Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
5.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
Curated by Huey O'Brien
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Now Building Hubbl, A “Gamified” App Discovery Platform

Now Building Hubbl, A “Gamified” App Discovery Platform | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Here’s how it works.

 

Hubbl captures the opinions about an app from around the web by aggregating content from mainstream media articles, blogs and app enthusiasts. It combines these opinions with those from your friends on Facebook (if you sign up with Facebook), your friends on Hubbl and the Hubbl community at large in order to organize the apps into smart collections. These collections aren’t just general categories like “games” or “social,” but can be narrowly focused on one particular app feature, too. For example, Evernote is a Productivity and Note-taking tool, but you can tag it “LifeLogging” if that’s what you use it for. 

 

These categories work like Twitter hashtags in the app. If you tap on “LifeLogging” in the above example, you would come across a list of apps that also fit that genre. And then you may end up tapping on one of those apps’ other hashtags to follow drill down into a different feature set, too. There’s a feeling of serendipitous, zigzagging discovery here.

 

In Hubbl, you can explore apps by popular tags, you can view those trending in the news, or you can view the stream of the apps your friends recommend within different sections of the platform (“Explore,” “Buzz,” “Stream”). However, the game element comes into play under “Contests.” Every day, Hubbl will have a contest where users submit or vote on the most appropriate tag for a given app. The first person to submit the winning tag gets a $15 iTunes Gift Card. The idea here is to create an incentive to classify the newly added apps – not the Evernotes and Instagrams, necessarily, but those that aren’t yet tagged.

 

Hubbl says that the contests are needed because people get tired of curation after some point, and it’s difficult to maintain a network around app organization and friends’ recommendations when people stop participating. With contests, users are encouraged to return the app and to help Hubbl continue to classify the new additions. The contests would also be open to sponsorship, too, allowing app publishers to take over the contest for the day and offer their own award for help in picking out the best tags for their app, as well.

 

It’s an interesting concept to use a gamification element to encourage repeat visits to an app discovery platform, and people certainly like to win stuff, so it could catch on. However, Hubbl isn’t quite ready yet for its big debut – that’s still a few weeks out - so it’ s hard to review the experience based on what we can test right now. Final judgement is on hold.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Gamified courses from Course Hero and Bunchball boost student engagement

Gamified courses from Course Hero and Bunchball boost student engagement | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
In some circles, the phrase “gamification” may have gone out of fashion but, with help from Bunchball, Course Hero is intent on showing that it can still pack a punch in education and released some data to illustrate its point.

 

On average, users spend three times more time on the gamified courses than on all of CourseHero.com and total time on the platform has increased five percent since the Bunchball integration, Course Hero reported. The company also said that social sharing of achievements, which are awarded as students progress through the courses, has climbed nearly 400 percent since the Bunchball partnership.

 

These results only revealed student engagement, not retention of material, and in the future I’d be curious to see more data showing how gamification really contributes to learning. Other innovators in education, such as Khan Academy, recognize that while gamification can be incorrectly integrated with education, when incorporated in the right ways, game mechanics can be a positive force in learning.

 

Read this blog post from Ki Mae Heussner.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Spigit Offers ICON as Free Service to Expand Crowdsourcing

Spigit Offers ICON as Free Service to Expand Crowdsourcing | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Spigit has launched ICON as a free service to promote the use of mass crowdsourcing with the purpose of innovation and growth. It combines best practices and knowledge gained from delivering Spigit’s solutions to the market. It lets employees connect with their entire organization by posing questions and challenges and getting immediate feedback from coworkers.

 

ICON presents a serious of questions or challenges. You can decide which ones to take on. Contrary to typical voting mechanisms every idea in ICON gets equal assessment as coworkers and employees engage in a pair-wise comparison game of selecting this one or that one. The solutions the crowd finds valuable then bubble to the top of the leaderboard. There is room for comments and the forced choice method allows for more precise comparisons. Once you decide between one pair, a new one comes up to further refine your perspective. Over time you get a rank order of answers for an individual and for a group. 

 

There is also a gamification aspect as users can earn points and top leaderboard status by posting challenges, voting, commenting and “gifting.” The screen also shows the top answers, the top experts (people most active), and the question activity. The latter is an activity stream for a question so you can track what is happening. The system is dynamic and is constantly being updated based on new input. As an idea moves to the top, an alert is sent to the activity stream. You can also see who is voting and when this occurs.

more...
No comment yet.