Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
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Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
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4 Social Learning Facts You Should Know

4 Social Learning Facts You Should Know | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Social media giants like FaceBook and the like demonstrate the possibilities that we have available to us when it comes to social learning. To help you get a bit more acquainted with social learning in 2013, see some of the facts below:

 

1. It’s On the Rise: Learning by informal, social methods is more and more common. Learning development professionals have traditionally used tools to help learners collaborate, usually by leveraging discussion forums.  New APIs and slick gamification tools enables more complex ways for social interaction.

 

2. From “2.0″ to “3.0″: Some argue that social learning “3.0″ is all about the blending of formal learning methods and informal methods through social experience. No more is learning defined by the data stored in an Learning Management System (LMS), it is about leveraging and evaluating real experiences.

 

3. Software Offerings: We are now seeing more platforms emerge that present feature-rich learning management capabilities. Learners can now interact with the content instead of just have it delivered to them.  Quizzes are becoming more dynamic within these programs as well.

 

4. Big Business: With the rapid growth in learning management, social learning, and new APIs, the learning industry is attracting some big players. Recently, IBM bought out Kenexa, and are expected to make more strategic acquisitions within the learning industry.

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ConsultingMD helps patients get speedy second opinions from top specialists

ConsultingMD helps patients get speedy second opinions from top specialists | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

ConsultingMD, a startup that connects patients with leading medical specialists, has raised a $10 million round of funding from Venrock Capital. The company, which launched earlier this year and previously raised $1 million from Harrison Metal, enables patients to seek second opinions from a network of top doctors, and to get referrals to  specialists in their own area. With the funding, the startup said it plans to further develop its technology and build out its network of elite doctors.

 

In contrast to startups like ZocDoc or HealthTap, which help patients find any doctor available in their area or online, ConsultingMD bills itself as service that offers access to only the doctors in the top echelon of the medical world. These physicians – who encompass the one percent of their profession – tend to be the chiefs or chairmen of the department, with publications in the top medical journals, the company says.

 

“The core problem is that in the highly elite world of academic specialists… access to these people is difficult [and] patients don’t know how to find them in the first place,” said CEO and co-founder Owen Tripp, who was previously COO and co-founder of Reputation.com. The company’s other co-founder is Dr. Lawrence Hofman, chief of interventional radiology at Stanford Hospital.

 

Through the site, patients in need of second opinion spend a few minutes describing their case, disclosing where they’ve already received care and authorizing ConsultingMD to access their medical history. Then the startup digitizes and indexes the relevant medical records (an often frustrating and dragged-out process for patients) and delivers it to the appropriate specialist on ConsultingMD.

 

While it can take the company an average of seven or eight days to aggregate all the records, once the doctor receives the information, Tripp said, they the doctor  can turn around a second opinion in an average of 48 hours.

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Google Search scratches its brain 500 million times a day

Google Search scratches its brain 500 million times a day | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Google's search engine is powerful, but not all-knowing. Every month Google processes 100 billion queries, and typically returns results with microsecond speed. However, on a fairly regular basis, Google's search engine has to think a bit harder to render a result. On a daily basis, 15 percent of queries submitted -- 500 million -- have never been seen before by Google's search engine, and that has continued for the nearly 15 years the company has existed, according to John Wiley, the lead designer for Google Search.

 

"We have to solve that problem," an understated Wiley said in an interview with Bloomberg TV.  In the process of trying to know more and reduce the 15 percent of new, previously unread or unheard queries, Google crawls 20 billion Web sites per day in search of new data that it can turn into results.


A key part of Google's quest to reduce the percentage of unseen queries, and provide answers rather than lists of links, is the Knowledge Graph. It's a vast database that understand entities -- such as topics, people, and events -- and the connections among them, somewhat like the human brain. Knowledge Graph has more than 570 million entities and 18 billion facts about connections between them, by Google's count.

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Newsgrape blends Reddit and Google News-style features for the ultimate social news stream

Newsgrape blends Reddit and Google News-style features for the ultimate social news stream | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Newsgrape has rolled out a substantial update to its social news streaming platform, and it now combines community voting similar to Reddit, with so-called "smart filtering" ...

 

So what, exactly, does Newsgrape do?

 

Newsgrape offers its users a personalized news stream, which now combines articles that are currently trending on Twitter and articles that are performing well on Newsgrape into a single stream. Co-founder Fasbender says that this marks a “hugely important step” in Newsgrape’s design, as it’s striving to connect high-quality user-generated content with traditional media. Fasbender adds that it’s setting out to change the way people “experience, share and distribute written content on the Web”.

 

Fasbender says that it’s analyzing almost a quarter of a million articles each day from a growing number of sources, as it tailors its content to match the personal interests and preferred sources of users, while ranking articles according to their performance on Twitter and the activity inside Newsgrape.

 

So what, ultimately, Newsgrape wants to be is an all-encompassing information stream that reels in news from the likes of the BBC, alongside content from anyone with an itchy keyboard finger.  Thus, Newsgrape offers readers is a stream of information that combines news, facts (linked through to the Wikimedia database) and opinions or blogs. And for writers, it lets them publish directly into the system, with comments, views and votes determined by the platform and marked beside each article – only the top-performing ones appear in the global stream.

 

 

 

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Tipflare: Two MIT Seniors Build A One-Stop Shop For Recommendations On Anything | TechCrunch

Tipflare: Two MIT Seniors Build A One-Stop Shop For Recommendations On Anything  |  TechCrunch | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
With so much information, content and so many services now living online, there's a lot of choice -- even for something as simple as where to go to buy a new pair of socks. Oh, and there's a lot of...

 

With so much information, content and so many services now living online, there’s a lot of choice — even for something as simple as where to go to buy a new pair of socks. Oh, and there’s a lot of data. As it’s evolved and gotten better at making sense of its new Big Data, the Web has become an extraordinary engine for discovering new stuff: News, cat videos, porn, you name it. Naturally, scores of sites are becoming (or are building) recommendation engines to help users wade through the noise, and, dining on Big Data, they get smarter every day.

 

However, as it stands today, the discovery process is pretty fragmented, as recommendation engines tend to be domain-specific. Want to find a good movie? Try Netflix. Want to find a good book? Go to GoodReads, etc. And this fragmentation makes for a crappy user experience.

 

So, frustrated with the fact that there’s no one-stop shop for great recommendations on, well, everything, a couple of seniors at MIT have developed, and quietly launched, Tipflare to be that general solution. While the site’s creators, Hayden Metsky and Thiago Vieira, have bigger ambitions, today Tipflare focuses in on giving users one place to find quality recommendations on books, movies, songs, and restaurants — in a jiffy.

 

If you’ve ever struggled to find a recommendation for a good book that’s actually based on what you like to read and not just your browsing or purchase history (Amazon, for example) and then repeat that for a good movie, Tipflare’s value is obvious. If not, you might just say, hey, why not go to GoodReads or Amazon or Netflix? And it’s true that, using Netflix as an example, those that specialize in one domain will probably be better at recommending (say, movies) than a generalist.

But the Tipflare creators aren’t worried about that. If you want to watch something on Netflix, you’ll discover on Netflix. Instead, Tipflare really aims to differentiate itself from other services by being broad in focus while trying to keep the design and UX as clutter-free and as easy to use as possible.

 

Users simply enter what movies or books they like — or import their “likes” from Facebook, and the site instantly serves recommendations on what they’ll go bananas for based on what they already enjoy, factoring in Facebook friends’ interests, your location (for restaurants, specifically), the day of the week, time of day, etc. so that it can offer “New for You” recommendations when you come back.

 

Like Triposo, the travel and destination recommendation service we recently covered, Tipflare leans heavily on its algorithms to serve quality recommendations. But it also incorporates social cues as well, though Metsky says that Tipflare’s social integration is really a tool to back up and support its algorithm. It’s the supporting cast, not the star.

 

While Tipflare has a lot to recommend it (see what I did there?), it’s not a panacea. In other words, it’s not yet that next-gen, hyper-intelligent personal assistant; it still requires work on the part of the user. One day in the not-so-distant future, the Web, search, etc. will transition from a demand-based system (where you input what you want and a service tells you where to go), to one that’s more actively directive in telling you what to do and where to go based on your history, behavior, browsing, and more.

 

The site is early in its gestation and still has a long way to go, but the founders are asking the right questions. When it comes to algorithmic recommendations and discovery, there’s a trust issue. Google and so many others are addressing this with friendsourced and social graph-authenticated recommendations and results. The core reason for this being, hey, you’re probably going to trust recommendations from real people, especially those who know you and your tastes, more than a machine — even if those algorithms are wizardry.

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Mozilla’s Web Literacy Standard, a framework for learning online, to launch in beta on June 26

Mozilla’s Web Literacy Standard, a framework for learning online, to launch in beta on June 26 | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Mozilla plans to launch the beta version of its Web Literacy Standard, a new online framework drawn up to help people read, write and participate on the Web, on June 26.

 

The project is an expansion of Webmaker, an initiative originally set up to help millions of people create new tools and content for the Web, rather than simply absorbing it as a passive user.

 

Doug Belshaw, Badges and Skills Lead at the Mozilla Foundation, says that the ideas and groundwork created for Webmaker could apply to all sorts of projects. There’s no overarching system, no way of clearly seeing the user’s skillset that needs to be addressed on the Internet.

 

“There’s so many people and organizations doing such excellent stuff around Web Literacy, but it’s a fragmented landscape,” Belshaw said. “Learners don’t know what they don’t know, and organizations providing learning content aren’t usually in a position to offer a comprehensive range of learning activities. The work needs joining-up.”

 

The first draft of the Web Literacy Standard was released on April 26 with a competency grid, split into three sections, which cover the fundamentals such as navigation, privacy, sharing and collaboration.

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Andre Alipio's curator insight, June 3, 2013 3:32 PM

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Life-Tracking App Expereal Is Your Personal Weapon Against Cognitive Biases

Life-Tracking App Expereal Is Your Personal Weapon Against Cognitive Biases | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Emotions play tricks on our memories, making our recollections of events much happier or heart-wrenching than they actually were. Smartphone app Expereal seeks to cut through those cognitive traps by allowing you to rate your day on a 10-point scale and organizing that data into easy-to-read charts.

The iOS app (Android and Web-based versions are planned) is the brainchild of Brooklyn-based digital strategist Jonathan Cohen, who was inspired by psychologist Daniel Kahneham’s 2010 TED talk “The riddle of experience vs. memory.” Kahneham argues that our memories are often distorted by cognitive biases. For example, one bad day can completely spoil someone’s memory of an otherwise pleasurable two-week vacation.

When designing Expereal, Cohen decided to stick to a 10-point scale to help users keep their ratings objective.  “I could have potentially asked people to pick a word to describe their mood, but what I like about numbers is that in order to get the full breadth and benefit you also have to enter tags and give meaning to it,” says Cohen.

Expereal’s first screen allows you to rate your day (or part of the day, depending on how often you use the app). Then you can note your location and the people you are with, add tags and snap a photo. A drop-down menu takes you to a set of charts that visualize your ratings by day, week or month, and compares your numbers to all of Expereal’s users or your Facebook friends who also use the app (data is aggregated anonymously). The “Expereotype” option is an album of your in-app photos with embedded ratings, tags and locations.

Cohen says Expereal fills the gap left by journaling apps and life-tracking wearable tech products like Jawbone UP and Nike Fuelband.

“None of these services in my mind really address the fundamental question–’how is my life going and how is it trending over time?’ I thought that by having a better understanding of this over time, it would be an interesting way to look back in order to move forward,” says Cohen.

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Organizing the World's Scientific Knowledge to make it Universally Accessible and Powerful:

Google Tech Talk April 30, 2013  - Abstract: Not all information is created equal. Accurate, innovative scientific knowledge generally has an enormous impact on humanity. It is the source of our ability to make predictions about our environment. It is the source of new technology (with all its attendent consequences, both positive and negative).  It is also a continuous source of wonder and fascination.


In general, the value and power of scientific knowledge is not reflected in the scale and structure of the information infrastructure used to house, store and share this knowledge. Many scientists use spreadsheets as the most sophisticated data management tool and only publish their data as PDF files in the literature. In this high-level talk, we describe a powerful, new knowledge engineering framework for describing scientific observations within a broader strategic model of the scientific process.

 

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GroupMap

GroupMap | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Real time, collaborative brainstorming with a twist. GroupMap shows you what the group is thinking by combining the views and ideas of individual participants.

 

Real time, collaborative brainstorming with a twist. GroupMap shows you what the group is thinking by combining the views and ideas of individual participants.

 

It provides valuable insight for leading a group, collective learning and effective decision making. Solve a problem, learn together or discover common ground...quickly and effectively.

 

Unlike other collaborative brainstorming tools, GroupMap allows each participant to maintain their own ideas around the brainstorming topic. Each idea entered is shared between participants to identify it's level of support, or allow similar ideas to be combined. As each participant develops their own view GroupMap automatically aggregates everybody's ideas together to show the group's overall perspective.

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