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Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
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Explania: A Useful Source For Free Educational Videos

Explania: A Useful Source For Free Educational Videos | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Explania Offers Free Educational Videos for your classroom on a variety of topics. Videos are animations to help explain a topic or take you step by step on a how-to.

 

Whether or not you prescribe to the idea that there are different types of learners  there are some scenarios in which a visual explanation is extremely helpful in understanding the subject matter at hand. I stumbled upon a site the other day that offers a number of free educational videos that can be useful to teachers who are addressing certain subject matters.

 

Explania describes itself as a place to watch “hundreds of animated explanations, interactive tutorials and instructional videos, and feel free to embed them on your own web pages.” It is free to watch and embed the videos, so if you find one useful, you can easily share it with your classes or even on a class website. Many of the videos are technology how-tos, which may not be useful for your class, but can help you teach your mom to use Twitter, for example. For classroom use, the ‘health’ and ‘ecology’ channels are probably the most likely to contain content that will overlap with classroom topics, but the technology sections are definitely worth checking out – either to find something new for yourself or to help you teach your students to use something new in class.

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Google Search Starts To Reward Curators, Collections and Quality Lists

In the overall effort to improve the quality of its search result pages, Google is continuing to make significant improvements to its search engine.  Improvements include social discovery and content curation.

Starting from now on, all users worldwide can see Knowledge Graph results showing up on top of search results as a browseable list of alternative options to explore. Additionally, Google is officially going after the gathering and curation of Best Lists, Collections, and Guides on just about any topic. 


From the official Google Blog: "Finally, the best answer to your question is not always a single entity, but a list or group of connected things. It’s quite challenging to pull these lists automatically from the web. But we’re now beginning to do just that. So when you search for [california lighthouses], [hurricanes in 2008] or [famous female astronomers], we’ll show you a list of these things across the top of the page. And by combining our Knowledge Graph with the collective wisdom of the web, we can even provide more subjective lists like [best action movies of the 2000s] or [things to do in paris]."

 

Read more about it:

 

http://googleblog.blogspot.it/2012/08/building-search-engine-of-future-one.html

 

 


Via Robin Good
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Prasanth (WN)'s comment, August 10, 2012 10:23 AM
Thanks
Archeology Rome's comment, August 10, 2012 10:24 AM
Interesting, thanks.
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New iPad App May Be The Future Of Collaborative Online Learning

New iPad App May Be The Future Of Collaborative Online Learning | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
A startup wants to turn video lessons into something more interactive and immersive. It's like a Skype chat on steroids. Harvard Professor Michael Sandel is on board and his popular video lectures are now in a must-see iPad app.

 

One of the biggest problems many people have with Khan Academy and YouTube Edu is simply the format. It’s not the fault of Khan or YouTube … it’s just that the passive video format is just that. It’s passive. Khan and others are introducing more interactive technology that acts as an added level of learning to the lessons but no one has nailed it quite yet.

 

A San Francisco-based startup called Net Power & Light Inc. wants to change that. And they’re working with one of the most popular (in terms of YouTube views at least) Harvard professors to show off what they can do. Net and Professor Michael Sandel have partnered to offer a more interactive way to learn using the Apple iPad.

 

Net’s software is called ‘Spin‘ which essentially turns passive video watching into interactive group learning. It’s like project-based learning but with the entire planet instead of just your classroom. Right now, Spin lets you remix and interact with content from Harvard, Stanford, TED, and the National Geographic Channel. “Teachers felt web-based learning wasn’t giving them the full experience,” Tara Lemmey, Net Power & Light’s co-founder and chief executive officer, said in an interview. “Education shouldn’t live by itself. It’s a world of together.”

 

So How’s It Work?

 

The Spin software lets you, like any video player, fast-forward, rewind, skip chapters, and pause videos. But it’s more than that. The software overlays video conferences you’re having simultaneously with other people in your group. You can pause the video and discuss it. It’s like a collaborative Skype session with the background being an informative multimedia presentation.  Start the video, get your group to join in, watch a bit, then discuss. This could be a great tool for any distance learners or students doing PBL remotely.

 

The software also features a shared chalkboard so all the members of your group can draw right on the screen. It also lets you have individual audio controls since there will likely be more than one conversation happening simultaneously. In a fun twist, you can actually shrink or enlarge a person’s picture on the iPad screen to lower or raise their respective volume.

 

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