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People In Close-Knit Neighborhoods Feel More Positive

People In Close-Knit Neighborhoods Feel More Positive | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood can take a toll on mental health. However, feeling a close connection to neighbors may offset some of those negative effects, a new study finds.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

#Cardiff study emphasises benefits of community to #mentalhealth.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 2, 2014 2:09 AM

Interesting study from Cardiff University.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, February 2, 2014 2:23 AM

Remember when we knew our neighbors?

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Emergent Culture

Emergent Culture | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’m using a series of pieces to explore aspects of the Socially Dynamic Organisation and, today, my thoughts have turned to culture and community. I often describe ‘community’ according to two principles: shared purpose and shared values. Shared purpose can be imposed, whilst shared values must emerge from within the system itself. You cannot impose shared values, only create the conditions for them to emerge. Dependent upon the co-existence (or otherwise) of these two factors, a community can be either ‘coherent’ or ‘incoherent’, e.g. if it has shared purpose and values, it is ‘coherent’. If It has been given shared purpose, but lacks shared values, it may still function on one level, but be ‘incoherent’ in culture e.g. not bonded by trust and values.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughts on coherence and community, via @julianstodd.

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When is a crowd wise? | Nesta

When is a crowd wise? | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Making the right connections can create huge value. The world is full of problems in need of solutions, and solutions in need of problems. The designers of new platforms want to make the world a smarter and better place, and also quite like the idea of being the ‘go to’ platform for innovation.

But how close is anyone to delivering on their promise? At Nesta we have used quite a few of these platforms. We’ve supported some (like Leading Edge Only which links big corporates with inventors), and our challenges.org site provides a comprehensive tool that’s grown out of the challenge prize team's work.

All the examples listed above are impressive in their own ways, and I don’t doubt that before long some very powerful tools for matching solutions and problems, innovators and organisations wanting answers, will emerge. But I've ended up fairly sceptical about many of the ones I see. The platform aspect often turns out to be useful - but not nearly as decisive as many predicted a few years ago, mainly because the matching process is far more subtle than today’s platform technologies can handle. Instead it’s the combination of the online and offline processes that often turns out to be most important, but is missing from most of the proposals I see.
David Hain's insight:

Nest's Geoff Mulgan on the way to make better connections. Great read!

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There Is No ‘I’ in Team When It Comes to Emotional Intelligence

There Is No ‘I’ in Team When It Comes to Emotional Intelligence | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We know that tasks are accomplished through collaborations between people and tools rather than single individuals, yet we still tend to default to the individual’s perspective when determining needs, designing interventions and evaluating results. What would it mean to look at learning and performance from a team rather than an individual perspective?

To answer this question, consider two ways of thinking about cognition at the team level. Collective cognition directly reflects the sum of its parts. It’s an aggregate of the individuals’ properties within the team. Holistic cognition, in contrast, is something other than an aggregate of individual capabilities. Through team processes such as communication, decision-making and collaboration, there is a set of knowledge, skills and attitudes that emerge only at the team level; it is non-existent within individuals.

This is particularly important in complex settings that require sophisticated awareness of the environment and mental models. Disastrous outcomes in this kind of scenario have played out many times over. Historically, gaps at the team level, rather than individual capabilities, have contributed to epic catastrophes, from the Challenger and Columbia space shuttle explosions to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear meltdowns.
David Hain's insight:

Developing collective emotional intelligence needed for effective collaboration!

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Cooperation emerges when groups are small and memories are long, study finds

Cooperation emerges when groups are small and memories are long, study finds | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The tragedy of the commons, a concept described by ecologist Garrett Hardin, paints a grim view of human nature. The theory goes that, if a resource is shared, individuals will act in their own self-interest, but against the interest of the group, by depleting that resource.
Yet examples of cooperation and sharing abound in nature, from human societies down to single-celled bacteria.
In a new paper, published in the journal Scientific Reports, University of Pennsylvania researchers use game theory to demonstrate the complex set of traits that can promote the evolution of cooperation. Their analysis showed that smaller groups in which actors had longer memories of their fellow group members' actions were more likely to evolve cooperative strategies.
The work suggests one possible advantage of the human's powerful memory capacity: it has fed our ability as a society to cooperate.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article on how we can cooperate to avoid the tragedy of the commons!

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Claude Emond's comment, June 28, 8:49 AM
Great find David. Going to scoop it all over the place. Cheers from Montreal
Claude Emond's curator insight, June 28, 8:56 AM

Great findings. Let's remember what others mean to us and set our organizations to encourage self-organized small cells (holarchies) acting and collaborating together to make the ultimate difference and create lasting value for everybody

Claude Emond's curator insight, June 28, 8:57 AM

Great findings. Let's remember what others mean to us and set our organizations to encourage self-organized small cells (holarchies) acting and collaborating together to make the ultimate difference and create lasting value for everybody

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Don’t Ask To Pick My Brain. — ReadThink 

Don’t Ask To Pick My Brain. — ReadThink  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
And 11 other tips for building a strong professional network.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughts on how to best build personal networks!

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Creating the Socially Dynamic Organisation

Creating the Socially Dynamic Organisation | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I don’t think it’s too much to ask: indeed, i think that those organisations who ignore the pressures of the ecosystem of the Social Age, are threatened with extinction. And rightly so: the Victorian architecture of control that surround many people within organisations today is no longer fit for purpose. The Future Org must be adapted, the future of work, different.
David Hain's insight:

Thinking future orgs out loud with @JulianStodd. Really helpful framing for what collaboration implies...

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Christian Felber and the Economy for the Common Good 

Christian Felber and the Economy for the Common Good  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Christian Felber is not just an activist, but a scholar and an entrepreneur. He’s a lecturer at the Vienna University of Economics and Business and author of several bestsellers including: “50 Suggestions for a Fairer World”, “New Values for the Economy”, “Let’s save the Euro!”, “Change Everything: Creating an economy for the common good” and “Money. The new rules of the game”. He initiated the movement of the “Economy for the Common Good” and the project “Bank for the Common Good” (ECG).

He did his homework. What is the common good? Looking into constitutions everywhere – he studied what people thought was fair and just. There are commonalities of what a good, purposeful life and a just society entail. Felber co-founded Attac Austria, a group of 12 Austrian entrepreneurs who started to apply these constitutional principles in business, trying to create a new model that transcended the old polarity of communism and capitalism. The Economy for the Common Good (ECG) movement was born. Today about 1750 companies, primarily from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, have declared their support to ECG and are serving the common good while trying to improve the
David Hain's insight:

A reminder that the ultimate role of the economy is to serve the common good!

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Extreme Collaboration

Extreme Collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We have complex problems in the world today. We will solve them better TOGETHER. Technology has brought us an interconnectedness that brings an enormous opportunity for collaboration. My wish is that we not only embrace collaboration, but bump it up a level to “extreme collaboration”. Where we don’t just accept collaboration as necessary, but we actively seek it out. Where we don’t just need to get what we want, but we want to get what we both want. Where we don’t just share what information/knowledge is necessary, but we share everything because we realize that the more we see, the more we can appreciate, the more we can learn, and the more ideas we can generate together. I know many who tell me that I’m not realistic, that it will never work, and it’s just a pipe dream - but I will suggest that the most extraordinary changes are going to come when we create possibilities that aren’t realistic, that no one thinks can ever be done, or that it’s just a crazy dream.
David Hain's insight:

Passionate advocacy for a growth mindset, and the potential for collaboration to realise abundance?

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A New Growth Theory — Work Futures

A New Growth Theory — Work Futures | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
But two aspects of work have changed dramatically.
The most successful firms are themselves multi-sided markets in interaction with entities “outside”, enabling interaction between customers and network partners. These firms are the new market platforms. It is now more expensive to internalize than to link and network.
Second, the products/services the platform firm sells to its clients are not offerings of the firm per se, but offerings created by specific network players in specific situations of “local” network interaction. Scale and scope are combined.
The new task is to understand network phenomena.
David Hain's insight:

In the connected world we need to understand networks much better. Here's some progressive thinking on that issue!

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What is a PLN? Why do I need one?

What is a PLN? Why do I need one? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“ In the education world, PLN stands for Personal Learning Network. What it means is that an individual has developed their own personalized “network” of fellow educators and resources who are designed to make them a better teacher. This network exists both in their real-life relationships and online through their social media connections. With more and more opportunities to develop one’s skills beyond what traditional routes have provided, establishing your own PLN is an essential step toward deepening your abilities as an educator. In the past, teachers were able to get connected to teaching resources through master’s courses, education journals, conferences, professional development, and other similar activities. Each of these were and still are excellent ways to broaden your knowledge and skills in education. However, because each of these requires your physical presence and procurement of physical materials, they also come with certain restrictions.”
Via Edumorfosis, Elena Elliniadou, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
David Hain's insight:
Why we all need to work on our personal learning network!
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Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, June 9, 7:10 PM
Por qué es útil identificar y gestionar la red personal de aprendizaje. PLN (Personal Learning Network).
Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 12, 8:59 AM
Everyone spends time on the Internet. Why not use some of your time for the purpose of self improvement in a manner that you choose and design?
Roger Francis's curator insight, June 13, 6:55 AM
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Leadership and Imagination: A really cool story, resources, and tools

Leadership and Imagination: A really cool story, resources, and tools | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Leadership and Imagination: A really cool story, resources, and tools #people https://t.co/ijI6PBhrPK
Via F. Thunus
David Hain's insight:

The Purple Line- as story about the power of community collaboration!

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An Architecture for Learning Technology

An Architecture for Learning Technology | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’ve written before that the Social Age is about an involved sociology, not simply new technology, but technology is a key part of it. For many organisations it’s the first place they turn, trying to procure a technology solution for what is essentially a social problem. Technology is not the answer, but it may facilitate the answer, and to let it do that I’m sharing the first draft of an architecture for learning technology, intended to help organisations choose not a single system, but rather to create a diverse ecosystem of technology in service of people.
David Hain's insight:

Get the technology right, and the networking economy is undoubtedly easier. Some insightful thoughts form @JulianStodd!

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Making Performance Work (BetaCodex10)

The future of performance systems.
BetaCodex Network white paper on "performance management" basics.
This paper was revised in 2012 and again in 2013
David Hain's insight:

Outstanding presentation form Nils Pflaeging on the future of work - must read!

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a note to business ‘leaders’

a note to business ‘leaders’ | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Would you still be a leader if you lost your positional authority? How would you know? In networks, your authority is derived from your reputation and the value of your connections to others in the network. Value and authority come from engagement with a network, usually over a long period of time. It’s the sum of many small interactions. So what would happen if you suddenly lost your positional authority?
David Hain's insight:

Authority and power have different frames in the social/networked/knowledge economy. Are you applying the appropriate one?

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The Socially Dynamic Organisation: Connected, Adapted, Fluid

The Socially Dynamic Organisation: Connected, Adapted, Fluid | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Within the Dynamic Change Framework we explore three manifestations of change within an organisation: the Resistant organisation, which denies any permission to change, the Constrained organisation, which wants to change but is fundamentally unable to relinquish the control to do so, and the Dynamic organisation, which is fully adapted to thrive in the Social Age. I started using a language around the Dynamic organisation to indicate the conditions behind its success: I’ve started calling it the Socially Dynamic organisation.
David Hain's insight:

'Community will form whether we desire it or not. In the socially dynamic organisation we have permission to be a part of it' ~ insightful stuff from @JulianStodd!

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Five Secrets to Enabling Highly Collaborative Ecosystems 

Five Secrets to Enabling Highly Collaborative Ecosystems  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Companies today need consistency, reliability, commitment and capability to react quickly in a system of greater connectedness, volatility and competition, while simultaneously looking for more sustainability, resilience and greater permanence. 

Luckily, today, we not only have the wherewithal to envision business ecosystems, but also the technical and operational capabilities to blue-print, develop and enable their emergence. However, if not well-conceived, companies involved in making them a reality, particularly firms in the ‘center’ of the ecosystem may not access the benefits that a truly well designed ecosystem can bring. 

At the end of the day, the devil is not only in the structural details, but also in the fundamental social contracts between the partners who participate in the ecosystem and choose to contribute collaboratively to its emergence. 

These tried and true secrets, stemming from my recent book ‘Enabling Collaboration’ will help to build the kind of ecosystem that can self-correct and self-sustain in times of market change and dynamism that supports all actors’ success. 
David Hain's insight:

Building collaboration ecosystems- some very useful tips!

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Sanket Shah's curator insight, May 27, 7:43 AM
Today's need is consistency, reliability, commitment and capability to compete in market. Building ecosystem allows to achieve all these results. The devils like structural details and social contracts between the employees are not allow to build healthy ecosystem. But the answer is here;-
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The Limits of Hierarchy: Brittle Systems

The Limits of Hierarchy: Brittle Systems | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Systems can fail as a result of the complex interplay of frames, scripts, and power

The challenge with Black Swan type events is that the inputs are not simply unknown, they have unrecognisable even when visible. Almost by definition the context will be misunderstood and the wrong frame applied.

To build resilience into the system, we cannot hope to avoid the miss framing, instead we need to building the ambiguity, permission, narrative frameworks and controls to allow the subsequent reframing to occur.

David Hain's insight:

Fascinating tips form @JulianStodd on how to frame events - critical to VUCA problem solving and genuinely adaptive solutions.

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50+ things you think if you have an old workplace learning mindset

50+ things you think if you have an old workplace learning mindset | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The difference between those organisations who are really moving ahead in the new world of workplace learning and doing things differently and those who are just tinkering with the traditional workplace training model is a new mindset.

Here are 50+ things you think if you have an old workplace learning mindset compiled my colleagues in the Internet Time Alliance – and embedded in the post below.
David Hain's insight:

How's your learning mindset? New, or like the one the article?

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“We made up these rules, and we can change them”

“We made up these rules, and we can change them” | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Now is the time for a serious rethinking of how we organize in our society: from businesses, to schools, and as communities. We need to base all of our organizations on the principle of temporary, negotiated hierarchies. In this way, citizens can freely cooperate and from time to time, as required, collaborate to get things done. This requires a new approach to organizing work, abolishing the separation of employer & employee, as well as the artificial and unequal division between labour and financial capital. Simultaneously, our educational systems need to phase out teachers and curriculum and focus on everyone becoming a better learner.

Top down leadership, including teaching, is no longer necessary in the network era. As Donald Clark notes, “We have fetishised ‘Leadership’, we’re all leaders now, rendering the word meaningless”. I have noted before that smart cities need smart citizens. The smart citizen is connected: to communities of practice, extended social networks, the community, and society. In the network era rigid hierarchies are counter-productive, as they shut off opportunities for serendipity and innovation, which is why self-organization must be the basis of new organizational model. The market era is ending. The emerging network era needs new operating principles. Now is the time to create these.
David Hain's insight:

Operating principles for the network era require self-organisation, says @hjarche. As usual, provocative and on the money!

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Breakthrough Leadership – A New Way of Thinking

Breakthrough Leadership – A New Way of Thinking | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “The exceptional life depends not on working harder, but on different, even opposite actions from habit and the crowd.” This quote was shared by neuroscientist Dr. Robert Cooper at the 2016 YPO Pacific EDGE regional conference in Los Angeles. He used data backed by science and technology to challenge business leaders to achieve their true potential.

“Your brain is not your friend. In terms of you becoming your best possible self, it is a terrible boss. It avoids change, it magnifies the negative, it plays small, it nitpicks; it delays and defers everything that matters most,” he said. “It leans away from possibility.”
David Hain's insight:

For better collaboration, encourage constructive discontent.

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 23, 9:31 AM
(From the article): To close, Cooper emphasized that leaders have to make the conscious choice to continue learning and growing. “We are living in a very special moment in history when neuroscience and technology are combining to help us transcend the brain’s limitations and move toward our true potential. This is your time, this is your chance,” he said.
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How Pixar’s 22 Storytelling Rules Apply to Your Business

How Pixar’s 22 Storytelling Rules Apply to Your Business | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Unlike how most people get started writing and creating online, which is typically very lonely, Pixar thrives on collaboration. Employees there aren’
Via F. Thunus
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F. Thunus's curator insight, May 18, 7:52 AM

Story telling doesn't have to be about business :-)

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20 Questions for Business Leaders

20 Questions for Business Leaders | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Whether we’re conscious of it or not, every management decision is motivated by a desire to find universal answers to very specific questions. People who succeed in organizations tend to be pragmatic problem solvers. They have to be, because of the myriad challenges they face. How to grow the enterprise. How to get work done. How to find customers. How to be themselves in the workplace. And so on. Because there are no easy answers to these complex problems, they test the answers by starting a company, launching a project, or making a move. As they succeed and fail, the most attentive of them learn from the results. The history of business is thus the story of entrepreneurs, executives, leaders, and employees, lurching from one experimental answer to another. They gain expertise and acumen, and profits and revenues, and, along the way, add to the theory of management.
David Hain's insight:

There must be some questions here that you should be asking about the complex issues you face! Together, if you are collaborating...

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 20, 7:36 AM
(From the article): Whether we’re conscious of it or not, every management decision is motivated by a desire to find universal answers to very specific questions. People who succeed in organizations tend to be pragmatic problem solvers. They have to be, because of the myriad challenges they face. How to grow the enterprise. How to get work done. How to find customers. How to be themselves in the workplace. And so on. Because there are no easy answers to these complex problems, they test the answers by starting a company, launching a project, or making a move. As they succeed and fail, the most attentive of them learn from the results. The history of business is thus the story of entrepreneurs, executives, leaders, and employees, lurching from one experimental answer to another. They gain expertise and acumen, and profits and revenues, and, along the way, add to the theory of management.
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Fundamentals of mapping experiences

Fundamentals of mapping experiences | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Learn the basics—touchpoints, moments of truth, and jobs to be done—and study examples of successful user experiences.

Via Mario K. Sakata, Fred Zimny
David Hain's insight:

Mapping - a practical collaboration tool with a team building twist!

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How Shared Leadership Changes Our Relationships at Work

How Shared Leadership Changes Our Relationships at Work | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Recent research on change management teams, virtual teams and new startup teams has shown that teams in which leadership is shared, rather than vested on a single individual, can be very effective, demonstrating through quantitative methods that shared leadership can, and does, lead to improved organizational performance. And yet organizations remain stubbornly hierarchical. Anyone who has tried to share the burdens and privileges of leadership in their teams has probably noticed that doing so is far from straightforward.

Over the last decade, assisting the leadership development of many senior executives attempting the transition to shared leadership, I have often noticed the same phenomenon. While everyone welcomes the idea, a culture of shared leadership does not easily flourish.
David Hain's insight:

Shared leadership works - IF mind sets are right across the team!

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Joey-David Ovey's curator insight, May 17, 3:03 AM
Interesting stuff here. In hierarchical organisations it's important to start and stick to your guns. For it to succeed, the leadership teams need to sing from the same sheet. That requires regular reflection. 
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gamers, artists, and citizens

gamers, artists, and citizens | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Both the gamer and artist mindsets can help us navigate the network era. We need to probe the system, detect patterns, and create something new. It’s time to prepare for a hustle economy by becoming gamers, artists, and aggressively engaged citizens.
David Hain's insight:

Fail fast, fail often! How well does your learning style suit the knowldege era? Good piece by @hjarche!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.