Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
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Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
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Is technology making things too easy?

Is technology making things too easy? | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Do you remember when you had to remember everything yourself? No?  Well, if you’ve forgotten those days, don’t worry, because they aren’t coming back.

 

If you’ve perfected your relationship with technology, then the memory on your smartphone means that you should never miss an appointment, lose someone’s contact details, or struggle to remember an important detail again. Mobile technology gives you perfect recall, freeing up your precious brainpower for other things.

 

But is all this advanced technology making things a little bit too easy? Is the fact that we almost always have an internet-connected device to hand making us lazy?

 

In a study conducted at Columbia University, subjects were asked to type facts and trivia into a computer. Half of the subjects were told that the information would be saved, while the other half were told it would be erased. The group who were told it would be erased were significantly more likely to remember the information.

 

In another test, they were asked to remember a trivia statement and which of five computer folders it was saved in on the computer; the subjects found it easier to recall the folder than the fact.

 

The researchers concluded that the internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory. (Transactive memory is a kind of collective external memory – it used to be the ‘group mind’ of a family, group, or team, but is increasingly being replaced by the web itself; our collective recollections stored on the omnipresent cloud.)

 

 

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Online Optimism » American Scientist

Online Optimism » American Scientist | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman have written an excellent new book on the effect of the ubiquitous Internet on society, using information on the latest Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. In Networked: The New Social Operating System, the authors describe a “triple revolution” brought on by ICTs (information and communication technologies) and comprising social networking, the Internet and mobile information technology.

The technologies of the triple revolution, the authors write, allow us to connect with a larger, more diverse network, including close and distant friends and acquaintances. They make it possible to gather new and useful information in quantities and at speeds heretofore not experienced by humans. And they let people connect with others while on the go, meaning we are accessible in a way that only emergency personnel doing shift work used to be. The result of these frequently discussed changes, according to Rainie and Wellman, is a new framework—or “social operating system,” as they put it—which they call “networked individualism.” The new system has four central traits:

The social network operating system is "Personal"—the individual is at the autonomous center just as she is reaching out from her computer; "Multiuser"—people are interacting with numerous diverse others; "Multitasking"—people are doing several things; and "Multithreaded"—they are doing them more or less simultaneously. This system, they write, is encouraging the formation of new kinds of community that serve people well.

The conclusions the authors draw run counter to the pessimistic ruminations of much of the older intellectual world, who see people drawing apart from one another while glued to their computers and mobile phones. In contrast, Networked is dedicated to the proposition that the new social operating system empowers individuals by allowing them to reach out to close and distant friends, even strangers, in a way that small-group–oriented communities never allowed.
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