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12 Powerful PDF Tools For Teachers And Administrators

12 Powerful PDF Tools For Teachers And Administrators | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
We all seem to use PDFs every day. Here are a few powerful (and mostly free) PDF tools for teachers and admins worth trying.

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Shannon Petty's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:35 PM

Tech tools

Maureen Greenbaum's curator insight, July 20, 2013 9:35 PM

Excellent collection with goood brief decriptions

Robin Skogen's curator insight, July 25, 2013 11:23 AM

Tech help w/ PDFs

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Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Image of the World
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Jung at heart by Aviva Lori

Jung at heart by Aviva Lori | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Official launch ofThe Jung-Neumann LettersAn International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer Follow updates on FaceBook The following article appeared in...

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Periodic Table of Machine Learning Libraries

Periodic Table of Machine Learning Libraries | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

Machine Learning Libraries


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Nature

Nature | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
An excerpt from the first chapter of my new book, Intertwingled. When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe. – John Muir I'm standing on an is...

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Keith Hamon's curator insight, December 12, 2014 5:06 PM

"The more we studied, the more we came to realize how poor our previous explanations had been." We teach and learn in ecosystems, but we pretend we are still in a factory. Consequently, all our explanations are impoverished.

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Complexity in Education
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Complicated or complex - knowing the difference is important

Complicated or complex - knowing the difference is important | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Understanding the difference between complex and complicated systems is becoming important for many aspects of management and policy. With complicated problems or issues one can define the problem ...

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Keith Hamon's curator insight, June 3, 2014 7:28 AM

Discusses management & policy implications for dealing with complex issues rather than complicated issues.

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The automatic writings of Jung

The automatic writings of Jung | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Watkins’ bookstore in Cecil Court, just off Charing Cross Road in London, was founded in 1891 by John Watkins, and is still London’s premier hermetic bookstore. One of its many notorious visitors was Carl Gustav Jung, the famous Swiss psychiatrist who would, together with Freud, define the field. Watkins was later to become Jung’s publisher, bringing out the private 1925 edition of Jung’s “VII Sermones ad Mortuos”.
For a well-known psychiatrist to chose a hermetic bookstore as the publisher of a book might seem odd, and it is. The text is purportedly by “Basilides of Alexandria” and is a Gnostic text – a religious document, largely Christian in nature. Why Watkins was chosen as the publisher however becomes clear when we know that Jung had received this document via automatic writing – something most psychiatrists would push towards the lunatic fringe… but not Jung.

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The Guilt of Prometheus and Pandora’s Gifts

The Guilt of Prometheus and Pandora’s Gifts | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Jean Delville, “Prometheus”
Prometheus was one of the Titans – the gods who descended from primordial deities, and preceded Olympian gods and goddesses.

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The Bull of Heaven II

The Bull of Heaven II | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Symbol Reader:I am always happy to discover an astrological blog focusing so heavily on myth and archetype. This is an excellent read.

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Nonlinear Dynamics of the Rock-Paper-Scissors Game with Mutations

We analyze the replicator-mutator equations for the Rock-Paper-Scissors game. Various graph-theoretic patterns of mutation are considered, ranging from a single unidirectional mutation pathway between two of the species, to global bidirectional mutation among all the species. Our main result is that the coexistence state, in which all three species exist in equilibrium, can be destabilized by arbitrarily small mutation rates. After it loses stability, the coexistence state gives birth to a stable limit cycle solution created in a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. This attracting periodic solution exists for all the mutation patterns considered, and persists arbitrarily close to the limit of zero mutation rate and a zero-sum game.

 

Nonlinear Dynamics of the Rock-Paper-Scissors Game with Mutations
Danielle F. P. Toupo, Steven H. Strogatz

http://arxiv.org/abs/1502.03370


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Data Mining Reveals A Global Link Between Corruption and Wealth

Data Mining Reveals A Global Link Between Corruption and Wealth | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
One question that social scientists and economists have long puzzled over is how corruption arises in different cultures and why it is more prevalent in some countries than others. But it has always been difficult to find correlations between corruption and other measures of economic or social activity.

Michal Paulus and Ladislav Kristoufek at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic have for the first time found a correlation between the perception of corruption in different countries and their economic development.

The data they use comes from Transparency International, a non-profit campaigning organisation based in Berlin, Germany, and which defines corruption as the misuse of public power for private benefit. Each year, this organisation publishes a global list of countries ranked according to their perceived levels of corruption. The list is compiled using at least three sources of information but does not directly measure corruption, because of the difficulties in gathering such data.

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Rick Frank's curator insight, February 11, 6:08 AM

Really? Who would have guessed?

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Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing

The germline, which produces sperm or oocyte, is separated from other cells that generate the rest of the body, the soma, during early development in most animals. Somatic cells experience and respond to the environment in each generation, and it is unknown whether they can transmit information to the germline for inheritance into subsequent generations. We found that neurons of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans can transmit double-stranded RNA to the germline to initiate transgenerational silencing of a gene of matching sequence. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time that a somatic tissue of an animal can have transgenerational effects on a gene through the transport of double-stranded RNA to the germline.

 

Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing
Sindhuja Devanapally, Snusha Ravikumar, and Antony M. Jose

PNAS

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423333112


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Complexity Digest's curator insight, February 4, 2:14 PM

This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.

Vasileios Basios's curator insight, February 5, 7:52 AM
Complexity Digest's insight: This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.
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Sea Slug has Taken Genes from the Algae it Eats, Allowing it to Photosynthesize Like a Plant

Sea Slug has Taken Genes from the Algae it Eats, Allowing it to Photosynthesize Like a Plant | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

How a brilliant-green sea slug manages to live for months at a time “feeding” on sunlight, like a plant, is clarified in a recent study published in The Biological Bulletin. The authors present the first direct evidence that the emerald green sea slug’s chromosomes have some genes that come from the algae it eats. These genes help sustain photosynthetic processes inside the slug that provide it with all the food it needs. Importantly, this is one of the only known examples of functional gene transfer from one multicellular species to another, which is the goal of gene therapy to correct genetically based diseases in humans.


“Is a sea slug a good [biological model] for a human therapy? Probably not. But figuring out the mechanism of this naturally occurring gene transfer could be extremely instructive for future medical applications,” says study co-author Sidney K. Pierce, an emeritus professor at University of South Florida and at University of Maryland, College Park.


The team used an advanced imaging technique to confirm that a gene from the alga V. litorea is present on the E. chlorotica slug’s chromosome. This gene makes an enzyme that is critical to the function of photosynthetic “machines” called chloroplasts, which are typically found in plants and algae.


It has been known since the 1970s that E. chloritica “steals” chloroplasts from V. litorea (called “kleptoplasty”) and embeds them into its own digestive cells. Once inside the slug cells, the chloroplasts continue to photosynthesize for up to nine months—much longer than they would perform in the alga. The photosynthesis process produces carbohydrates and lipids, which nourish the slug.


How the slug manages to maintain these photosynthesizing organelles for so long has been the topic of intensive study and a good deal of controversy. “This paper confirms that one of several algal genes needed to repair damage to chloroplasts, and keep them functioning, is present on the slug chromosome,” Pierce says. “The gene is incorporated into the slug chromosome and transmitted to the next generation of slugs.” While the next generation must take up chloroplasts anew from algae, the genes to maintain the chloroplasts are already present in the slug genome, Pierce says.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Richard Spencer's curator insight, February 5, 6:00 AM

The  wonders  of  evolution  

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Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing

The germline, which produces sperm or oocyte, is separated from other cells that generate the rest of the body, the soma, during early development in most animals. Somatic cells experience and respond to the environment in each generation, and it is unknown whether they can transmit information to the germline for inheritance into subsequent generations. We found that neurons of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans can transmit double-stranded RNA to the germline to initiate transgenerational silencing of a gene of matching sequence. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time that a somatic tissue of an animal can have transgenerational effects on a gene through the transport of double-stranded RNA to the germline.

 

Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing
Sindhuja Devanapally, Snusha Ravikumar, and Antony M. Jose

PNAS

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423333112


Via Complexity Digest
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Complexity Digest's insight: This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.
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Complexity Digest's curator insight, February 4, 2:14 PM

This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Le sens des choses
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La capacité d'une population à innover dépend aussi de sa taille

La capacité d'une population à innover dépend aussi de sa taille | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

Dans une étude publiée par la revue Nature, une équipe de l'Institut des sciences de l'évolution de Montpellier, CNRS/IRD/Université de Montpellier 2, a prouvé par l'expérience l'hypothèse selon laquelle la taille d'une population influait directement sur sa capacité à transmettre des traits culturels. Plus une population est grande, plus elle est capable de transmettre des savoirs et des techniques mais aussi d'innover ; plus elle est petite, plus elle risque de perdre son savoir-faire et de régresser.


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Physicists make 'weather forecasts' for economies

Physicists make 'weather forecasts' for economies | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
The development of some countries is as predictable as steady winds, but for others it is more chaotic, physicists find.

Via NESS, Complexity Digest
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Breaking Research: Separable short- and long-term memories can form after a momentous occasion

Breaking Research: Separable short- and long-term memories can form after a momentous occasion | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

Imagine that you are a starving fruit fly, desperately searching for food in a new area. Suddenly, you encounter a mysterious new odor and discover a nearby source of life-sustaining food. After a single experience such as this, flies can instantly form an association between that new odor and food, and will follow the odor if it encounters it again (Figure 1-1). Yamagata et al. took advantage of this instinctual behavior to study how the fly brain stores a long-term memory after one event.

They trained groups of flies to associate a particular odor (A) with a sugar reward by presenting them with both stimuli at the same time. They confirmed that the flies formed a memory by giving them a choice between odor A and a different odor (B), and found that flies preferably flocked to an area scented with odor A.

They also identified a large group of dopamine neurons (known as PAM neurons) that were activated by the sugar reward. If the researchers activated the PAM neurons instead of providing sugar when the flies encountered odor A, the flies still associated that odor with a reward (Figure 1-2).

Now the question: how does PAM neuron activity paired with an odor form a long-term memory?  The researchers found that the PAM neurons could actually be grouped into two types. When they activated one type, which they dubbed stm-PAM, the flies only formed a short-term memory. The researchers tested their memory immediately after training and found most of the flies hanging around odor A. But 24 hours later, the memory was gone.

Surprisingly, when the researchers activated the other type of PAM neurons during training (called ltm-PAM), the flies only formed a long-term memory! The flies weren’t particularly interested in odor A immediately after training, but 24 hours later the flies flocked toward it. This incredible result showed that long-term memory doesn’t necessarily require a short-term counterpart. So, instead of the reward pathway forming a short-term memory that later transforms into a long-term memory, this sugar reward formed two complementary memories.


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Why Some Teams Are Smarter Than Others

Why Some Teams Are Smarter Than Others | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
It’s about listening, empathy and having more women.

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Keith Hamon's curator insight, January 21, 12:08 PM

Groups in organizations, including education I suspect, are smarter and make better decisions when they listen better, empathize more, and include more women—who typically listen and empathize better than men. This works for adults, but what about children? Maybe we should teach listening/empathizing skills for group work.

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The Inside and the Outside: Discovering the Reality of the Psyche

The Inside and the Outside: Discovering the Reality of the Psyche | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
A fundamental Jungian idea is that of the reality of the psyche. What is psychic reality and how does it change our experience of life when we really begin to take our inner lives seriously?

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Beyond Materialism and Idealism, a Philosophy of Organism?

Beyond Materialism and Idealism, a Philosophy of Organism? | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Levi Bryant offered some ideas about materialism earlier this week over at Larval Subjects. I read and commented on his post while screeching through the BART transbay tube on my commute home from work.

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►Greek Mythology: “Athena, Goddess of Wisdom”.-

►Greek Mythology: “Athena, Goddess of Wisdom”.- | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
“Minerva, the Goddess of Wisdom and Knowledge” by Willem De Poorter. (17th century).

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The Guilt of Prometheus and Pandora’s Gifts

The Guilt of Prometheus and Pandora’s Gifts | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
Jean Delville, “Prometheus”
Prometheus was one of the Titans – the gods who descended from primordial deities, and preceded Olympian gods and goddesses.

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Cooperate without looking: Why we care what people think and not just what they do

Evolutionary game theory typically focuses on actions but ignores motives. Here, we introduce a model that takes into account the motive behind the action. A crucial question is why do we trust people more who cooperate without calculating the costs? We propose a game theory model to explain this phenomenon. One player has the option to “look” at the costs of cooperation, and the other player chooses whether to continue the interaction. If it is occasionally very costly for player 1 to cooperate, but defection is harmful for player 2, then cooperation without looking is a subgame perfect equilibrium. This behavior also emerges in population-based processes of learning or evolution. Our theory illuminates a number of key phenomena of human interactions: authentic altruism, why people cooperate intuitively, one-shot cooperation, why friends do not keep track of favors, why we admire principled people, Kant’s second formulation of the Categorical Imperative, taboos, and love.

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Sea Slug has Taken Genes from the Algae it Eats, Allowing it to Photosynthesize Like a Plant

Sea Slug has Taken Genes from the Algae it Eats, Allowing it to Photosynthesize Like a Plant | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

How a brilliant-green sea slug manages to live for months at a time “feeding” on sunlight, like a plant, is clarified in a recent study published in The Biological Bulletin. The authors present the first direct evidence that the emerald green sea slug’s chromosomes have some genes that come from the algae it eats. These genes help sustain photosynthetic processes inside the slug that provide it with all the food it needs. Importantly, this is one of the only known examples of functional gene transfer from one multicellular species to another, which is the goal of gene therapy to correct genetically based diseases in humans.


“Is a sea slug a good [biological model] for a human therapy? Probably not. But figuring out the mechanism of this naturally occurring gene transfer could be extremely instructive for future medical applications,” says study co-author Sidney K. Pierce, an emeritus professor at University of South Florida and at University of Maryland, College Park.


The team used an advanced imaging technique to confirm that a gene from the alga V. litorea is present on the E. chlorotica slug’s chromosome. This gene makes an enzyme that is critical to the function of photosynthetic “machines” called chloroplasts, which are typically found in plants and algae.


It has been known since the 1970s that E. chloritica “steals” chloroplasts from V. litorea (called “kleptoplasty”) and embeds them into its own digestive cells. Once inside the slug cells, the chloroplasts continue to photosynthesize for up to nine months—much longer than they would perform in the alga. The photosynthesis process produces carbohydrates and lipids, which nourish the slug.


How the slug manages to maintain these photosynthesizing organelles for so long has been the topic of intensive study and a good deal of controversy. “This paper confirms that one of several algal genes needed to repair damage to chloroplasts, and keep them functioning, is present on the slug chromosome,” Pierce says. “The gene is incorporated into the slug chromosome and transmitted to the next generation of slugs.” While the next generation must take up chloroplasts anew from algae, the genes to maintain the chloroplasts are already present in the slug genome, Pierce says.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Richard Spencer's curator insight, February 5, 6:00 AM

The  wonders  of  evolution  

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Papers
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Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing

The germline, which produces sperm or oocyte, is separated from other cells that generate the rest of the body, the soma, during early development in most animals. Somatic cells experience and respond to the environment in each generation, and it is unknown whether they can transmit information to the germline for inheritance into subsequent generations. We found that neurons of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans can transmit double-stranded RNA to the germline to initiate transgenerational silencing of a gene of matching sequence. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time that a somatic tissue of an animal can have transgenerational effects on a gene through the transport of double-stranded RNA to the germline.


Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing
Sindhuja Devanapally, Snusha Ravikumar, and Antony M. Jose

PNAS

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423333112


Via Complexity Digest
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Complexity Digest's curator insight, February 4, 2:14 PM

This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.

Vasileios Basios's curator insight, February 5, 7:52 AM
Complexity Digest's insight: This could be considered as evidence of Lamarckian inheritance, which in some circles is still considered taboo. The question now is how common this occurs and how relevant it is for evolution.
Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Papers
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Bacterial Stigmergy: An Organising Principle of Multicellular Collective Behaviours of Bacteria

The self-organisation of collective behaviours often manifests as dramatic patterns of emergent large-scale order. This is true for relatively “simple” entities such as microbial communities and robot “swarms,” through to more complex self-organised systems such as those displayed by social insects, migrating herds, and many human activities. The principle of stigmergy describes those self-organised phenomena that emerge as a consequence of indirect communication between individuals of the group through the generation of persistent cues in the environment. Interestingly, despite numerous examples of multicellular behaviours of bacteria, the principle of stigmergy has yet to become an accepted theoretical framework that describes how bacterial collectives self-organise. Here we review some examples of multicellular bacterial behaviours in the context of stigmergy with the aim of bringing this powerful and elegant self-organisation principle to the attention of the microbial research community.

 

Bacterial Stigmergy: An Organising Principle of Multicellular Collective Behaviours of Bacteria
Erin S. Gloag, Lynne Turnbull, and Cynthia B. Whitchurch

Scientifica
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 387342, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/387342


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How Network Science Is Changing Our Understanding of Law

How Network Science Is Changing Our Understanding of Law | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it
One of the more fascinating areas of science that has emerged in recent years is the study of networks and their application to everyday life. It turns out that many important properties of our world are governed by networks with very specific properties.

These networks are not random by any means. Instead, they are often connected in the now famous small world pattern in which any part of the network can be reached in a relatively small number of steps. These kinds of networks lie behind many natural phenomena such as earthquakes, epidemics and forest fires and are equally ubiquitous in social phenomena such as the spread of fashions, languages, and even wars.

So it should come as no surprise that the same kind of network should exist in the legal world. Today, Marios Koniaris and pals at the National Technical University of Athens in Greece show that the network of links between laws follows exactly the same pattern. They say their network approach provides a unique insight into the nature of the law, the way it has emerged and how changes may influence it in the future.

The work of Koniaris and co focuses entirely on the law associated with the European Union. They begin by pointing out that this legal network is different from many other types of networks in two important ways.

Via Ashish Umre
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Ashish Umre's curator insight, January 30, 5:22 PM

Ref:  arxiv.org/abs/1501.05237 : Network Analysis In The Legal Domain: A Complex Model For European Union Legal Sources