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The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning

The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning | collaborative learning | Scoop.it

“Projects” can represent a range of tasks that can be done at home or in the classroom, by parents or groups of students, quickly or over time.

While project-based learning (PBL) also features projects, in PBL the focus is more on the process of learning and learner-peer-content interaction that the end-product itself.

The learning process is also personalized in a progressive PBL environment by students asking important questions, and making changes to products and ideas based on individual and collective response to those questions. In PBL, the projects only serve as an infrastructure to allow users to play, experiment, use simulations, address authentic issues, and work with relevant peers and community members in pursuit of knowledge.


Via Karen Bonanno, JennaMRyan
nicole esterow's insight:

Projects are a range of different tasks that can be completed either at home or in the classroom by partners or groups of students usually over a period of time. Project based learning includes projects but is more focused on the the process of learning and working with peers than the content of the project. The article presents a table that describes all the differences and how project based learning can be beneficial. 

 

I think that learning through doing is an important thing for students. But projects are not always the answer. Many time group projects end up being one person doing the work and everyone's name being attached to it. It's important to create projects that create a projec-based learning envrionment. I think that having project-based learning in a classroom is great. I also hope that most teachers understand the difference and try to assign more projectbased learning activities. 

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:02 PM

This article describes the difference between projects and project-based learning.  Though some aspects of the two types of classroom learning are similar, project based learning generally takes projects to the next level.  PBL is a student centered approach to instruction and as such, asking students important questions and making changes to products and ideas created the philosophy behind PBL.  This resource includes an extensive chart that compares projects with PBL.  Here are three I'd like to highlight:

1. Projects can be done at home with out teacher guidance or team collaboration, where as PBL requires teacher guidance and team collaboration.

2. Projects do not give students many opportunities to make choices at any point in the project, while PBL requires the students to make most of the choices during the project with pre-approved guidelines.

3. Projects are generally turned and are all the same while PBL opportunities are presented to a public audience encompassing people from outside the classroom and they are different.

 

My reaction to this article surprised even me.  I was interested to learn about the differences between PBL and Projects.  Before curating the various articles for PBL and reading about it, I assumed that PBL basically meant the kids do projects to learn in the classroom.  After reading this article, I see that by thinking this way I was overlooking some significant aspects and benefits of PBL.  PBL takes doing projects to the next level because the projects are relevant to the kids' lives and they are child-centered.  Because PBL allows children to choose their topic and where their project is going with teacher approval, they experience ownership and they can get passionate about their work rather than doing projects.  I did a project in high school that was the same assignment for everyone and I had to work with what the teacher gave us for the problem.  I feel like I would have been so much more enthusiastic and engaged in the assignment if I was allowed to choose a topic that interested me and I could take it in a new direction.  I hope by using PBL principles in my classroom and allowing an open-ended aspect in each project the children work on, they will feel a sense of accomplishment and pride when they are finished.

 

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Collaborative Learning Homepage

Collaborative Learning Homepage | collaborative learning | Scoop.it
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This site is the main site for the collaborative learning movement. It talks about the three main goals of the movemnet.

1) To develop resoruces that empower and encourage students to work with oter students in the class.

2) To make ocmplex and abstract ideas accessible by presenting them in a concrete, visual and tactile way. 

3) To incraese and encourage exploratory talk. The site has a breif history of the movement, a newsletter and even gives lesson plan ideas in over 30 topics. 

 

I think this wensite is a great resource. It is a place to look up information on why collaborative learning is important and can help explain to parents and administrators why you use it in your classroom. The lesson plans are also a great tool to use in the classroom. I think that understanding that there is a big movement to include collabortive learning will encourage teachers to incorporate it more into their lesson plans. 

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5 apps to unite your district and encourage collaborative learning

5 apps to unite your district and encourage collaborative learning | collaborative learning | Scoop.it
When you think of the term
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This article talks about 5 apps that help encourage collaborative learning. The fist app it recommends is Popplet. This app is similar to pinterest. Having a space where students can share their thoughts, projects artwork and more can be great. The next ting it suggests is twitter. It is a great eay to stay connected and learn from other students. Voicethread is a great way to keep students engaged. It allows teacher and students to collaborate from where eer they can use their phones. The article suggests doing a QR Code scavenger hunt. It gives a link to a site that creates QR codes and suggests making a bunch that link to different pages that connect to what students are learning in class. The last is Edmodo. It describes it as the secure facebook of the education world. It is a way to post assignments and discussions, similar to elms.

 

I thought this article was great. I think that apps and technology are a great way to foster collabortive learning. Like I discussed in one of my other posts, on of my high school teachers used twitter in the way the article describes. It was extremely helpful and a great way to collaborate with other people in my class. I thought the suggestion of Edmodo was interesting. The school I worked with this semester used Edmodo. My cooperating teacher would post the homework each day and the parents had access to it. She said it was a very helpful tool and she enjoyed using it. 

 

 

I wanted to include this article because it connects to my other newspaper "technology in the classroom." I think it is important to realize that technology can help in all aspects of the classroom; collaborative learning is one of them. 

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Remake Your Class Part 3: Exploring a Collaborative Learning Environment

Visit http://www.edutopia.org/remake for more tips and resources! Edutopia's three-part series follows a determined teacher at Roosevelt Middle School in San...
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I thought this video was really interesting. The video was a description of how a classroom was changed and why. The first thing that was changed was that all of the tables were pushed together to foster group work. This created a better "flow" within the calssroom which the speakers states is one of the most important parts to collaboration and group work. The teaching station was completely changed. It allows the teacher to feel like he is more a part of rest of the room. This is important because collaborative learning can include teachers, not just students. Making the calss interactive is also part of collaborative learning. The students noticed that it looked more organized because the setup makes more sense. 

 

This video was so interesting. I got a lot of great ideas from it for my future calssroom. It talked about how the classroom setup can be a huge component to fostering collobarative learning. I also LOVED that there was a white board on the back wall that was created for students to teach each other. I am a big believer that the best way to understand a topic is to teach it to a peer. 

 

This also talked about having technology in the classroom. This connects to my other newspaper. The video discussed how technology can help students work together. 

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The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning

The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning | collaborative learning | Scoop.it

“Projects” can represent a range of tasks that can be done at home or in the classroom, by parents or groups of students, quickly or over time.

While project-based learning (PBL) also features projects, in PBL the focus is more on the process of learning and learner-peer-content interaction that the end-product itself.

The learning process is also personalized in a progressive PBL environment by students asking important questions, and making changes to products and ideas based on individual and collective response to those questions. In PBL, the projects only serve as an infrastructure to allow users to play, experiment, use simulations, address authentic issues, and work with relevant peers and community members in pursuit of knowledge.


Via Karen Bonanno, JennaMRyan
nicole esterow's insight:

Projects are a range of different tasks that can be completed either at home or in the classroom by partners or groups of students usually over a period of time. Project based learning includes projects but is more focused on the the process of learning and working with peers than the content of the project. The article presents a table that describes all the differences and how project based learning can be beneficial. 

 

I think that learning through doing is an important thing for students. But projects are not always the answer. Many time group projects end up being one person doing the work and everyone's name being attached to it. It's important to create projects that create a projec-based learning envrionment. I think that having project-based learning in a classroom is great. I also hope that most teachers understand the difference and try to assign more projectbased learning activities. 

more...
JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:02 PM

This article describes the difference between projects and project-based learning.  Though some aspects of the two types of classroom learning are similar, project based learning generally takes projects to the next level.  PBL is a student centered approach to instruction and as such, asking students important questions and making changes to products and ideas created the philosophy behind PBL.  This resource includes an extensive chart that compares projects with PBL.  Here are three I'd like to highlight:

1. Projects can be done at home with out teacher guidance or team collaboration, where as PBL requires teacher guidance and team collaboration.

2. Projects do not give students many opportunities to make choices at any point in the project, while PBL requires the students to make most of the choices during the project with pre-approved guidelines.

3. Projects are generally turned and are all the same while PBL opportunities are presented to a public audience encompassing people from outside the classroom and they are different.

 

My reaction to this article surprised even me.  I was interested to learn about the differences between PBL and Projects.  Before curating the various articles for PBL and reading about it, I assumed that PBL basically meant the kids do projects to learn in the classroom.  After reading this article, I see that by thinking this way I was overlooking some significant aspects and benefits of PBL.  PBL takes doing projects to the next level because the projects are relevant to the kids' lives and they are child-centered.  Because PBL allows children to choose their topic and where their project is going with teacher approval, they experience ownership and they can get passionate about their work rather than doing projects.  I did a project in high school that was the same assignment for everyone and I had to work with what the teacher gave us for the problem.  I feel like I would have been so much more enthusiastic and engaged in the assignment if I was allowed to choose a topic that interested me and I could take it in a new direction.  I hope by using PBL principles in my classroom and allowing an open-ended aspect in each project the children work on, they will feel a sense of accomplishment and pride when they are finished.

 

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5 Tips to Make Your Collaborative Learning Plans Effective

5 Tips to Make Your Collaborative Learning Plans Effective | collaborative learning | Scoop.it
As psychologists and behavioral experts discover more about the various learning modalities and
nicole esterow's insight:

This article is about how to make lesson plans effective. The first tip is to setup the classroom in a smart way. Similarly to the video below it talks about how desks should be setup in clusters in order to foster group work. The next tip is to use process-oriented learning. This is an assignment where the "right" answers don't exist. This willl help students learn to work in groups and stregnthen their interpersonal skills. It is important to teach students that everyone is accountable. Like I discussed in an earlier post, many group projects end in one person doing most of the work. A few ways to make students accountable are to give group tests, circulate around the room and watch what is going on and allow the group to grade the other memebers. Another thing the article suggests, which I also talked about earlier, is peer teaching. Allowing students to teach each other in a group setting is the best way for students to grasp the knowledge. The last thing the article talks about is group selection. The teacher should control the groups. In order for collaborative learning to be effective, there needs to be a balance of skill levels. 

 

I thought this article was good. It restated a lot of things I had thought into a formal article. These tips are useful for teachers of any age. Most curriculums include group projects. While many students and teachers don't look forward to them, I think these tips will help. As a teacher, using these to prepare will make it an enjoyable and educational experience. 

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Teamie

Teamie | collaborative learning | Scoop.it
The Collaborative Learning Network
nicole esterow's insight:

Teamie is a website similar to canvas. It is a way for teachers to post assignments, quizzes, grades, announcements and anyhting else they can think of. Students can ask questions, rate how easy or hard an assignment was or start a discussion on a topic. On teamie, parents also have access to their child's pages. It is a great way for students to talk to each other and create a collaborative learning environment.

 

I think teamie is a great tool. I made an account and played around on it for a while. On the main page after you log in there is a sidebar with all sorts of options. You can share a thought, ask a question, set a poll and much more. Teamie doesn't limit your social network to only the people in your class. 

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Collaborative Learning.mp4

The video clip describe the concept of Collaborative learning in a given class setup. Collaborative learning is based on Vygotsky model of learning in which ...
nicole esterow's insight:

This video talks about what collabortive learning is. It involves face-to-face promotive interation, interpersonal skills, individual accountability and group processing. By working in groups, the students are able to help one another. technology helps students collaborate outside the calssroom. Students learn faster, understand better and are better at applying knowledge. 

 

While I think collaborative learnign is great, it doesnt always work as well as the video makes it seem. The students in my calssroom sit at tables, not individual desks. Most of the time when they work together it's great. Sometimes the students end up talking and getting off topic. It can lead to less productivity than indivual work somtimes. 

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