-level, the macro-level and the level of emergence. Recurring themes in the literature were categorized under the above-mentioned framework and directions for future research were identified."

 

[from the Intro]: "Study of collective intelligence in humans is a relatively new field, for which huge expectations are set, for example through speculations on the emergence of the Global Brain (see Heylighen, in press, for a review). Especially new forms of collaboration made possible by the Internet, web 2.0 and social media add to the hype. It is, therefore, no wonder that interest in the field is rising. According to an oftencited definition, collective intelligence is a form of universal, distributed intelligence, which arises from
the collaboration and competition of many individuals (Levy 1997). It is the general ability of a group to perform a wide variety of tasks (Woolley et al. 2010). The phenomenon is closely related to swarm intelligence, which means collective, largely self-organized behavior emerging from swarms of social insects (Bonabeau and Meyer 2001). These terms have been used somewhat interchangeably..."

 

[addl. from the paper] " In conclusion, combining various approaches of studying the collective intelligence of humans seems possible despite the multidisciplinary nature of the phenomenon. The three levels of abstraction offer different lenses through which collective intelligence can be viewed. The viewpoints complement each other to provide a fuller picture of this interesting phenomenon."

 

E. Delacruz note about this link: In searching for content for my collection of resources for this topic, I found this resource on Howard Rheingold's "Augmented Collective Intelligence" Scoop.it. A fitting example of the value of collective human endeavors, sharing (altruism with a dash of ego?), and the role of online social media.

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