Collective Intell...
Follow
Find tag "MOOC"
5.2K views | +0 today
Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
Curated by Huey O'Brien
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Google Expands Role In Digital Education, Teams Up With edX To Build A YouTube For Free Online Courses

Google Expands Role In Digital Education, Teams Up With edX To Build A YouTube For Free Online Courses | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

It’s turning into a busy week for Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers, and the tech companies that love them — particularly Google. Udacity co-founder and CEO Sebastian Thrun and California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom announced the Open Education Alliance, a consortium of online organizations dedicated to closing the skills gap, developing standards for career readiness and providing the content that will help get students ready for the workforce. Google and AT&T are some of the names already endorsing the Alliance, while rumors have been circling that Coursera and other MOOC providers are on board as well. However, at this point who will be participating and what it could mean for education is still up in the air. It’s an alliance-in-progress.

 

Google also took another big step into the open courseware game, announcing a new partnership with edX — the Harvard and MIT-backed, non-profit organization that currently stands as one of the Big Three MOOC Providers, along with Udacity and Coursera. Together, the two companies plan to launch MOOC.org, a site that will allow teachers, businesses — and really anyone — to create their own digital course and share it with the world. As of now, the site is slated for launch in the first half of 2014.

 

For edX, MOOC.org represents another step towards going beyond the boundaries of its current model, which includes partnership with institutions like Harvard, MIT, Stanford and other elite universities. In April, the organization merged with Stanford University-based startup Class2Go to build an open-source version of its platform that can be used by any institution around the globe. The goal has been to allow developers access to edX’s code to allow any institution to host and distribute digital courses for on-campus and distance learners — both online and offline — and create better ways to collect student data.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Coursera partners with 10 universities for online classes

Coursera partners with 10 universities for online classes | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Online learning startup Coursera has formed partnerships with 10 public universities and university systems to develop courses that can be taken for credit either online or in a blended classroom-online environment.

 

By exploring new uses for massive open online courses (MOOCs), the partnership aims to improve the quality of the education, as well as expand access and increase graduation rates for up to 1.25 million students at the schools, the Mountain View, Calif.-based company announced Wednesday.

 

The hope is that the program will encourage new teaching methods, as well as enhancing existing approaches by creating a "blended learning" experience that combines online video lectures with on-campus instruction that stresses classroom engagement. The platform could also allow instructors to access already-developed content and adapt it to their own needs.

 

Collaborating with Coursera in the program are the State University of New York (SUNY), the Tennessee Board of Regents, University of Tennessee System, University of Colorado System, University of Houston System, University of Kentucky, University of Nebraska, University of New Mexico, University System of Georgia, and West Virginia University.


Other online education providers have already developed programs with public universities.EdX launched a not-for-profit joint venture last year with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to make education material available online for free. Udacity partnered with San Jose State University in January to offer San Jose State Plus, a pilot program that presents seemingly unlimited class size to students often hobbled by oversubscribed courses. One Udacity computer science class currently has 250,000 students enrolled.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

edX Merges With Stanford’s Class2Go To Build An Open-Source Online Learning Platform

edX Merges With Stanford’s Class2Go To Build An Open-Source Online Learning Platform | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

As new models of digital learning sweep across higher education, colleges and universities across the globe are scrambling to get on board and make their course catalogs available to a wider audience via the Web. Of these new models, few have seen more attention than massive open online courses (a.k.a. “MOOCs”), which, starting with Khan Academy, promise to offer access to quality, affordable education at scale — online.

 

Founded by eight engineers in Stanford’s CS Department, the non-profit platform committed itself to building (arguably the first) open-source MOOC platform — designed to be both free and interoperable with other platforms to encourage collaboration from teachers and other institutions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

A Quick Guide To The History Of MOOCs - Infographic

A Quick Guide To The History Of MOOCs - Infographic | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
So what is a MOOC? What's the history of MOOCs? How are they growing? What are some significant events in the world of MOOCs?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

With 4.5M Users, Instructure Takes On The Courseras & Udacities Of The World With Its Own Open Course Network

With 4.5M Users, Instructure Takes On The Courseras & Udacities Of The World With Its Own Open Course Network | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Instructure launched Canvas in 2011 to give educational institutions an alternative to the ubiquitous (but much criticized) software of educational giants like Blackboard.

 

Today, Instructure is adding another piece to its learning management system with the launch of its own MOOC hybrid called the Canvas Network. Essentially, the network allows schools to define the structure of their online courses and customize the learning experience. They can choose to offer courses in a scalable, open format (i.e. MOOC-style) or pursue a smaller, more closed model, in which courses are taught on the online platform schools already have up and running — and are tuition-based.

 

Why? Well, as you’ve likely heard, there’s a lot of attention being paid to massive open online course initiatives (MOOCs), thanks to networks like Khan Academy, Coursera, Udacity, EdX and StraighterLine, to name a few. However, in talking with schools, Instructure CEO Josh Coates tells us, they learned that, while MOOCs have seen buzz from national media, institutions still have a lot of concerns about these open course initiatives.

 

Chiefly, many schools views open course platforms as a feature, rather than the future of education and, while being necessary and integral to the democratization of access to courses and learning content, are not yet sufficient. On top of that, Coates says, schools believe that MOOCs currently privilege a one-size-fits-all approach, which fails to take into consideration the fact that each university has its own needs, and views on how to educate their students.

 

In reality, universities want flexibility and the ability to run courses the way they see fit, rather than being shoehorned into a specific model or interface. And, somewhat controversially, schools content that real innovation in education is coming not from the vendors serving institutions, but within institutions (and the system) itself.

 

That’s why the Canvas Network allows schools to offer their courses in one aggregated resource, where students already enrolled in their programs can search for and access their content and where the public (you and me) can do the same — pursue and discover courses that offer open enrollment.

 

Beginning today, students can view and register for these classes for free, choosing from an initial set of 20 courses from both Ivy League schools and community colleges. What’s available today is basically the network’s initial catalog of courses, which will begin in January 2013, but the company plans to continue expanding that catalog as it goes.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

CreativeLIVE: Free, Online Classroom For Creative Entrepreneurs

CreativeLIVE: Free, Online Classroom For Creative Entrepreneurs | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
With the rise of massive online open course platforms (a.k.a. “MOOCs”) like Khan Academy and Coursera, a new model of online learning has emerged, promising quality, affordable education at scale. This new generation of educational platforms offer alternatives to expensive degrees programs and physical classrooms in the hopes of ushering in Education 2.0 by emphasizing interactive, personalized and skill-based learning.

 

CreativeLIVE is hardly the first to attack this space. Khan, 2tor, ShowMe, Udemy, Udacity, Coursera, EdX, StraighterLine, TED, Knowmia, Educreations and many more are in a variety of ways using video and digital platforms to offer more frictionless access to continuing education and affordable learning. Collaborative learning platform SkillShare and PowHow, a startup we recently covered that is building a marketplace for live, webcam classes in subjects like fitness, cooking, music, arts, DIY, and crafting.

 

The best parallel for creativeLIVE would be Lynda.com, which has been offering a virtual video library of courses taught by industry experts since the ’90s. The company hit $70 million in revenues in 2011 and now offers over 1,200 educational, how-to videos, providing paid learning content to individuals, Ivy League schools and companies like Disney, Time Warner and Pixar. In particular, one thing that has set Lynda apart from today’s emerging DIY online video models is the fact that it produces most of its content in-house.

 

Like Lynda, creativeLIVE takes video quality seriously and has become a video production operation in addition to simply being an online distribution platform. The startup has its own studios in Seattle and San Francisco, which allow the startup to offer live, streaming classes in cable-quality, HD video, which stands out when compared to, say, the pile of user-generated how-to videos on YouTube.

 

In addition, while Lynda.com users can unlock its videos for a monthly subscription fee of $25, creativeLIVE offers its classes for free. The startup’s courses are streamed live, all of which can be accessed for no cost, and if viewers want to watch the class again, or re-watch particular sections, they can purchase the video at prices that range between $29 and $149, depending on the course.

 

CreativeLIVE’s instructors now include names like Tim Ferriss and Ramit Sethi, photography instruction from Pulitzer Prize winner Vincent Laforet and filmmaking classes by Gale Tattersall, the Director of Photography for House. But it’s less about finding celebrity teachers than it is about creating a highly curated experience with content provided by those who are best at teaching their particular subject, the company said. The real impact, going forward, will be made by those that can empower people to learn real skills to enhance their career or hobby to help them move up in their field, or turn their true passion into a day job

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Coursera reaches 1 million students worldwide

Coursera reaches 1 million students worldwide | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Online education startup Coursera, which provides free online courses taught by professors at top universities, has attracted one million enrolled students from every country in the world.

 

Coursera partners with universities and colleges around the world to offer massive open online courses (or MOOCs) taught by leading professors. Four weeks ago, it said that it’s partnering with a dozen new schools, bringing its total to 16. In addition to elite U.S. universities, including Stanford, Princeton and the University of Michigan, it has added international schools such as the University of Edinburgh, University of Toronto and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), to its list of partners.

 

Since its earliest days, Coursera has attracted international students and being available to people around the globe has been a core value of the company’s. Nearly all of the company’s 1,000 videos have been captioned into more than 20 languages and, with the addition to EPFL, the startup will offer its first non-English course, an introduction to programming taught in French.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Blackboard Announces New MOOC Platform

Blackboard Announces New MOOC Platform | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Blackboard, a company that makes software that many colleges use to run their classroom and online courses, announced on Wednesday that it was expanding its support for MOOCs, though it is relatively late to the much-talked-about trend of massive open online courses.  “We watched really carefully, and we thought about doing something” sooner, said Ray Henderson, president of Blackboard’s teaching and learning division, in an interview this week. “This is one of those times when we said this is a watch and develop, not jump on it.”

 

The company announced at its annual conference here that it would create a new MOOC platform that colleges could use free if they were existing Blackboard customers. Many colleges looking to experiment with MOOCs have signed up for Coursera or edX, two popular platforms that are growing fast. And one of Blackboard’s competitors in the course-management software business, Instructure, already offers a MOOC platform for its customers, called Canvas Network.

 

Colleges “want this,” said Mr. Henderson, referring to support for free online courses. “If they don’t get it from us, they could get it from someone else, which initiates a new relationship that is potentially a risk to us.”  Blackboard also announced that 15 additional institutions, including Temple University’s business school and Syracuse University, plan to offer MOOCs using Blackboard’s software starting this fall. Darin Kapanjie, managing director for online and digital learning at the Temple business school, said it had decided to use Blackboard for MOOCs because the school already uses the company’s software for its online courses.

 

“Why not put students in the same environment they’re going to be in if they enroll?” he said.  Katie Blot, Blackboard’s president of global education services, said that she and other officials at the company had been hearing three main reasons from colleges to try MOOCs: to open access to education, to experiment with new teaching methods, and, as a form of marketing, to give nonstudents a taste of what the institution is like.  Mr. Kapanjie said marketing was the main reason his institution was trying a MOOC. “It’s marketing and brand awareness,” he said. “Our biggest issue is nobody knows about us,” he added, noting that the business school has offered online courses for several years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Coursera partners with Chegg and publishers to offer students free textbooks during its courses

Coursera partners with Chegg and publishers to offer students free textbooks during its courses | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Online learning startup Coursera on Wednesday announced a partnership with Chegg, a student hub for various educational tools and materials, as well as five publishers to offer students free textbooks during their courses. Professors teaching courses on Coursera have previously only been able to assign content freely available on the Web, but as of today they will also be able to provide an even wider variety of curated teaching and learning materials at no cost to the student.

 

The high-quality educational content, as the company puts it, consists of eTextbooks and supplementary materials will be delivered via Chegg’s DRM-protected eReader. The DRM limitation will allow for the content to be offered gratis only during the duration of the course.

 

The list of participating publishers includes Cengage Learning, Macmillan Higher Education, Oxford University Press, Sage, and Wiley. This is the first time these publishers have made a commitment to online education of Coursera’s caliber.

 

How did Coursera manage to convince them come on board? The massive open online course (MOOC) provider is offering them at least two deals: the insight into worldwide usage data, as well as the option to sell full versions of their eTextbooks to students for continued personal learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

U.K. MOOCs Alliance, Futurelearn, Adds Five More Universities And The British Library — Now Backed By 18 Partners

U.K. MOOCs Alliance, Futurelearn, Adds Five More Universities And The British Library — Now Backed By 18 Partners | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Futurelearn, the U.K.’s first large-scale alliance between traditional higher education institutions aimed at testing the waters of MOOCs (massively open online courses), has bolstered the number of partners signed up to offer free courses. Five more universities are joining the original 12 announced last December, along with the British Library — which has signed an agreement with Futurelearn to develop online courses using BL resources.

 

The British Library’s addition to the roster is interesting, being as, although it runs some workshops and training courses, it’s not a traditional higher education institution — underlining how MOOCs’ campus-less, remotely delivered education model broadens the pool of potential education providers, as well as widening access for students.

 

The five new university signs-up to Futurelearn are the universities of Bath, Leicester, Nottingham, Queen’s Belfast and Reading. The original 12 who formed Futurelearn are:  Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, East Anglia, Exeter, King’s College London, Lancaster, Leeds,  Southampton, St Andrews and Warwick, along with UK distance-learning organization The Open University (OU).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

CourseTalk Launches A Yelp For Open Online Courses

CourseTalk Launches A Yelp For Open Online Courses | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Today, CourseTalk is what you might expect — an early stage Yelp for MOOCs — a place for students to share their experiences with these courses and a way to discover new courses they’d enjoy. Given that it’s still nascent, the platform’s design is simple and its user experience is straightforward: Visitors can use the general search bar which is front and center, or peruse through “Top Rated,” “Popular” and “Upcoming” verticals, or search by category, like Business, Computer Science, etc.

 

The site has also begun to compile a (growing) list of the universities offering MOOCs and offers a vertical for the Top Reviewers, as well. As to which platforms it supports? Ultimately, CourseTalk wants to list all of them, but for now the focus remains on publicly available courses that anyone can take from anywhere — free or paid.

 

The platform is currently in the process of adding courses from Canvas.net as well as a bevy of classes from Khan Academy. The usual suspects — Coursera, Udacity and edX — are all there. Down the road, the founder also plans to add vertical services, such as Codecademy and Duolingo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Google's Open Course Builder: A Giant Leap into 21st-Century Online Learning

Google's Open Course Builder: A Giant Leap into 21st-Century Online Learning | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
"Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful." -- About Google

Google is the most powerful nonhuman teacher ever known to actual humans.

 

Implicitly and ceaselessly, Google performs formative assessments by collecting the following data: the content, genre and media that interests you most; when and for how long you access your external cloud brain; what your hobbies and routines are; with whom you work and communicate; who will get your November vote; and whether you prefer invigorating clean mint or enamel renewal toothpaste. By continuously refining the nuance of your sociogram, Google has already customized your next web exploration and taught itself to teach.

 

You Are Now Entering the Learning Management System

 

Months ago, Google entered the massive open online course (MOOC) space by introducing the free Power Searching with Google course to 150 thousand self-enrolled students (shocker: Google is not particularly concerned with enhancing your use of dozens of alternative search engines). More recently, Google gave away Open Course Builder -- tools that were used to construct its popular course -- and further disrupted traditional notions of who gets to play teacher (anyone) and how many students can take a class for free (1 or 100,000).

 

If you are an advanced geek, you will be able to author and publish your own e-learning space using Open Course Builder. If you don't know the difference between a .txt file and .jpg, choose a different learning management system (LMS) for now.

 

I enrolled in Power Searching to assess how Google's tools support 21st-century skills: critical thinking, collaboration, and creativity.With his gray beard and soothing demeanor, Senior Research Scientist Daniel M. Russell donned an avuncular professor role on streaming video as he explained the course's organization and tests: pre-class, midterm and culminating.

 

Online learning modules should be intuitive, persuading learners to forget that an infrastructure is unobtrusively guiding their knowledge and skill acquisition. Power Searching is pure course craftsmanship, what you might expect from a team of well-paid (and fed) content geniuses and instructional design experts.  The six 50-minutes classes were easy to navigate. An overview to each class was followed by five or six lessons featuring short introductions to content chunklets. After completing an exercise, students were invited to access supplementary resources and participate on discussion forums facilitated by teacher assistants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Huey O'Brien
Scoop.it!

Stanford Unveils Free Platform To Run Your Own Online Courses

Stanford Unveils Free Platform To Run Your Own Online Courses | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Google and Stanford are more than just neighbors in Silicon Valley. They're becoming the leaders in the online learning revolution. And it's all happening fast and starting right about ... now.

 

Google and Stanford are more than just neighbors in Silicon Valley. They’re becoming the leaders in the online learning revolution. And it’s all happening fast and starting right about … now.

 

Stanford, like Google, has now announced a free and open source platform that lets you run your very own Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Stanford’s platform, dubbed Class2Go, has big and slightly different aspirations from its competitors. Developed as a non-profit project by eight Stanford Computer Science engineers, Class2Go is meant to offer not only a course-like project but also tools for collaborative research. The latter functionality is a change from what Google, edX, Coursera, and others are offering right now.

 

The Stanford engineers say they hope to make the design and process easier to use, portable, and able to connect to other systems. In other words, it should be mobile-friendly (iPhones, iPads, Androids) and have an API. The engineers also go on to say that the problem sets used in Class2Go are the same format already in use by Khan Academy.

 

If you're not familiar with a MOOC, check out this explanatory video on YouTube:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3gMGqcZQc&feature=player_embedded

 

more...
No comment yet.