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Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Flow, Conflux | Smart Cities

Flow, Conflux | Smart Cities | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

“The city is not only a community, it is a conflux. ….The real city, as a center of industry, is a conflux of streams of traffic; as a center of culture, it is conflux of streams of thought.” So wrote Benton MacKaye in 1928 in his book The New Exploration: A Philosophy of Regional Planning. When I sent a copy of my own recent book The New Science of Cities to my erstwhile colleague and old friend Lionel March, he quickly scowered it and said: “I see in your Preamble that you cite Castells’ ‘space of flows’ and that your approach makes much of flows and networks. I immediately turned to your bibliography to search for the name Benton MacKaye. It is not there! The author of The New Exploration (1928) is my hero of metropolitan/regional development. I’m sure you know of him”.


Via Bernard Ryefield
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 17, 12:00 PM

Location, location, location.

 

The natural geography has to fit with the demands of the population and the society.  It's not something that someone on high chooses, but rather one where things grow up naturally according to the relative advantages and disadvantages of the area.  Then you build and with building in these geographically advantageous (or, sometimes, just convenient) areas you reinforce their advantages as centers of commerce, trade and "flows" as Batty would put it.

 

It makes sense to have it be on the regional, national and/or international scale, such that we, as humans, take advantage of the most strategic places and the most strategic resources that are available.  With this comes the flourishing of new life, happiness and possible/hopefully sustainable prosperity for the present and for the future well being of our civilizations.

 

The climate is changing and that's going to force a lot of changes on our part.  If we can survive the environmental tumult, and the economic and social tumult that it is going to cause, we could potentially, get off on a better footing than before, in spite of the losses which we incur as a result of the present silliness of our political, social and economic "leadership".

 

Good stuff!

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Future of Work
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Networked for complexity

Networked for complexity | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

In the 21st century, then, the industrial era has given way to the social era, and it is time to rethink both how we work and how we organise ourselves to do so. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 25, 2013 5:39 PM

Terrific blog post by Richard Martin. You should follow Richard on Scoop.it [url=/u/2565370 x-already-notified=1]Richard Martin[/url] and on Twitter here

Stephen Dale's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:01 AM

I picked out this abstract which resonated with me..." a company is like ‘a social network of productive relationships in which stakeholders are deployed where they are of greatest use. It is designed as a flow of input that can come from anywhere in the network. The work is asynchronous in time and place, and people contribute whatever expertise they have, irrespective of rank or experience." 


Great post.

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Complex systems and projects
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From Cascading Complexity To Systemic Collapse: A Walk Thru "Society's Equivalent Of A Heart Attack"

From Cascading Complexity To Systemic Collapse: A Walk Thru "Society's Equivalent Of A Heart Attack" | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

To make the systems we depend upon more resilient ideally we would want more redundancy within critical systems and weaker coupling between them. Localization and de-complexification of basic needs (food, water, waste etc) would provide some societal resilience if systems resilience was lost. We would have more buffering at all levels, that is, larger inventories throughout society.

All this is the very opposite of the direction of economic forces.

 

 


Via Philippe Vallat
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:55 AM

How vulnerable is our society?

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Common scaling laws for city highway systems and the mammalian neocortex - Changizi - 2009 - Complexity - Wiley Online Library

Common scaling laws for city highway systems and the mammalian neocortex - Changizi - 2009 - Complexity - Wiley Online Library | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

Changizi, M. A. and Destefano, M. (2010), Common scaling laws for city highway systems and the mammalian neocortex. Complexity, 15: 11–18. doi: 10.1002/cplx.20288


Via Bernard Ryefield
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 19, 4:01 PM

Could you imagine if we're able to mimic our social/constructed systems upon our natural/organic systems?  Imagine if we could discover the natural laws that shape our world and then make our world be in conformity with these natural, discovered laws (as opposed to our abstracted, imaginatively created laws.

 

Think about it!

Rescooped by Vasileios Basios from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Wicked Problems

Wicked Problems | collectibles from scoop.it | Scoop.it

A wicked problem is one for which each attempt to create a solution changes the understanding of the problem. Wicked problems cannot be solved in a traditional linear fashion, because the problem definition evolves as new possible solutions are considered and/or implemented. The term was originally coined by Horst Rittel.

 

Wicked problems always occur in a social context -- the wickedness of the problem reflects the diversity among the stakeholders in the problem.


Most projects in organizations -- and virtually all technology-related projects these days -- are about wicked problems. Indeed, it is the social complexity of these problems, not their technical complexity, that overwhelms most current problem solving and project management approaches

 

 


Via Bernard Ryefield
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