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Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
Curated by Huey O'Brien
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Five Ways Social Media Has Forever Changed the Way We Work

Five Ways Social Media Has Forever Changed the Way We Work | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Collective intelligence

Organizations have the ability to leverage the experience and wisdom of an entire workforce to solve a problem or identify an opportunity instead of just relying on a specific team. After speaking at a conference recently someone from a large oil and gas company told me how they couldn't solve a problem of a drill melting at extremely hot temperatures. They posed the problem on their collaborative platform for the thousands of other employees to try to solve and received a solution which was worth over a billion dollars.

 

Serendipity

Being able to come across a person or piece of information that can be used to improve a situation is a valuable thing. Organizations who deploy collaborative solutions greatly improve the chances of this happening. Employees have the ability to discover information which they can contribute to in a positive way. Lowe's Home Improvement saw this first hand when an employee asked for more of a product to be delivered to a store which other stores were not selling much of. Eventually this employee shared a demo she was doing at one of her stores to sell out of the product and other locations quickly followed. This employee who was asking for additional product happened to share her demo which resulted in over a million dollars in additional revenue.

 

Easy to find people and information

Email and static intranets are the default forms of communication and collaboration within many organizations. This leads to around 25-30 percent of an employees work week spent in front of email and a large amount of duplicated content. Enterprise collaboration platforms have enabled a much more effective way to find people and information. A way which is self-sufficient (meaning you don't need to ask anyone for anything) and empowering to the employees.

 

Anyone can be a leader and employees have a voice

When most employees think of a leader at their company they typically think of an executive. Social media has changed what it means to be a leader. Employees now have a voice where they can share their ideas for anyone within the company to see and read. These employees have the ability to become leaders in their own right on any topic that they care about. One of the world's largest consulting firms in the world (hundreds of thousands of employees around the world) has seen this happen first hand where junior and mid-level employees have the most widely followed internal blogs in the company. These employees are not executives but they are leaders with a voice that everyone listens to.

 

Transparency and flatness

Most organizations in the world are hierarchical and not transparent. It's analogous to climbing a ladder where only the first few rungs are visible and the rest are hidden. This is changing and many organizations are no longer using this as the way to work. Employees (including managers and executives) are now sharing what they are working on, how they are feeling, who they are meeting with, and what is happening with their department or the company as a whole in a discoverable and public way. There is greater insight for employees to understand not just what is happening in their organization but how their individual contributions are impacting something greater. 

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The Importance Of The Evolution Of Education

The Importance Of The Evolution Of Education | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

The creation of the Internet has had an immense impact upon the way in which we seek to learn and teach and indeed revolutionized our entire perspective of education itself.

 

JUST IN TIME LEARNING

 

In the information age there is a drive to determine different methods of functioning by using non-standardized methodologies and experimenting to determine the most efficient decision making approach. The impact of this development is that it has become imperative, now more so than ever, to acquire correct information in due time.

 

VALUE MULTIPLIER

 

The volume of information engaged by individuals has also risen exponentially with the advent of the internet. Subsequently, the utilization, management and storing of this information has become more advanced and sophisticated with developments in technology allowing greater avenues for storage and accessibility. In order to be able to operate these new technologies the acquiring of technical and professional ability to manage this has also become necessary. Thus, information has become a very important asset and property for both organizations and individuals with the greater amount of research done on the issue leading to improved relevance and value of the information.

 

CONTINUOUS AND LIFELONG LEARNING

 

In order to be abreast the latest information and practices pertaining to any field, students would require both a strong academic base and constant enhancement of the acquired knowledge. The former is perhaps most effectively provided by the conventional means of education that is imparted through regular studies from full time courses. The latter, however, cannot be provided for in same way as the former as career requirements would make it very difficult to engage in full time learning. This is where e-learning and m-learning come in. By allowing the teacher and student to be connected without having to be physically present around each other, modern technologies allow for the possibility rapid and possibly lifelong learning. This works best for professionals who wish to enhance their qualifications while at the same time maintain a professional career.

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The 7 Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today

The 7 Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

1. Digital & Research Literacy

 

Digital literacy is a trend that involves the consumption, comprehension, and curation of digital media. This is directly tied to research literacy, as both digital and digitized data sources serve as primary research resources.

 

2. Shift From Standards To Habits

 

The shift from purely academic standards to critical thinking habits supports personalized, 21st century learning through a preceding shift from institution to learner.

 

3. Game-Based Learning & Gamification

 

Game-Based Learning aggregates the power of learning simulations, social gaming, emotional immersion, and digital literacy to produce a net effect of transparency and participation on the learner.

 

4. Connectivism

 

Through social media, mobile learning, blended learning, eLearning, and other inherently connected learning experiences, it is possible to leverage the potential of interdependence and crowds. This occurs simply through crowdsourced knowledge (e.g., Quora, Wikipedia, learnist), visually through curation (e.g., scoopit, pinterest, MentorMob), and long-term through digital communities (e.g., twitter, Google+, facebook).

 

5. Transparency

 

A natural consequence of digital and social media, transparency is the opposite of closed, traditional schooling, where the walls of the classroom are thick and the local teachers and policies govern, judge, and process everything.

 

6. Place-Based Education 

 

Place-Based Education complements digital platforms that tend towards globalization. While it is tempting for learners to constantly connect with exotic ideas in equally exotic locations, authentic learning experiences allow learners to self-direct personal change in pursuit of social change–and that starts small, at home and surrounding intimate communities.

 

7. Self-Directed Learning & Play

 

Self-Directed Learning is almost certainly at the core of the future of learning. To not allow learners to “play” with information, platforms, and ideas is to ignore the access, tools, and patterns of 21st century life.

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Mozilla Launches Open Badges 1.0, A New Standard to Recognize and Verify Online Learning and Education

Mozilla Launches Open Badges 1.0, A New Standard to Recognize and Verify Online Learning and Education | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

As web-based learning platforms proliferate, and education increasingly happens in formal and informal settings and in both real and virtual classrooms, there is a growing need for a new form of credentialing that reflects these changes. Traditional, paper-based diplomas and certificates are no longer enough, but designing a meaningful, universal replacement for the old standard doesn’t happen over night. Luckily, Mozilla is on the case.

 

The Open Badges framework is designed to allow any learner to collect badges from multiple sites, tied to a single identity, and then share them out across various sites, including personal blogs to social networking channels. It is critical for this infrastructure to be open to give learners control over their own learning and credentials, allow anyone to issue badges, and for each learner to carry their badges with them across the Web and other contexts.

 

Its goals further elucidate Mozilla’s mission, which is simply to provide a system “for alternative accreditation, credentialing, and recognition” and help those alternative credentials “expand beyond siloed environments to be broadly shareable” and to “truly support learners learning everywhere.

 

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15 Ways Digital Learning Can Lead To Deeper Learning

15 Ways Digital Learning Can Lead To Deeper Learning | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Let's say you start digital learning by encouraging students to use Animoto or just use a device in the classroom. Then what?
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How to Help Mobile Education Go Global

How to Help Mobile Education Go Global | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

For many of us, the conversation around mobile learning has shifted from asking whether mobile devices present educational opportunities to how they might best do so.

 

From that second question, a new initiative has been launched: SMILE, the Stanford Mobile Inquiry Learning Environment, an idea, which, in practice, is almost staggeringly simple. Essentially, SMILE is a learning management system that allows students to create, share, answer, and evaluate questions in a collaborative manner through the use of cell phones.

 

Students use mobile devices — typically android phones that are connected to the same network — to create their own multiple-choice questions about a given topic. Their classmates answer those questions, and evaluate them based on their difficulty. While the devices need to be connected to each other, they don’t necessarily need to be connected to the outside Web, which is a key issue for some communities around the globe, said Paul Kim, the assistant dean and chief technology officer of Stanford University’s Office of Innovation & Technology and SMILE’s creator.

 

The drive to make questions that score higher on their peers’ difficulty index ultimately spurs students to think about the subject material in a deeper way, Kim says. And while there are some shortcomings—such as the lack of allowance for longer-form responses like written answers and essays, and a reliance mostly on more simple content elements such as texts and still photographs—the system’s simpleness allows it to be used in a variety of educational environments, ranging from a rural village in southern Africa to a medical school classroom at Stanford itself.

 

But creating such a project is one thing. Actually putting it into practice is another. So Kim, who has also helped launch SMILE in India, Argentina, and suburban Northern California, shares some of his tactics and lessons learned about how best to launch this project even in communities that are unlikely to have Internet access — or sometimes even electricity.

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iTunes U hits 1 billion downloads

iTunes U hits 1 billion downloads | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

That old college try seems to be working. Content downloads from iTunes U have surpassed 1 billion.

 

Apple today announced the passing of the milestone for the repository of free educational content from schools, libraries, museums, and other sources. iTunes U hosts more than 2,500 public and thousands of private courses from over 1,200 universities and colleges, and 1,200 K-12 schools and districts.

 

"There are now iTunes U courses with more than 250,000 students enrolled in them, which is a phenomenal shift in the way we teach and learn," Eddy Cue, Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, said in a statement.

 

The service is widely used around the world. More than 60 percent of app downloads from iTunes U come from outside the United States, Apple said.

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Sokikom Wants To Use Social, MMO Gaming To Help Kids Learn Math

Sokikom Wants To Use Social, MMO Gaming To Help Kids Learn Math | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

The cool part about Sokikom, which sets it apart from other cool animated, learning gameslike MindSnacks is that it’s a MMO, allowing an entire class of students to play the same math game in realtime, where half of the class on the Red Team, and the other is on the Blue Team, for example. The teams can play a game for three minutes, in which the one with the highest cumulative score wins. Patel says that, beyond being fun for students, it actually has utility in terms of improving the learning experience.

 

MMOs are, by nature, social, so rather than the typical classroom scenario where the more advanced students can actually help other students get up to speed, the idea is to create an experience where students help each other learn math naturally to help lead their teams to victory. In addition, the fact of the matter is that math can be a little dry (sometimes an all out Snooze Fest), and it’s tough to get young students excited about it and motivated to study its core concepts. But Sokikom has found in classroom tests that students care more about how they perform in game settings because they feel that they can be active contributors to the success of the team. That means higher motivation, thanks to serving the bitter Math pill with a more sugary coating.

 

The other piece of Sokikom’s equation, which teachers (and users) can set up separately from its math program (read: Game world) or use in combination, is its classroom management tool.Tackling the same problem as startups like ClassDojo, Sokikom helps teachers try to get rowdy classrooms under control by, simply put, reinforcing positive, in-class behavior. When students aren’t acting a-fool, the service allows them to earn “class cash” that they can spend on virtual rewards in its game world.

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The effective collective: Grouping could ensure animals find their way in changing environment

The effective collective: Grouping could ensure animals find their way in changing environment | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Princeton University researchers report in the journal Science that collective intelligence is vital to certain animals' ability to evaluate and respond to their environment. Conducted on fish, the research demonstrated that small groups and individuals become disoriented in complex, changing environments.

 

However, as group size is increased, the fish suddenly became highly responsive to their surroundings. These results should prompt a close examination of how endangered group or herd animals are preserved and managed, said senior researcher Iain Couzin, a Princeton professor of ecology and evolutionary biology. If wild animals depend on collective intelligence for migration, breeding and locating essential resources, they could be imperiled by any activity that diminishes or divides the group, such as overhunting and habitat loss, he explained.

 

The work is among the first to experimentally explain the extent to which collective intelligence improves awareness of complex environments, the researchers write. Collective intelligence is an established advantage of groups, including humans. As it's understood, a group of individuals gain an advantage by pooling imperfect estimates with those around them, which more or less "averages" single experiences into surprisingly accurate common knowledge. For instance, the paper in Science cites a 1907 study that predicted with near precision the weight of an ox based on the estimates of 787 people.       

 

With their work, Couzin and his coauthors uncovered an additional layer to understanding collective intelligence. The conventional view assumes that individual group members have some level of knowledge albeit incomplete. Yet the Princeton researchers found that in some cases individuals have no ability to estimate how a problem needs to be solved, while the group as a whole can find a solution through their social interactions. Moreover, they found that the more numerous the neighbors, the richer the individual—and thus group—knowledge is. These findings correlate with recent research showing that collective intelligence—even in humans—can rely less on the intelligence of each group member than on the effectiveness of their communal interaction, Couzin said. In humans, research suggests that such cooperation would take the form of open and equal communication among individuals regardless of their respective smarts, he said.

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U.K. MOOCs Alliance, Futurelearn, Adds Five More Universities And The British Library — Now Backed By 18 Partners

U.K. MOOCs Alliance, Futurelearn, Adds Five More Universities And The British Library — Now Backed By 18 Partners | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Futurelearn, the U.K.’s first large-scale alliance between traditional higher education institutions aimed at testing the waters of MOOCs (massively open online courses), has bolstered the number of partners signed up to offer free courses. Five more universities are joining the original 12 announced last December, along with the British Library — which has signed an agreement with Futurelearn to develop online courses using BL resources.

 

The British Library’s addition to the roster is interesting, being as, although it runs some workshops and training courses, it’s not a traditional higher education institution — underlining how MOOCs’ campus-less, remotely delivered education model broadens the pool of potential education providers, as well as widening access for students.

 

The five new university signs-up to Futurelearn are the universities of Bath, Leicester, Nottingham, Queen’s Belfast and Reading. The original 12 who formed Futurelearn are:  Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, East Anglia, Exeter, King’s College London, Lancaster, Leeds,  Southampton, St Andrews and Warwick, along with UK distance-learning organization The Open University (OU).

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Social Learning

People learn from each other informally all the time – Now, only more so.

 

The advent of Web 2.0 technologies and social media has led to the evolution of a variety of tools to participate in Social Learning. Social learning comes in a variety of flavors and is not limited to the course/lesson structures associated with traditional formalized learning. The infographic displays social learning types

 

 

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Kristie's curator insight, February 25, 9:49 PM

Great graphic displaying social learning types.

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Online Education Is Replacing Physical Colleges At A Crazy Fast Pace

Online Education Is Replacing Physical Colleges At A Crazy Fast Pace | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Educators knew the online revolution would eventually envelop the physical classroom, but a torrent of near-revolutionary developments in the past month are proving that change is coming quicker than anyone imagined. In just 30 days, the largest school system in the U.S. began offering credit for online courses, a major university began awarding degreeswithout any class time required, and scores of public universities are moving their courses online. The point at which online higher education becomes mainstream is no longer in some fuzzy hypothetical future; the next president’s Secretary of Education will need an entire department dedicated to the massive transition.

 

For over a decade, admissions-selective universities (e.g. not the University of Phoenix) resisted giving credit for their overwhelmingly popular online courses. Established with just 50 free online courses as a proof-of-concept, MIT’s groundbreaking Open CourseWare project quickly expanded to 1,700 courses through a worldwide consortium of universities in just three years. To date, MIT’s Open Courseware has a staggering 125 million lifetime visitors. Online education startup Coursera, which added interactive video, homework, and peer learning communities to courses from top-tier universities, has amassed more than 2.5 million users in only nine months since its debut in April 2012.

 

Then, last month, the California State University System, the financially broken/largest education system in world, swung open the gates, piloting a few online courses for credit, at the super-low cost of $150 per course. Earlier this year, I attempted to predict how California’s partnership with online course provider ,Udacity, would succeed and cascade into a movement that would radically replace most of the physical college experience.

 

I was wrong about one thing: the otherwise scientifically prudent community of higher education didn’t wait to see if the pilot was successful. Just three weeks after California’s announcement, The American Council on Education, a consortium of roughly 1,800 accredited universities, announced it was also piloting cheap online science courses at three more universities, including Duke and the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Perhaps most disruptive of all, the University of Wisconsin is offering a fully legitimate college degree without any class time required. So long as students can pass some tests (and pay the associated costs), they can learn from anywhere in the world.

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Social Media: Pulse of the Planet?

Social Media: Pulse of the Planet? | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

In 2010, Hillary Clinton described social media as a new nervous system for our planet. So can the pulse of the planet be captured by looking at social media activity?

 

There are many who are skeptical not least because of the digital divide: “You mean the pulse of the Data Have’s? The pulse of the affluent?” These rhetorical questions are perfectly justified, which is why social media alone should not be the sole source of information that feeds into decision-making for policy purposes. But millions are joining the social media ecosystem everyday, so the selection bias is not increasing but decreasing. We may not be able to capture the pulse of the planet comprehensively at a very high resolution yet, but the pulse of the majority of the world is certainly growing louder by the day.


One may think this picture depicts electricity use in Europe. Instead, this is a map of geo-located tweets (blue dots) and Flickr pictures (red dots). “White dots are locations that have been posted to both” . The number of active Twitter users grew 40% in 2012, making Twitter the fastest growing social network on the planet. Over 20% of the world’s internet population is now on Twitter. 

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LEARNING AND COGNITION

LEARNING AND COGNITION | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
DESIGN OF EFFECTIVE LEARNING FOR THE BRAIN / MIND:


Thoughts and Research on Neuroeducation Science
Huey O'Brien's insight:

Created a new Scoop.it!  pertaining to useful research, studies, and findings in neuroscience and the study of cognition as related to learning.

 

Instructional systems design practitioners apply learning and cognitive research in the design of training and education programs.  This is done in order to maximize learning performance. 

 

LEARNING AND COGNITION
 

http://www.scoop.it/t/learning-and-cognition

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Google Keep

Google may be axing Reader, but that isn’t stopping the search giant from opening new doors on the web and in the cloud. As an expansion of its Dropbox rival, Google Drive, the search giant has launched an Evernote rival: Google Keep.

 

Like Evernote, Google Keep centers around quick note-taking – and the various bells and whistles that go along with that: including checklists, photo and voice notes, and annotations. The ability to color-code notes is a handy bonus, and adds to the app's aesthetic appeal.

 

In terms of raw function, there isn’t a lot to differentiate Keep from Evernote, but one big draw here is Google Drive integration. If you already use Drive for file syncing and word processing, your Keep notes will live in the same cloud, alongside your other content.

 

In addition to the web portal for Keep, Google has already pushed out anAndroid app. Keep for Android lets you drop a widget on your homescreen for ultra-quick note-taking. There’s even a lockscreen widget, to help you jot down your thoughts with the bare minimum of effort.

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BBC - The Code - The Wisdom of the Crowd

BBC's prof. Marcus du Sautoy explains how a group of people know more than one individual (Collective Intelligence). Amazing stuff! 

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A Billion Brains are Better Than One

MIT Sloan's Thomas W. Malone, author of The Future of Work, on how the smartest companies will use emerging technology to tap the power of collective intelli...
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Can a mobile game help find the cure for cancer? Amazon, Google and Facebook hope so

Can a mobile game help find the cure for cancer? Amazon, Google and Facebook hope so | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

We already know that data is integral to finding the cure for cancer, but some of that data needs the attention of human rather than machine eyes to be properly interpreted. To that end, the charity Cancer Research UK has teamed up with Amazon, Facebook and Google to create a mobile game for analysing genetic mutations.

 

The aim of the game is simply to harness more eyes – cancer researchers already trawl through genetic data to try to pick up on subtle irregularities, but the task would be a lot easier if more people were involved. The charity has already created a web-based game called Cell Slider for looking through archived tissue samples, but the new game is supposed to make the search for a cure more fun, and more suitable for on-the-go usage.

 

Cancer Research UK is holding a hackathon called GameJam this weekend, at which 40 coders – including Facebook engineers — gamers, graphic designers and “other specialists” will hopefully come up with a suitable format — the goal is a game that can be played for just 5 minutes at a time. The result will be hosted on Amazon Web Services, and Google is hosting the event and providing financial support for the scheme.

 

“We’re making great progress in understanding the genetic reasons cancer develops. But the clues to why some drugs will work and some won’t, are held in data which need to be analysed by the human eye – and this could take years,”  said Professor Carlos Caldas, senior group leader at Cancer Research UK’s University of Cambridge facility, in a statement.

 

“By harnessing the collective power of citizen scientists we’ll accelerate the discovery of new ways to diagnose and treat cancer much more precisely.”

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Technological telepathy: brain-to-brain communication achieved

Technological telepathy: brain-to-brain communication achieved | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Telepathy has long been a subject of controversy in physical and psychological circles, offering the potential for removing the material and sensory walls between individuals, and allowing the direct transmission of information without using any of our known sensory channels or physical interactions. Although true telepathy still appears to be pseudoscience, futurists have long predicted that some form of technologically-based telepathy would eventually emerge ... and, it would appear, it has.

 

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina in the U.S. report in the February 28, 2013 issue of Scientific Reports the successful wiring together of sensory areas in the brains of two rats. The result of the experiment is that one rat will respond to the experiences to which the other is exposed.

 

Neurobiologist Miguel Nicolelis and his colleagues have been experimenting with direct electrical stimulation of sensory areas in an attempt to extend the reach of our senses. "Our previous studies with brain-machine interfaces had convinced us that the brain was much more plastic than we had thought," said Nicolelis. "In those experiments, the brain was able to adapt easily to accept input from devices outside the body and even learn how to process invisible infrared light detected by an artificial sensor. So, the question we asked was, if the brain could assimilate signals from artificial sensors, could it also assimilate information input from sensors from a different body."

 

The Duke University group is pushing forward with additional experiments, most notably by trying to interconnect several rats at once. The main question is if emergent properties might come out of such a "brain-net," perhaps leading to mental abilities not possessed by any one rat. Professor Nicolelis even suggests that an "organic computer" capable of solving puzzles in a non-Turing way might emerge from a brain-net, which could avoid many of the limitations of traditional computing systems.

 

Whatever the future holds, what has already been accomplished is worth a certain amount of wonder. Imagine what it might feel like to be a unit in a multiform brain having many bodies. The benefits and potential dangers of such entities deserves contemplation.

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India looks to have passed the US to become Quora’s top source of traffic

India looks to have passed the US to become Quora’s top source of traffic | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Question-and-answer site Quora is doing well in India after reportedly passing the US as its top source of traffic, as noticed by Next Big What.

According to Alexa, India represents 30.8% of traffic, compared to 21.8% from the US. The UK, Canada and China round out the top five.

 

Next Big What speculates that the Indian population’s interest in Quora comes from two segments: entrepreneurs and college students. Integration with Facebook is also believed to have spurred adoption in the country. At the end of 2012, there were 71 million Facebook users in India.

 

Of course, India’s population of 1.2 billion is a strong reason for the high traffic, but China, which has an even larger population, contributes less than 1/10th the traffic that India does, according to Alexa.

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The Potentially World-Changing New Feature in Google's Project Glass

The Potentially World-Changing New Feature in Google's Project Glass | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Google Glass posted a new video today, inching ever closer to a real product. The video might not show the final user interface, but this is the first time that we’re seeing something that looks realistic, usable, and practical. 

 

Unobtrusive is the watchword here. Most of the action takes place in the upper-right hand corner of your field of vision with simple, translucent text and pictures. The gist is this: you say “ok glass, (do a thing)” and it does. We see people making calls, taking pictures, looking up Wikipedia articles, reading directions and more. Most of these people are doing much cooler things than we will ever do – Kendo, fire juggling and hot-air ballooning, for a few – but one can imagine the practicality even in our own boring lives.

 

There’s one feature in there that stands out – translation. In the video, we see a simple test. A man asks Glass for a single word translation, and it speaks it to him. In that basic form, translation is straightforward, practical, and fun. But imagining the potential of carrying around a robust, effective translator with us wherever you go has dizzying implications. Instant translation with Glass, if it could be made to work, has the potential to be a world-changing technology. Maybe there could be a more functional version of “Word Lens,” translating signs wherever you look. In a true vision of a sci-fi future, you could imagine someone speaking to you and the text appearing on screen. Or even being spoken to you with a bone-conduction speaker. Realizing just a small portion of those fantasies could break apart barriers and further shrink the world, in a good way.

Huey O'Brien's insight:

How it Feels (through Glass) Video:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=v1uyQZNg2vE

 

Glass Website:

 

http://www.google.com/glass/start/

 

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Wikipedia expects to offer SMS-based access within months

Wikipedia expects to offer SMS-based access within months | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Wikipedia has long been pushing for access to its communal knowledge among those who can't afford the latest technology, going so far as to strike deals with carriers to deliver free mobile web viewing.

 

It's set to expand that reach to those for whom any advanced cellphone is out of the question. In part through the help of a Knight News Challenge grant and South Africa's Praekelt Foundation, the non-profit's Wikipedia Zero effort will offer its content through SMS and USSD messages in the next few months. Curious users will just have to send a text message to get an article in response, with no web required at all.

 

It's a big step forward for democratizing online information for those who may not even have access to a smartphone, although we're curious as to how it will handle large articles; we can only imagine the volume of messages when trying to look up the known universe.

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How Learning Analytics Are Being Used In Education

How Learning Analytics Are Being Used In Education | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

>>The Glass Classroom

 

Santa Monica College’s Glass Classroom initiative strives to enhance student and teacher performance through the collection and analysis of large amounts of data. Using real-time feedback, adaptive courseware adjusts based on an individual’s performance in the classroom in order to meet educational objectives.

 

>>jPoll at Griffith University

 

jPoll is an enterprise-wide tool developed by Griffith University in Australia, directed at capturing, maintaining, and engaging students in a range of interactive teaching situations. Originally developed as a replacement for clicker-type technologies, jPoll is helping educators identify problem areas for students via learning analytics.

 

>>Learning Analytics Seminars

 

At the University of Michigan, Provost Phil Hanlon launched the Learning Analytics Task Force (LATF), to help faculty better leverage instructional data. As part of the LATF, a series of seminars was developed to help train the faculty on current learning analytics tools and strategies for managing the growing amount of student data.

 

>>Predictive Learning Analytics Framework

 

The American Public University System is working with Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education’s Cooperative for Educational Technologies to share a large data pool of student records across ten universities. Their goal is for this data to inform strategies for improving student learning outcomes.

 

>>Stanford University’s Multimodal Learning Analytics

 

In partnership with the AT&T Foundation, Lemann Foundation, and National Science Foundation, Stanford is exploring new ways to assess project-based learning activities through students’ gestures, words, and other expressions.

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6 Technologies That Will Change Higher Education

6 Technologies That Will Change Higher Education | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

The New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) have jointly released the tenth NMC Horizon Report 2013 Higher Education Edition. This annual report describes the findings of ongoing research projects designed to identify new technologies that are likely to impact education in the coming years. In years past, crazy new-fangled items like ‘the internet’ and ‘laptop computers’ have topped the lists of would-be technology winners.

 

This year, the Horizon Report has identified 6 technologies that will change higher education.  The report identifies the technologies, and then separates them into three timeframes (called Horizons) that they think will match when each technology will enter mainstream use. 

 

Larry Johnson, chief executive officer of the NMC, released a statement about the report, saying,“Campus leaders and practitioners across the world use the report as a springboard for discussion around significant trends and challenges.” This year, “…the biggest trend identified by the advisory this year reflects the increasing adoption of openness on and beyond campuses, be it in the form of open content or easy access to data. This transition is promising, but there is now a major need for content curation.”

 

The group has identified MOOCs and tablet computing as technologies expected to enter mainstream use in the first horizon (timeframe of one year or less), games/gamification and learning analytics for the second horizon (two to three years), and 3-D printing and wearable technologies for the third horizon (4-5 years).

 

Huey O'Brien's insight:

Download the Report from this link:

http://www.nmc.org/publications/2013-horizon-report-higher-ed

 

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There Will Be More Smartphones Than Humans on the Planet by Year's End

There Will Be More Smartphones Than Humans on the Planet by Year's End | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

A prediction for the future of smartphone growth makes some bold projections: By the end of this year, there could be more smartphones on the planet than humans, and by 2016 there could be 10 billion smartphones. That's 1.4 mobile devices per capita.

 

In its global mobile data traffic forecast, Cisco predicts that a solid chunk of growth will come from the Middle East and Africa, with a compound annual growth rate of 104%, followed by Asia Pacific with 84% growth.

 

What will people be doing with their smartphones in the coming years? Cisco predicts that by 2016 two-thirds of the world's mobile data traffic will be from videos, increasing 25-fold between now and then. Mobile network connection speeds will increase as well, according to the company.

Huey O'Brien's insight:

Also see: Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update, 2012–2017

 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns525/ns537/ns705/ns827/white_paper_c11-520862.html

 

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