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RSA Animate - Re-Imagining Work

How can we get people more engaged, more productive, and happier at work? Is technology part of the problem - and could it also be part of the solution?

David Hain's insight:

One of a great series - check it out!

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You Do Not Think Alone

You Do Not Think Alone | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“The Thinker,” Auguste Rodin’s bronze sculpture, has become a visual cliché, a common representation of deep thought — a figure, gazing down, chin on hand, completely alone. This is utterly misleading, according to the authors of “The Knowledge Illusion,” which carries the subtitle: “Why We Never Think Alone.” Steven Sloman, a professor at Brown University, and Philip Fernbach, a professor at the University of Colorado’s Leeds School of Business, argue that our intelligence depends on the people and things that surround us, and to a degree we rarely recognize. Knowledge, they say, is a community effort. Sloman answered questions from Mind Matters editor Gareth Cook. 
David Hain's insight:

It takes a village to help each one of us to think effectively...

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Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project

Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The way it is usually told, the message Everything is Connected to Everything Else is not fun to hear. It is intended to cause repentance and reformation. More often, of course, it causes guilt, fear, and an uncontrollable urge to avoid environmentalists.

What we are rarely told is that solutions are as interconnected as problems. One good environmental action can send out waves of good effects as impressive as the chain of disasters that results from environmental evil.

Take energy efficiency, for example. That doesn’t mean deprivation of creature comforts; it means insulating houses, driving cars with better mileage, and plugging in appliances that deliver the same service for less electricity. Amory Lovins of the Rocky Mountain Institute says we could reduce electricity use in the U.S. by 70% with already-proven and currently-economic efficiency measures. We could cut our $430 billion annual energy bill in half just by being as efficient as Japan and West Germany are.
David Hain's insight:

Forget about the butterfly's wings, there is a positive side to inter-connectedness - if we reframe our view of it!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 30, 7:34 PM
Good reminder of the power of both/and. When it comes to solutions to problems acceptance of both/and is often the key to finding the third alternative
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 11, 1:36 PM
Hannah Arendt contended that action is what transcends the space and time we exist in. Teaching is that way. What happens in this moment can transcend space and time, finding new solutions and creating new problems unexpectedly. If we teach children to be environmentally aware, it is a gift that will find its way into the future.
Sunny Ye's curator insight, July 15, 2:32 AM
The butterfly effect
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Globalisation: Don’t patch it up - shake it up – OECD – Medium

Globalisation: Don’t patch it up - shake it up – OECD – Medium | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Unless governments undertake fundamental changes — both individually and collectively — in the way our economies, societies, and political systems work, all our efforts will merely water the seeds of further crisis. We will see reversed the peace and progress that openness and multilateral cooperation have brought over decades.
The tackling of core concerns is long overdue: rising inequalities of income, wealth and opportunities; the growing disconnect between finance and the real economy; mounting divergence in productivity levels between workers, firms and regions; winner-take-most dynamics in many markets; limited progressivity of our tax systems; corruption and capture of politics and institutions by vested interests; lack of transparency and participation by ordinary citizens in decision-making; the soundness of the education and of the values we transmit to future generations.
David Hain's insight:

OECD on the future of globalisation.

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Tribal values are not democratic

Tribal values are not democratic | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

David Ronfeldt, originator of the TIMN framework (Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks) has written a series of posts on what current political changes mean from this perspective. From a TIMN perspective, the reasons for ‘American exceptionalism’ lie mainly in our approach to the T form. We have welcomed immigrants and found ways to enable people from all backgrounds and orientations to live together. Trumpish tribalism will undermine that basis of American exceptionalism, especially if he and his cohorts claim to be restoring it.

David Hain's insight:

An interesting organisational take on Trump's 'divide and conquer' mindset and approach.

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organizing for the network era

organizing for the network era | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The current organizational tyranny was a response to a linear, print-based world. These organizations are artifacts of a time when information was scarce and hard to share, and when connections with others were difficult to make and required command and control. The network era, with digital electric communications, changes this. Organizations today should be designed more like the internet: small pieces, loosely joined.

Last year I described several of my principles and models for the network era and showed how they related to each other. I would like to put these together in a coherent framework to show how we can design organizations for the network era, instead of ones optimized for markets, institutions, or tribes. The network era needs new structures, not modified versions of obsolete models.
David Hain's insight:

Networks and how to navigate/evolve them, by the excellent Harold Jarche!

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Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview

Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We know our choices shape our world, but we rarely recognise that these choices are themselves shaped by our beliefs about the world. It is becoming increasingly clear that it is not technology, or the economy, or politics that presents us with the biggest challenge in creating a sustainable world, but escaping the trap of our present, mechanistic worldview. To quote Wendell Berry:
We have lived by the assumption that what was good for us would be good for the world. We have been wrong. We must change our lives, so that it will be possible to live by the contrary assumption that what is good for the world will be good for us. And that requires that we make the effort to know the world and learn what is good for it. We must learn to cooperate in its processes and to yield to its limits.
David Hain's insight:

Reframing our mental models about the world is critical to making a sustainable difference!

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Peter C. Newton-Evans's curator insight, June 14, 10:22 AM
The old mechanistic worldview--coupled with deterministic thought--has chained up our capacity to change the world. These chains we must now break, before they break us.
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Collaboration that Generates Results: 5 Articles with Interesting Tips

Collaboration that Generates Results: 5 Articles with Interesting Tips | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In these times of relentless change, forcing even the best of companies to transform and future-proof themselves, the real challenge is: getting people to work together across company divisions and cultures in a way that generates results. Like increasing our agility and adaptability, attracting new customers with better services and products, taking better decisions, and solving problems customers genuinely care about.

Is there an ideal recipe, you might wonder? Is there a one-fits-all solution? Companies, challenges and people are way to diverse for one-fits-all solutions, and thank god for that – for wouldn’t life be boring if our actions and solutions were the same!

But there ARE some smart things you can do to improve the quality of cross-company collaboration and generate measurable results. Of all the interventions tested in the course of many years (and in various business settings), here is my personal top 4:
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration's risk-reward ratio is crucial, some good tips to improve it here!

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Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction

Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
So you better quit trying to make your company "flatter". In complexity, an organization must be federative - not flat. When outside markets rule, then it is the part of the organization that we call the periphery that earns the money. It is the periphery that learns from the market easiest. That can best adapt to and respond to markets - quickly and intelligently. In complexity, the center loses its information monopoly, its competence advantage: it can hardly issue any meaningful commands any more. The coupling between periphery and center must consequently be designed in a way that enables the organization to absorb and process market dynamics. For that, the periphery must steer the center through market-like mechanisms and own the monetary resources. Not the other way around. (But hey, the periphery earns the money anyways, right?)
David Hain's insight:

The case against hierarchies, convincingly made by Nils Pflaeging!

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We don’t need hero leaders, we need cultures of learning and leadership

We don’t need hero leaders, we need cultures of learning and leadership | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“We have relied on hero’s for far too long, perhaps because it’s such an enticing promise.

Somewhere there is someone who will fix everything. Somewhere there is the perfect leader who will lead us out of this mess.

Somewhere, there is someone who is visionary, charismatic and brilliant and we will happily follow him or her.

Somewhere.

Well, it’s time for all the heroes to go home.

It is time for us to give up these hopes and expectations, that only serve to make people dependant and passive.

It is time to face the truth of our situation. We are all in this together.

Let’s figure out how to engage the hearts and minds of everyone, and get on with the work to do it.” — Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze
David Hain's insight:

It takes a village...and communities thrive on everyone taking responsibility...

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 16, 10:45 AM
The author, Ash Buchannan, makes the point that, living in community, we each have the opportunity to rise to the occasion and lead. He referenced Margaret Wheatley's work.

Too often in schools, there is desire amongst teachers to be told what they are to do. No one can lead our students for us, so how do we step up in a community of teaching, learning, and leading? To educate and pedagogy are about leading.
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Breaking the silo mentality

Breaking the silo mentality | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
With the very nature of work rapidly changing and continuously pivoting, business leaders can’t afford to not examine how silos may be limiting both the success of the business and their own impact as a leader.

Patrick Lencioni, author of Silos, Politics and Turf Wars describes how silos – ‘and the turf wars they enable devastate organsiations: They waste resources, kill productivity, push good people out the door and jeopardise the achievement of goals’. To overcome them he highlights the need for strong unified leadership that is prepared to look past the behaviours that result from silos and focus on the contextual issues that are often at the heart of the organisation.

While it can be very easy to assume that the inefficiencies and lack of collaboration in a team or organisation are a result of employees not knowing how to play nicely together, often the behaviours result from a sense of powerlessness to actually do anything about the problems they have identified. Leadership teams who recognise this and seek to create solutions that remove roadblocks, facilitate new ways of working and empower employees will create long-term solutions that are easy to execute and scalable.

David Hain's insight:

Silos need to be broken from executive team example!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 5, 12:47 PM
Teachers experience these silos, as well. How do we spend time with each other, sharing what we do? Margot Anderson proposes three essential things to break through the silos: unify around a common vision, focus teaching around that common vision, and recognize what motivates teachers and students. This would appear to be easy enough in teaching, but I have been told by teachers and principals we do too much of that vision stuff. Embedded cultures are challenging to transform.
johanna krijnsen's curator insight, May 6, 8:05 PM
To overcome silo mentality you need strong unified leadership
 
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Why effective leaders must manage up, down, and sideways 

Why effective leaders must manage up, down, and sideways  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Most of the leadership advice aimed at senior functional managers is how to build, align, energize, and guide a world-class team. This is a challenging task in its own right, but we all know it isn’t the whole story. Leaders, even those in the C-suite, must also extend their influence upward and horizontally.

Organization theory suggests that managing upward and sideways is good for both the company and the individual leader’s career: CEOs need the insights and pushback of trusted executives to help sharpen strategy. And complex modern organizations benefit when people engage with their peers across functional and business-unit boundaries to bring a range of perspectives and drive change and innovation.

David Hain's insight:

To engage in collaborative leadership, always think 360. What goes out - or doesn't - always comes back - or doesn't...!

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Nelly Renard's curator insight, April 29, 5:38 PM
Organization theory suggests that managing upward and sideways is good for both the company and the individual leader’s career: CEOs need the insights and pushback of trusted executives to help sharpen strategy. And complex modern organizations benefit when people engage with their peers across functional and business-unit boundaries to bring a range of perspectives and drive change and innovation.
donhornsby's curator insight, May 1, 9:50 AM
While CEOs rely on functional leaders’ ability to build high-performance teams, much more needs to be done to help these leaders extend their influence upward into the C-suite and horizontally across the organization. Happily, our work suggests that not only business impact but also career success redounds to those CMOs (and, we believe, functional leaders of all stripes) who can increase their span of leadership influence upward and across functions.
 
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How GE is becoming a truly global network 

How GE is becoming a truly global network  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The GE that I work for now is not the same company as the one I joined in 1978, with stand-alone businesses in a holding company. Today, we operate on the premise that our whole is greater than the sum of the parts, and the dynamic networking and exchange of ideas and solutions across GE is a performance differentiator for each business. Close to 70 percent of our business now takes place outside the United States, so this networking exchange needs to reach far and wide.

The problem, of course, is that as businesses grow larger and scale up internationally, more silos start to pop up. It’s not always easy for employees to stay connected and share ideas that drive innovation and add new value, or to view sharing and multiple teaming as a competitive advantage. That has been GE’s challenge: how to connect more than 300,000 people, operating in over 180 countries, in a dynamic and practical way without adding more process and bureaucracy that slows them down. Without a radical shift in everyday working behavior—in employees’ relationships with the company and with one another—silos will remain, and the sort of cross-industry and horizontal collaboration that companies like GE need to foster for growth is not going to happen.
David Hain's insight:

GE's efforts to develop collaborative advantage - makes a nice case study!

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Collaboration with Emotional Intelligence: For Earth and All of Us • Six Seconds

Collaboration with Emotional Intelligence: For Earth and All of Us • Six Seconds | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Collaboration is a way of practicing emotional intelligence
At Six Seconds, we also believe in practice, turning ideas into action in pursuit of noble goals. For that reason, we are also focusing during this quarter on the environment and Collaborating for the Earth. Through our EQ Cafés, we are offering opportunities for team learning and discovering ways to use emotional intelligence to help confront the environmental challenges we all face. To join an EQ Café on Brains for Collaboration/Collaborating for the Earth, please check these local listings and be sure to check back since EQ Cafés will be added throughout the quarter.
How can emotional intelligence, or EQ, help us transform our understanding into positive action? EQ means, very simply, making the best decisions by bringing together your thinking and feeling. It means navigating your emotions, applying consequential thinking, engaging your intrinsic motivation, and exercising optimism. It means giving yourself to the world by increasing empathy and pursuing a noble goal that may extend beyond your lifetime to benefit others. And it means fostering positive relationships, connecting with others to create transformation through collaboration, which is essential for solving big challenges.
David Hain's insight:

Six Seconds work is well worth looking up. Focus this quarter on collaboration!

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We've stopped trusting institutions and started trusting strangers

We've stopped trusting institutions and started trusting strangers | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Something profound is changing our concept of trust, says Rachel Botsman. While we used to place our trust in institutions like governments and banks, today we increasingly rely on others, often strangers, on platforms like Airbnb and Uber and through technologies like the blockchain. This new era of trust could bring with it a more transparent, inclusive and accountable society — if we get it right. Who do you trust?

David Hain's insight:

How you get trust from a bunch of initial strangers lies at the heart of collaboration!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:17 AM
Who do you trust?
 
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The Big Benefits of Unified Business Collaboration - Social Business Spotlight Blog

The Big Benefits of Unified Business Collaboration - Social Business Spotlight Blog | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“The Total Economic Impact™ of IBM Connections,” a commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting in February 2017, on behalf of IBM, provides proof of the cost savings and other benefits that a unified collaboration solution delivers. For the study, Forrester conducted in-depth interviews with four companies from different geographies and industries and ranging in size from 1,200 to more than 50,000 employees.
While the companies all had collaboration as their overarching goal, each had more specific aims for their program. The hotel chain headquartered in Mauritius wanted to improve customer experience and drive brand loyalty through the sharing of knowledge and best practices among employees. The engineering and construction services firm based in Europe wanted to boost employee engagement and mobile productivity for field workers. The US transportation firm sought to unite its distributed workforce on a single platform, while the Southeast Asian logistics firm needed to improve IT efficiency and protect confidential data.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration case studies...

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Internet Access a Necessity in the Talent Economy 

Internet Access a Necessity in the Talent Economy  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Most modern-day jobs require a reliable internet connection, and that need is not expected to subside anytime soon.

When viewed as a sector in 2011, internet-related consumption and expenditure was bigger than agriculture or energy, according to “Internet Matters: The Net’s Sweeping Impact on Growth, Jobs, and Prosperity,” a 2011 report from McKinsey Global Institute. The study goes on to say that internet access creates jobs, finding that it created 2.6 jobs for every one lost.

David Hain's insight:

Is the world you are fishing in for talented people becoming smaller?

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Thriving, resilience and surviving

Thriving, resilience and surviving | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
uncertainty and not knowing, in all of its vulnerability, is a gift — it’s the birthplace of our ability to thrive.

But it’s also the potential birthplace of failure, conflict and destruction. The thing is we don’t know what’s going to happen until we lean in. If we lean in too hard, without safe to fail conditions and it doesn’t work out, surviving might be the best we can manage. Therefore, wisdom is called for when creating space for this kind of work.

In a recent podcast, Parker Palmer suggested this kind of uncertainty and complexity can only be held in community. In well organised groups who come together to create this space for each other to navigate uncertainty. Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze tell a similar story in their book Walk out Walk on. Communities who use storytelling and courageous conversations amongst other practises to navigate uncertainty in a healthy way.

I believe these inspirational change makers are onto something very important, speaking about the critical role of community for wisely working with uncertainty.

David Hain's insight:

The critical role of community in dealing with our VUCA world!

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Leadership Development Has Failed. But There’s a Better Model 

Leadership Development Has Failed. But There’s a Better Model  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We are swamped by leadership advice from countless gurus. In the U.S., we give the leadership development industry more than $24 billion annually. It is the No. 1 category in corporate learning and development spending.

What do we get for all this time and money spent on studying leadership? If the purpose of leadership is to effectuate positive change, the answer is “not much.” According to Deloitte, the return on assets for the U.S. economy has steadily declined since 1965. These days, the mighty stumble daily. In 1958, a company could expect to stay on the S&P 500 list for 61 years. Now the average is just 18 years. Domestic productivity growth averaged only 0.34 percent per year between 2011 and 2015, down 82 percent from the growth experienced between 1990 and 2010.

That’s the business view. Have investments in leadership development resulted in an inspired workforce? Again, the answer is no. The industry that consumes billions of dollars intended to develop leaders has failed the leader, the organization and society. It’s time to boldly say “the emperor has no clothes.” A revolution is forming, presenting you, the learning leader with a big question. Will you lead that revolution, be toppled by it, or just get run over?
David Hain's insight:

Teams that learn together perform better together! Consider team development instead/as well as leadership development programmes!

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Is there still time to save our trust in government?

Is there still time to save our trust in government? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
What are the costs of lost public trust? High trust is associated with co-operative behaviour, while low trust is associated with resistance, even to things that seem to be in the person’s overall best interest. Greater trust reduces transaction costs and, by extension can increase compliance while reducing the need for enforcement. The bottom line is, trust influences the relationship between citizens and government and in turn has an impact on the outcomes of public policy. The weight of evidence shows that low trust entails costs for public policy, and thus, there is a strong argument in favour of building more trust.
We are also seeing the fallout from the systemic toxicity of growing inequality. Trust in government is increasing for some, but for others there is a growing perception of government run by and for “establishment elites.” What can be done? Some of the recommendations covered in the book include actions in the following policy areas:
David Hain's insight:

Low trust is the greatest enemy of collaboration, and the greatest  hurdle to ecumenic progress!

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Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World

Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Here are some Culture Keys to optimize your chances for success while networking across cultures:

1. Recognize
Identify your personal preferences and expectations around the networking process.

2. Open Your Mind
Consider that people may have networking protocols and expectations that differ from your own.

Look for cues that suggest the best way to proceed (or query someone else from that culture — even a quick online search could yield some useful information).

3. Identify Ways to Adjust
Be prepared to be patient or move faster than usual depending on the culture within which you are trying network.

Accept that you may need to nurture connections in ways that might feel out of sync or unrelated to what you are hoping to get out of the relationship.
David Hain's insight:

You can't become a networked citizen of the world without understanding the way things are done in other cultures!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 29, 6:32 PM
This is increasingly important. Teachers teach in classrooms that are multicultural. What does that mean to them?
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How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities

How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

It’s easy to say that different organizations can collaborate to achieve, but if it’s so easy in practice, the world would have solved challenges such as access to clean water by now.

Dr. John Bryson, an expert in collaborative governance and the McKnight Presidential Professor of Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, notes that, “Collaboration is not an easy answer to hard problems; it’s a hard answer to hard problems and there’s no getting around it.”

In a recent paper with colleagues Dr. Fran Ackerman and Dr. Colin Eden in Public Administration Review, he used CCL’s model of Direction-Alignment-Commitment — the shared tasks of leadership — to help explain the results of their study on public-private partnerships (PPPs).

David Hain's insight:

Collaboration is hard - but the process is pretty simple!

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Phyllis L Trower's curator insight, March 22, 2:43 PM
common sense to common practice 
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Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough

Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’ve spent 20 years in Silicon Valley working alongside the tech industry in a variety of capacities. From my experience, effective collaboration is the key ingredient to making innovation happen. And that’s reflected in our survey: Collaboration is already a priority for many CEOs, with 86 percent saying collaboration is a very important skill. That direct link between collaboration and innovation is something also borne out in PwC’s ongoing Innovation Benchmark study, where leaders cite innovative behaviors and culture as integral to success.

Without collaboration and the cross-disciplinary fertilization that it enables, it’s difficult to generate radically new ideas. Without challenges from outside your domain, it’s too easy to get stuck in the same boxes. Without outsiders to test your preconceptions and push you to defend your more outrageous ideas, it’s hard to develop inspiration into true innovation.

David Hain's insight:

All the technology in the world won't guarantee success, without a genuinely collaborative mindset and skills!

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Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics

Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Like a garden, the economy consists of an environment and interdependent elements—sun, soil, seed, water. But far more than a garden, the economy also contains the expectations and interpretations all the agents have about what all the other agents want and expect. And that invisible web of human expectations becomes, in an everamplifying spiral, both cause and effect of external circumstances. Thus the housing-led financial crisis. Complexity scientists describe it in terms of “feedback loops.” Financier George Soros has described it as “reflexivity.” What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is.

Traditional economics holds that the economy is an equilibrium system; that things tend, over time, to even out and return to “normal.” Complexity economics shows that the economy, like a garden, is never in perfect balance or stasis and is always both growing and shrinking. And like an untended garden, an economy left entirely to itself tends toward unhealthy imbalances. This is a very different starting point, and it leads to very different conclusions about what the government should do about the economy.
David Hain's insight:

Think of the ecosystem as a complex web. Become a good gardener! "What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is."

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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A new, practical theory of leadership, organizational power and structure has emerged. It is ending one of the biggest misunderstandings in organizational science: The notion that organizations can be described through a single structure, a structure that has since the glory days of the railway corporation in the middle of the 19th century been usually depicted in the shape of org charts.

While it is clear to most practitioners today that org charts, or connected boxes, cannot even remotely describe organizational complexity and reality, theory and organization development have not advanced much from the original metaphor of organizations as top-down pyramids, lines structures, silos and stand-alone functions. Just a few years back, John P. Kotter started to promote a slightly advanced notion of organizational structure: That of a "dual operating system", of two intertwined structures that could together explain organizational life. The first structure "formal", the other one, described by Kotter in somewhat more fuzzy and generic terms, geared towards the "social" and the interaction. From the interdependence of these structures, performance would arise. The secret would be in "building" the second of those two structures.

This is also a misunderstanding. Organizations do not have two faces, but three. All of them. And naturally. What John Kotter is missing is how actual work is happening, and what the structural laws behind work and performance are. His way of describing complex social systems as having "operating systems", as in a lifeless machine, is also entirely inappropriate in the context of living systems. The metaphor is simply under-complex.

The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.

David Hain's insight:

To collaborate effectively, you need understand power structures - formal, informal and reputational. Uncommon sense from @NilsPflaeging!

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Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre 

Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As pro-democracy and diversity marches meet Donald Trump’s inauguration, it’s a powerful time to ask, how can citizens enable new approaches to governance, and how can governments enable individuals to foster change?
Forum for the Future’s investigations into the scope for citizen innovation and its role in driving systemic change across Europe suggest that policy and management are vital — both in enabling innovation, and as a field for innovation itself.
Our 2050 scenarios for sustainable lifestyles in Europe highlighted some specific ways in which citizen innovation could transform policy, and vice versa:
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article about a revolutionary governance approach. Sustainable living needs better/wider/deeper collaboration!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.