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The covert war to discredit Seralini's study

GMWatch is an independent non-profit making organisation founded in 1998. We seek to counter the enormous corporate political power and propaganda of the biotech industry.
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GM controversy

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Collectivity
Collective Intelligence, Virtual Communities, PLNs, DIY, Remix Culture, Mashup as any of these topics seem relevant to education and the work of teachers. I will separate these into separate galleries later. June 16, 2012.
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What Rick Lowe's MacArthur Grant win means for art and social practice

What Rick Lowe's MacArthur Grant win means for art and social practice | Collectivity | Scoop.it
In 1993, artist Rick Lowe took over nearly two dozen derelict shotgun houses in Houston's Third Ward and, over the course of 20 years, turned them into a thriving cultural center that offers exhibitions, artist residencies and even a program for single moms. Project Row Houses has since become an important symbol of considered urban renewal -- of the way a neighborhood can be transformed for the better without obliterating its roots.
e.delacruz's insight:

Good article about art as social practice. Provides links to artists' examples.

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Youth Media and Its Digital Afterlife | Youth & Participatory Politics

Youth Media and Its Digital Afterlife | Youth & Participatory Politics | Collectivity | Scoop.it
e.delacruz's insight:

[excerpt]

 

Principal Investigator: 

Elisabeth (Lissa) Soep 

Youth Media and its Digital Afterlife traces how youth-generated media changes after it’s been released to the public. The research highlights contested cases in which young people’s projects have fundamentally shifted, in terms of their scope and scale, and what’s at stake, as a result of the post-publication activities of readers, viewers, users, and community members. Projects of interest, which include media stories and youth-designed mobile apps, fall into one of three inter-related areas: journalism, arts production, and advocacy efforts. Working in conjunction with the MAPP team, the study examines the tricky role of “youth voice” in political organizing and messaging, and identifies implications of youth media’s digital afterlife for how we understand, investigate, and support young people’s engagement in participatory politics. 

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The covert war to discredit Seralini's study

GMWatch is an independent non-profit making organisation founded in 1998. We seek to counter the enormous corporate political power and propaganda of the biotech industry.
e.delacruz's insight:

GM controversy

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MINORITY REPORT: America Will Be Defined By These Huge Demographic Shifts

MINORITY REPORT: America Will Be Defined By These Huge Demographic Shifts | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Kristen Lewis and Sarah Burd-Sharps, Measure of America | Jun. 21, 2012

 

[excerpts]

It's critical that cities do not lose sight of what makes creative, promising young people choose where to live. Jobs matter, but the most talented have many job opportunities.

 

Innovators of the future, if they are anything like innovators of today, will not want to live in a city that resembles a suburban golf club—a city stripped of texture, variety, and hidden gems.
The rising generation of majority-minority Americans will seek an inclusive, diverse civic life, opting for social solidarity rather than divisiveness. The inexorable march of gentrification and sorting of neighborhoods by income apparent in too many major cities crowds out many of the things that make city living exciting and fun. The best cities to live in twenty years from now will be those that invest in and make room for all the people living there today—because the real wealth of cities is people.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/america-will-be-defined-by-huge-demographic-shifts-2012-6#ixzz1yu9Yee92

 

 

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Apple Stores’ Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay

Apple Stores’ Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay | Collectivity | Scoop.it
While consumers tend to think of Apple’s headquarters as the company’s heart and soul, a majority of its workers in the United States are hourly wage earners selling iPhones and MacBooks.
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The virtual curmudgeon | Sept 2nd 2010

The virtual curmudgeon | Sept 2nd 2010 | Collectivity | Scoop.it

[excerpts]

 

Jaron Lanier, a pioneer of virtual-reality technology, has more recently become an outspoken critic of online social media.

 

From “Wikinomics” to “Cognitive Surplus” to “Crowdsourcing”, there is no shortage of books lauding the “Web 2.0” era and celebrating the online collaboration, interaction and sharing that it makes possible. Today anyone can publish a blog or put a video on YouTube, and thousands of online volunteers can collectively produce an operating system like Linux or an encyclopedia like Wikipedia. Isn’t that great?

 

No, says Jaron Lanier, a technologist, musician and polymath who is best known for his pioneering work in the field of virtual reality. His book, “You Are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto”, published earlier this year, is a provocative attack on many of the internet’s sacred cows. Mr Lanier lays into the Web 2.0 culture, arguing that what passes for creativity today is really just endlessly rehashed content and that the “fake friendship” of social networks “is just bait laid by the lords of the clouds to lure hypothetical advertisers”. For Mr Lanier there is no wisdom of crowds, only a cruel mob. “Anonymous blog comments, vapid video pranks and lightweight mash-ups may seem trivial and harmless,” he writes, “but as a whole, this widespread practice of fragmentary, impersonal communication has demeaned personal interaction.”

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17 Tips To Help You Become Better At Content Curation

17 Tips To Help You Become Better At Content Curation | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article: 

"Over the past few years I must have heard the phrase ‘everyone is a publisher nowadays’ a thousand times or more. It’s largely accurate, due to the rise of social media, but I think we are mainly ‘curators’, as opposed to ‘publishers’.

 

Content curation is something that many of us will be familiar with, even if we don’t think of ourselves as curators. We instinctively find and share interesting content with our personal and professional networks. We follow others who share the kind of links that engage and entertain.

 

Here are my 17 tips to help you become even better at content curation, with one eye on Twitter:

 

1) Set up some feeds

2) Make the most of email alerts

3) Get to grips with Twitter Search

4) Use advanced search queries

5) Follow the 70/30 rule

6) Find the right tools for the job

7) Own a niche

8) Read, read, read!

9) Write, write, write!

10) Timing is crucial

11) Aggregate the good stuff

12) Tune in to the right people

13) Mix up your tweets

14) Don't be afraid of the detail

15) Consider repeating yourself

16) Try to avoid the obvious

17) Use a notebook

 

Each tips is analyzed with some details. Read full article here: http://j.mp/K8AVt4


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Content Curation Tool Bundlr Shifts To Become Like Pinterest With Its New Version

Content Curation Tool Bundlr Shifts To Become Like Pinterest With Its New Version | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Excerpted from Journalism.co.uk:

"The content curation website Bundlr has just announced a new version of its service which allows for embedding of content from a wide range of sources.

 

By partnering with Embedly the site now supports over 200 sources of content, including Storify, Pinterest and Amazon, for users to add to their bundles.

 

Embedly is the service that the new version of Twitter uses to embed photographs and articles in your Twitter stream and is used by a host of other sites such as Reddit and Bitly and comes as a WordPress plugin.

 

While Bundlr was originally seen as an alternative to sites like Storify, which can be used to create stories from curated links and content, Bundlr's focus is now on creating a top-level resource for curated content around a story or topic."

 

Read original article here: http://j.mp/Nh4rz1

 

Try it out: http://bundlr.com


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Curation - Robin Good Interviews Futurist Ross Dawson

Curation - Robin Good Interviews Futurist Ross Dawson | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Master Curator Robin Good interviews Futurist Ross Dawson. Here is an excerpt from article:

"Robin asked him: 

a) what he suggests to people who want to "make sense of the world", when bombarded by such large amounts of information. How do you make sense of how things are?

b) What is "curation"?

c) Is there any difference between personal, serendipitous social sharing and content curation?

d) What is the key discriminator between the two?

 

Ross Dawson answers: 

a) One of the best ways to make sense of the world is scenario planning or scenarios, where you build a number of worlds for what might happen and that's relevant to you and to use these as filters...

As you look at that and see new things, that's an enormously valuable filter around what is interesting, what is useful, what I need to pay attention to, and what I don't...

 

b) Curation is selecting what is relevant, selecting what is interesting... ...and this is now becoming almost overwhelming in terms of how many people are doing that.

 

Ultimately, [the goal is to reach a point] where I can wake up in the morning and I can say I know I have seen the most interesting and relevant things for me.

We're a long way away from that.

 

c) Sometimes, they can overlap, but [a curator] is usually [someone] saying, "I'm in a particular area. I am the expert. I know what there is. I'm doing that for people who are interested that topic, people I want to demonstrate my expertise too."

 

d) There's three, perhaps, [types of] intent.

1) One is to contribute to others, to give.

2) Another is to develop your own expertise. I think that's one of the ways to be able to search for and share things actually does make you know more, and I think that's very valid.

3) [The third one, which] is equally valid, though perhaps a little too overdone at the moment, is just people curating so that people look at them..."

 

Read full original article and watch videos here:

http://www.masternewmedia.org/curation-a-view-from-the-future/

 


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Scoop.it: reinventing content curation and development

Augist 2011. Video of Guillaume Decugis, CEO of scoop.it talks about social curation of content and how scoop.it functions as a magazine (that users create) that can be shared with users' other social media sites (twitter, facebook, linked in, tmblr, etc). Discussion includes: user created curation, filtering by interest, and ability for users to add comments (content). Scoop.it is not just user generated; topics are also generated on/by scoop.it based on what is curated there by users.

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Pierre Lévy on Collective Intelligence Literacy

Howard Rheingold 13-minute interview with Pierre Lévy about collective intelligence. Discusses ant, mammal, & human collective intelligence, the role of language and culture in optimizing human collective intelligence, the impact of new digital media networks, and the new skills and dispositions needed: selecting, filtering, organizing, categorizing and sharing information in an  "everybody is an author era". Ends with a brief mention of citizen knowledge and civic knowlegde commons.

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How the Art of Social Practice Is Changing the World, One Row House at a Time | ARTnews

How the Art of Social Practice Is Changing the World, One Row House at a Time | ARTnews | Collectivity | Scoop.it
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“The Revolution Will Be Hashtagged”: The Visual Culture of the Occupy Movement

“The Revolution Will Be Hashtagged”: The Visual Culture of the Occupy Movement | Collectivity | Scoop.it
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Henry Jenkins blog. Oct 2011.

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Quinoa: Good, Evil, or Just Really Complicated?

Quinoa: Good, Evil, or Just Really Complicated? | Collectivity | Scoop.it
Like any globally traded commodity, the trendy Andean psuedo-grain offers promise and peril to the people who grow it.
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Newsroom: Population: Most Children Younger Than Age 1 are Minorities, Census Bureau Reports

Newsroom: Population: Most Children Younger Than Age 1 are Minorities, Census Bureau Reports | Collectivity | Scoop.it

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

[excerpts]

 

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a set of estimates showing that 50.4 percent of our nation's population younger than age 1 were minorities as of July 1, 2011. This is up from 49.5 percent from the 2010 Census taken April 1, 2010. A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.

 

The population younger than age 5 was 49.7 percent minority in 2011, up from 49.0 percent in 2010. A population greater than 50 percent minority is considered “majority-minority.”

 

There were 114 million minorities in 2011, or 36.6 percent of the U.S. population. In 2010, it stood at 36.1 percent.

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A Conversation With Bill Gates - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

A Conversation With Bill Gates - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Collectivity | Scoop.it

June 25, 2012
A Conversation With Bill Gates About the Future of Higher Education
By Jeffrey R. Young

[excerpts]

 


Bill Gates never finished college, but he is one of the single most powerful figures shaping higher education today. That influence comes through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, perhaps the world's richest philanthropy, which he co-chairs and which has made education one of its key missions.

 

 

The Chronicle sat down with Mr. Gates in an exclusive interview Monday to talk about his vision for how colleges can be transformed through technology. His approach is not simply to drop in tablet computers or other gadgets and hope change happens—a model he said has a "really horrible track record." Instead, the foundation awards grants to reformers working to fix "inefficiencies" in the current model of higher education that keep many students from graduating on time, or at all. And he argues for radical reform of college teaching, advocating a move toward a "flipped" classroom, where students watch videos from superstar professors as homework and use class time for group projects and other interactive activities. As he put it, "having a lot of kids sit in the lecture class will be viewed at some point as an antiquated thing."

 

The Microsoft founder doesn't claim to have all the answers. In fact, he describes the foundation's process as one of continual refinement: "to learn, make mistakes, try new things out, find new partners to do things."

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In This Online University, Students Do the Teaching as Well as the Learning - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

In This Online University, Students Do the Teaching as Well as the Learning - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Collectivity | Scoop.it

[excerpts]

 

By Katherine Mangan

 

A poet with a hankering to learn code recently teamed up with a Web developer who was curious about poetry as part of a new kind of teaching experience.

 

The lessons took place at Peer 2 Peer University, a three-year-old online institution where students learn together, at no charge, using materials found on the Web. The poet, Vanessa Gennarelli, and the programmer, John Britton, taught each other online, discovering unexpected bridges between their disciplines.

 

At a time when free online courses are enticing students with the opportunity to learn from star professors at prestigious colleges, P2PU, as it's known, is questioning whether instructors are needed at all.

 

The unusual institution, where anyone with a passion for a topic can set up a course, is experimenting with ways that students can navigate together through open courseware that's free on the Web.

 

In the process, the project is stimulating discussion in open-education circles about the evolving roles of peers and professors in the growing number of free online courses.

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8 Social Curation Tricks For Pinterest And Beyond | iMediaConnection

8 Social Curation Tricks For Pinterest And Beyond | iMediaConnection | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article:

"Today curation takes on a different meaning. Organizations have evolved from collecting artifacts to digital curation of media and content.

Anyone and everyone can, and do, curate using everything from bookmarking sites to social networks. "Social curation," as we call it, is simply the act of sharing, categorizing, and spreading content to others.

The content can be your own or someone else's. And, because you are sharing content that lives in its place of origin via linking, it is not considered stealing.

 

Why do people spend hours online bookmarking, pinning, and reposting?

We all want to be recognized for our expertise, talents, and savvy. Posting content we care about displays our creativity, interests, opinions, and personality.

On the receiving end, people enjoy discovering and exploring things that are highly relevant and interesting.

 

In this article, we'll discuss how marketers can get in on the social curation boom in a meaningful way.

 

There are a lot of websites out there offering curation-type services. To get a clear sense of how a brand might leverage curation, we can break them down into categories.

- Social bookmarking and news;

- Sharing;

- Aggregation and syndication networks.

 

Here are eight ways your brand can get in on the action.

 

1. Become a curator creator:

This tactic is strictly for warriors because it takes time, diligence, and a step outside the marketing box to become one with a community. Becoming a curator will mean rolling up your sleeves to create your own Pinterest board or other social network profile.

 

2. Create an interest-based content strategy:

As marketers, we tend to base our communications around products and target markets. To be an awesome content curator or creator, you'll want to push that into the back of your mind and focus on interests. This can be accomplished with some listening, observation, and information collection on what your customers care about when they aren't out buying your product.

 

3. Optimize for popular sharing topics...

 

4. Treat photography as being as important as copy:

Video and photography is as valuable as an article. When you're writing your next brilliant article, put time into article images so people are inspired to not only share the article, but also to pin it on Pinterest.

 

5. Make something worth sharing:

For curation, consider its lasting value and how it fits into popular topics and interest lists. When you see their eyes light up and they send it forward into their communities, you've done your job well.

 

6. Make it sharable:

Add sharing buttons to your content on your blog, website, shopping cart, and email campaigns. People will do things that require one-click.

 

7. Make friends with influencers:

Extend your influencer outreach to leaders in Reddit, Pinterest, and Tumblr communities so that when you have something great to share, you've aligned with partners to help get your content out.

 

8. Post from the inside:

People just want to get to know the people behind the brand...."

 

Read full and long article here: http://j.mp/K1zGxl

 


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9 Ways to Improve the Signal to Noise Ratio on Twitter | Brian Solis

9 Ways to Improve the Signal to Noise Ratio on Twitter | Brian Solis | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article:

"The feeling the overload of information is very real and a reflection of our inability to pull the levers necessary to decrease noise and improve signal. Doing so, requires some very blatant actions that don’t simply reduce the volume of the information we don’t care to see as often, it requires disconnecting from human beings. Whether we’re severing ties with individuals or those representing an organization we once supported, it’s emotional.

 

Think about why you Tweet or update your status. It’s part self-expression, part therapy, part fulfilling, and of course, part egocentric.

 

We are as guilty by our inaction as others are for their action. And at the same time, we are also guilty of contributing to the noise. The truth is that it’s easier to blame others than hold up a digital mirror.

 

Here are 9 Ways to Improve the Signal to Noise Ratio in Social Networks:

 

1. News No Longer Breaks, it Tweets:

Old news is no news. Twitter places emphasis on real-time information.

 

2. Add Perspective:

Opinions in social media tend to spark dialogue. So, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or move the conversation forward rather than simply sending your update or hitting Like or Retweet.

 

3. K.I.S.S.:

I often say, in brevity there’s clarity. Of course, it’s easier said than done. Studies show that followers appreciate conciseness. Keep it short.

 

4. Don’t #geekout with @’s and #Syntax LOL <-This!:

It’s pretty easy to geek out on Twitter…especially when using 140 characters is already too complicated (kidding). Often we’re ompelled to overuse Twitter syntax such as #hashtags, @mentions, code, and abbreviations.

 

5. Strengthen Your Inner Voice:

For some reason, Twitter debilitates our ability to practice self restraint and therefore we are somehow inspired to express nonessential experiences.

 

6. Context is King:

Think about each Tweet or update as contributing to an experience or image that you want others to see of you or of your perspective.

 

7. If You Don’t Have Anything Good to Say…:

 

8. Introduce Brain Teasers:

Savvy marketers, producers, and editors alike figured out long ago that building anticipation creates an appetite before an official release. Intrigue your followers.

 

9. Brands are People Too:

The study found that individuals or businesses with a public persona should pay particular attention to how their status updates lend to the brand they wish to portray. Sounds incredibly commonsensical, but it’s not as it ties to several of the bullets above.

 

Read full article here:

http://www.briansolis.com/2012/05/9-ways-to-improve-the-signal-to-noise-ratio-on-twitter/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Ethical Studios's comment, May 20, 2012 7:18 AM
Nice article Giuseppe. Thanks!
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The Democratisation Of Everything: The Curators Will Save Our Collective Ass

The Democratisation Of Everything: The Curators Will Save Our Collective Ass | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Giuseppe Mauriello: This is my “scoop” article for today. I found this article written by Suw Charman-Anderson in November of 2006 from her first professional blog “Strange Attractor”,  now permanently moved to charman-anderson.com.

Suw is journalist, social technologist consultant and writer, one of the UK’s social media pioneers. She writes for Forbes, The Guardian, amongst others.
In 2009, she founded of “Ada Lovelace Day”, an international celebration of the achievements of women in technology, science, engineering.

Returning to her article, it is highly relevant today.
At the beginning of the article, the author describes the scenario of the digital industry at the time, then come out few interesting and great points about the need of content curation and the importance of the role of the curator. Here are some gems:

“We already have more movies available than any one person can watch; more videos on YouTube; more blogs… more everything. It’s not like we’re starting from a point of scarcity here. And the flood of stuff is going to turn into a rampaging torrent as more people get online and more people get excited by their ability to participate and create.

In the past, the media acted as gatekeepers.
They were the ones that went to the movie previews…
They were the ones who got the advance copy of the game…
They were the arbiters of taste, the people in the know, the ones with the connections needed to get at culture before us plebs got at it.

But we don’t need gatekeepers anymore. We don’t need people who stand between us and our stuff, deciding what to tell us about and what to ignore. We don’t need arbiters of taste.

We do, however, still need help. There’s just too much stuff around for us to know what’s out there, to keep up with what’s good, what works for us, what is worth investigation. What we need are curators.

We need people who can gather together the things that are of interest to us, things that fit with our tastes or challenge us in interesting ways, things that enrich our lives and help us enjoy our time rather than waste it on searching.

Curators already exist. Some are people: Bloggers who sift through tonnes of stuff in order to highlight what they like, and who, if you have the same taste as them, can be invaluable to discovering new things to like.
But curation of the web has barely started. Much of what you could call curation that exists today is flawed: too many noisy opinions and not enough capacity to understand what I as an individual want…”

 

I loved this article and title that the author chose for it. Read original article here:
http://strange.corante.com/2006/11/08/the-democratisation-of-everything-and-the-curators-who-will-save-our-collective-ass


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Dasom Ssomy Kim's comment, May 8, 2013 5:52 AM
Content curation, not gatekeeping. people can choose
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The new wave of social curation tools

The new wave of social curation tools | Collectivity | Scoop.it

Thomas Houston on January 6, 2012 01:34 pm

 

[excerpts]

 

A bevy of curation sites like mlkshk, Gimmebar, Pinterest, Snip.it have seen huge growth over the past year, and we're starting to see many of these ideas incorporated across the web.

 

Unlike Facebook, Twitter, or Google+, these tools are more about sorting, tagging, and curating what you see around the web.

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What is Social Curation? Sundar Kadayam

Social curation is the act of making sense of information in a group setting or team setting. Sundar Kadayam. Curation: Sifting through mountains of information to find (and archive) information that is meaningful to your need. Social Curation: Doing this in a group setting where the group also benefit.

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