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The Best Cure for Fear? A Little More Trust

The Best Cure for Fear? A Little More Trust | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Five ways to come together after senseless acts of violence.
David Hain's insight:

Article quote

 

"Perhaps at no other time in history have we been more skeptical of our fellow citizens. While our inclination might be to circle the wagons and become more suspicious than ever, there is another way to combat this proclivity towards wariness.

But how?

With more openness, not less."

 

Some great, simple and very actionable ideas here.

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carpe diem

carpe diem | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

My advice is to learn as much as possible, however you can. If you have the time and money for formal education, choose well and immerse yourself in it. But it is even more important to learn by doing. This means trying out new things on a regular basis. Get out there, and seize the day. Note that our interconnected economy is forcing all of us to be more innovative because replication is just too easy. Others can copy most of what you are doing as soon as you do it. The only way to stay ahead is to keep your work, and learning, in perpetual beta.


David Hain's insight:

Great advice on learning form Personal Knowledge Management guru Harold Jarche @hjarche. Blog def. worth a follow!

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Optimizing 5 negotiation strategies for better agreement

Optimizing 5 negotiation strategies for better agreement | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
There are five principal negotiating strategies.  You will probably be naturally inclined to follow one of them.  However, all of them have their advantages and disadvantages and are appropriate for different negotiating situations.
David Hain's insight:

Collaborating effectively isn't always about collaboration!

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from knowledge worker to master artisan

from knowledge worker to master artisan | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Today we have almost too many machine filters to help us seek information. These filters, algorithms and heuristics, can help discover new information but many of these are gamed by either the operators selling sponsored content, or users gaming the system. People are better information filters but only if in aggregate they provide a requisite variety of knowledge, experience, and perspective. We need to get outside of our knowledge bubbles and echo-chambers to build our knowledge networks. Tim Kastelle has identified three types of human filtering:

Naive filtering – asking the person closest to you, or the first to mind, for advice.
Expert filtering – finding the recognized expert on a subject, often with credentials from a recognized authority.
Network filtering – developing a network of experts with differing perspectives on an issue or in a field.


For important issues, such as our professions, networked experts are essential. Developing these network filters takes time. But once these networks have been developed, they become part of the value we bring to a team, an organization, or a community. Today, we are only as effective as our knowledge networks. Building networks through cooperation, which is freely sharing without expectations of direct reciprocity,  builds trust. In trusted networks, knowledge flows faster.

David Hain's insight:

@hjarche suggests that we filter our knowledge networks for max. leverage. Makes a lot of sense to me!

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Why 'Thought Diversity' Is The Future Of The Workplace

Why 'Thought Diversity' Is The Future Of The Workplace | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The future of workplace diversity is here, and it's not what you think. In fact, it's how you think.

While we've long known that gender, race, and cultural diversity create better organizations, the newest workplace frontier is all about our minds. According to a recent study by consulting and professional services company Deloitte, cultivating "diversity of thought" at your business can boost innovation and creative problem-solving.

People bring different cultures, backgrounds, and personalities to the table — and those differences shape how they think. Some people are analytical thinkers, while others thrive in creative zones. Some are meticulous planners, and others love spontaneity. By mixing up the types of thinkers in the workplace, Deloitte believes companies can stimulate creativity, spur insight, and increase efficiency.

Varying the types of thinkers in a company also helps guard against "groupthink," a dangerous tendency in groups to focus first and foremost on group conformity, often at the expense of making good decisions.
David Hain's insight:

Rethink the groupthink to really benefit from diversity of mind!

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The Psychology of Teamwork: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teams

The Psychology of Teamwork: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teams | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Imagine you’re a VIP admitted to a hospital with a serious heart condition. You need a lifesaving operation and, because of your wealth and influence, you are given the option of having a world renowned surgeon flown in to operate on you.

In those circumstances we’d all go for the star performer over the resident medical team, right?
Maybe not.

Robert Huckman and Gary Pisano from Harvard Business School challenged the status of freelancing experts by empirically measuring the success rates of more than 200 cardiac surgeons working across 43 different hospitals.

They specifically examined the success rates (patient survival rates) of highly experienced freelancers versus more bonded surgical teams.

After analyzing more than 38,000 procedures they found the performance of individual heart specialists did improve significantly with practice and experience (one for the prima donnas).

But it was only at the hospital where they did most of their work.

When the same surgeons left their usual teams to work at different hospitals their success rates returned to baseline.

It seems working with a bonded team of colleagues (doctors, nurses, anesthesiologists) helps to develop interactive routines that harness the unique talents of each team member.

The authors concluded that elite performance is not as portable as previously thought and is more a function of the “familiarity that a surgeon develops with the assets of a given organization”- a nice way of saying stars only shine due to their colleagues.
David Hain's insight:

Is everyone on the bus? Are they going to the same place? Are they working together? Handy teamwork ready reckoner!

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In the Sharing Economy, Workers Find Both Freedom and Uncertainty

In the Sharing Economy, Workers Find Both Freedom and Uncertainty | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Just after 4 a.m. on a recent Friday, while most of the neighbors in her leafy Boston suburb were still asleep, Jennifer Guidry was in the driveway of her rental apartment, her blond hair pulled back in a tidy French braid, vacuuming the inside of her car. The early-bird routine is a strategy that Ms. Guidry, a Navy veteran and former accountant, uses to mitigate the uncertainty of working in what’s known as the sharing economy.

Ms. Guidry, 35, earns money by using her own car to ferry around strangers for Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, ride services that let people summon drivers on demand via apps. She also assembles furniture and tends gardens for clients who find her on TaskRabbit, an online marketplace for chores.
David Hain's insight:

A personal story of the sharing economy - pros and cons!

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Exclusive: See How Big the Gig Economy Really Is

Exclusive: See How Big the Gig Economy Really Is | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The growing momentum of peer-to-peer economics is undeniable. When the poll asked how many Americans had used goods-exchange platforms like eBay and Etsy, as well as other new-economy services, the participation rate jumped to 70%. For most people, as they rent out their pool house or get paid to run someone’s errands, worker status is likely far from their minds. Meanwhile, highly skilled jobs, like consulting and teaching, are shifting to more gig-like models too. “There’s something nice about getting a regular paycheck,” says Arun Sundararajan, a business professor at New York University, “but we’ve got to get away from thinking that that is the only model.”

So while a change in the social contract is already under way, politicians and regulators are still scrambling to catch up. In the U.S. today, workers fall into one of two buckets: employee or independent contractor. These two categories have roots in 18th century England, when legal minds decided that servants, at the mercy of their masters for a living wage and bound to obey their orders, deserved some protections in return. The U.S. built on those in the 20th century, ­developing and ­expanding basic rules about employee wages and hours. But many of those don’t apply to contractors, who are viewed as more autonomous in the eyes of the law.
David Hain's insight:

We are all sharing more, and the ecosystem is playing catch up. Some useful stats included.

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Understanding “New Power”

Understanding “New Power” | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Power, as British philosopher Bertrand Russell defined it, is simply “the ability to produce intended effects.” Old power and new power produce these effects differently. New power models are enabled by peer coordination and the agency of the crowd—without participation, they are just empty vessels. Old power is enabled by what people or organizations own, know, or control that nobody else does—once old power models lose that, they lose their advantage.

Old power models tend to require little more than consumption. A magazine asks readers to renew their subscriptions, a manufacturer asks customers to buy its shoes. But new power taps into people’s growing capacity—and desire—to participate in ways that go beyond consumption. These behaviors, laid out in the exhibit “The Participation Scale,” include sharing (taking other people’s content and sharing it with audiences), shaping (remixing or adapting existing content or assets with a new message or flavor), funding (endorsing with money), producing (creating content or delivering products and services within a peer community such as YouTube, Etsy, or Airbnb), and co-owning (as seen in models like Wikipedia and open source software).

David Hain's insight:

There is a battle between old and new power - somewhere in 'casualties of war' is the debris of Brexit and Trump!

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The Chemistry of Networking

The Chemistry of Networking | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Simply knowing people is insufficient to build lasting business networks with them. You must like and trust them as well. However like does not mean being alike, nor does it just mean clicking the like button on Facebook …

What are your tips for moving from single to triple bonds?

In case you are wondering, I stumbled over the chemical bond idea in the shower, whilst trying to dream up an interactive networking session for Johnson and Johnson. The session was incredibly well received and gave me an excuse to buy one of those chemical bond making kits that I always wanted from childhood! 

David Hain's insight:

How to build a meaningful network - go back to science lessons. Cocktail mixed by @AcademyOfRock!

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Disrupting Power

Disrupting Power | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Social Age has changed everything: broadly speaking, it has eroded formal authority in favour of socially moderated, divergent and contextual Social Authority. This has eroded the purpose of organisations themselves, as distributed social mechanisms of production have empowered individuals and small groups, whilst making large organisations less able to react to the ever-changing nature of the world today.
David Hain's insight:

To navigate effectively in your ecosystem, it helps to know about power. @JulianStodd provides an insightful guide here.

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6 Tips for Fostering Cross-Departmental Collaboration - Financial Executives International Daily

6 Tips for Fostering Cross-Departmental Collaboration - Financial Executives International Daily | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As the influence of financial functions expands throughout organizations, their members need to work effectively with colleagues from all parts of the business. One area highlighting this trend is the intersection between finance and information technology (IT). Recent research from Robert Half Management Resources and Robert Half Technology found CFOs and CIOs are frequently working together more today than three years.

This trend isn’t limited to the C-suite. Cross-functional collaboration also is occurring more often at the staff level.

Working closely with other departments offers many benefits, but that doesn’t mean it’s all smooth sailing. In a Robert Half survey, financial professionals reported the greatest challenges they face when working with coworkers from different business units are learning to interact with a variety of personalities and managing stress during crises.

In light of these issues, how can you as a financial executive facilitate collaboration between different groups? Here are six tips:

David Hain's insight:

Practical tips formatting collaboration work - it's not rocket science...!

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What Is the Integral Approach? | Start Your Integral Life

What Is the Integral Approach? | Start Your Integral Life | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
During the last 30 years, we have witnessed a historical first: all of the world’s cultures are now available to us. In the past, if you were born, say, a Chinese, you likely spent your entire life in one culture, often in one province, sometimes in one house, living and loving and dying on one small plot of land. But today, not only are people geographically mobile, we can study, and have studied, virtually every known culture on the planet. In the global village, all cultures are exposed to each other.

Knowledge itself is now global. This means that, also for the first time, the sum total of human knowledge is available to us—the knowledge, experience, wisdom and reflection of all major human civilizations—premodern, modern, and postmodern—are open to study by anyone.

What if we took literally everything that all the various cultures have to tell us about human potential—about spiritual growth, psychological growth, social growth—and put it all on the table? What if we attempted to find the critically essential keys to human growth, based on the sum total of human knowledge now open to us? What if we attempted, based on extensive cross-cultural study, to use all of the world’s great traditions to create a composite map, a comprehensive map, an all-inclusive or integral map that included the best elements from all of them?

Sound complicated, complex, daunting? In a sense, it is. But in another sense, the results turn out to be surprisingly simple and elegant. Over the last several decades, there has indeed been an extensive search for a comprehensive map of human potentials. This map uses all the known systems and models of human growth—from the ancient shamans and sages to today’s breakthroughs in cognitive science—and distills their major components into 5 simple factors, factors that are the essential elements or keys to unlocking and facilitating human evolution.

Welcome to the Integral Model.
David Hain's insight:

It's complex, but so is life! A Wilber 101 on the integral approach to human potential!

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principles and models for the network era

principles and models for the network era | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Capitalism today is the ultimate expression of a market dominated society, where money is made from nothing, as financial traders manipulate stocks, currencies, and whatever else they can. Its final growth spurt was enabled by ubiquitous fossil fuels so that supply chains could take advantage of either cheap goods or cheap labour due to the human inequalities on our planet. But the age of oil is ending, and markets are being replaced by networks as the dominant organizing model. Nafeez Ahmed recently stated that the end of capitalism is inevitable.

“At the core of this radical re-wiring is a transformation of the human relationship with nature: moving away from top-down modes of political and economic organization, to participatory models of grassroots self-governance, localized sustainable agriculture, and equity in access to economic production.” – Medium.com

David Hain's insight:

A coherent review of key concepts in the participatory economy, from @hjarche!

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Why We Ignore the Obvious: The Psychology of Willful Blindness

Why We Ignore the Obvious: The Psychology of Willful Blindness | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Whether individual or collective, willful blindness doesn’t have a single driver, but many. It is a human phenomenon to which we all succumb in matters little and large. We can’t notice and know everything: the cognitive limits of our brain simply won’t let us. That means we have to filter or edit what we take in. So what we choose to let through and to leave out is crucial. We mostly admit the information that makes us feel great about ourselves, while conveniently filtering whatever unsettles our fragile egos and most vital beliefs. It’s a truism that love is blind; what’s less obvious is just how much evidence it can ignore. Ideology powerfully masks what, to the uncaptivated mind, is obvious, dangerous, or absurd and there’s much about how, and even where, we live that leaves us in the dark. Fear of conflict, fear of change keeps us that way. An unconscious (and much denied) impulse to obey and conform shields us from confrontation and crowds provide friendly alibis for our inertia. And money has the power to blind us, even to our better selves.
David Hain's insight:

Beware wilful blindness, especially where it becomes a collaborative phenomenon!

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Françoise Morvan's curator insight, July 20, 6:16 AM
David Hain  “Keep your baby eyes (which are the eyes of genius) on what we don’t know,”
Tom Wojick's comment, July 20, 9:58 AM
David this article appear at the time and moment for an article I'm writing! Thanks for the gift.
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Will That Cross-Cultural Coach Really Help Your Team?

Will That Cross-Cultural Coach Really Help Your Team? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for global businesses to face increasingly complex cross-cultural challenges. How do make an international merger a success? How can you help teams spanning countries and continents better collaborate? To deal with these issues, many companies are turning to coaches who specialize in helping diverse teams deal with cultural tripwires. Seems like a smart solution, right?

Yes, cross-cultural coaches can help (assuming you’ve picked a capable one). But you need to keep in mind that the coaching relationship is not culturally neutral and it’s prone to the same cultural issues that you’re trying to address in the business. In fact, the coaching-client relationship can be equally wrought with cultural tripwires.
David Hain's insight:

One possible solution to the challenges of working globally, but it's more complex than it might seem...

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Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain

Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Today’s business world is shifting swiftly and the organization needs to exhibit different styles of leadership to sustain in this turbulent period. Leadership in large organizations is more complex as it has built-in legacy which will not allow it to mobilize the decision making fast enough for business survival. The business environment has become increasingly unstable and uncertain in just the past decade or so. Leaders need to think differently to transform the complete ecosystem with his/her team members aligning with the external ecospace.  

In this context, we have come up with a new leadership framework which is relevant in today's VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. 
David Hain's insight:

Meet Rebus leadership! not sure we need yet another model, but at least it addresses the VUCA world we live in...

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Using economic analysis to take on society’s biggest issues | McKinsey & Company

Using economic analysis to take on society’s biggest issues | McKinsey & Company | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In the 25 years since its founding, the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) has published in-depth research on more than 20 countries, 30 industries, and core economic topics such as productivity and trade. More recently, our in-house think tank has started to address major societal issues too, including the economic costs associated with obesity, lack of affordable housing, and gender inequality.

MGI’s latest research tackles one of the more pressing socio-economic issues of the day: income inequality. Its analysis shows a dramatic increase in most developed economies in the number of people with flat or falling market incomes over the last decade. The result is a generation at risk of ending up ‘poorer than their parents’, with potentially serious social (and political) consequences.

In this short film Anu Madgavkar, one of the report’s authors, explores the findings and explains why she is passionate about addressing societal challenges through economic analysis. “Our role at MGI is to help frame and open up debates, bring new thinking, and identify potential interventions on major economic issues,” says Anu. “What we’re doing now is bringing economic analysis to intensely human issues.”
David Hain's insight:

Most economic indicators are pointing towards a reforming of capitalism around conscious capital, and towards developing common purpose!

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Our global institutions are not fit for purpose. It’s time for reform

Our global institutions are not fit for purpose. It’s time for reform | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Brexit vote and the candidacy of Donald Trump are not exceptional developments. They are symptoms of a wider global phenomenon – a pervasive distrust in the political class, an expression of alienation and anger by those who have been bypassed by globalization, and an awareness that our institutions, designed in the 20th century, are not fit for purpose, that is to say, they cannot address the problems of the 21st century.

The paradox is that at the very moment when we need to construct the building blocks of global governance, institutions like the European Union and the United Nations are under attack from the rising tide of populism and xenophobia.
David Hain's insight:

There has never been a greater need for developing common purpose! We are surely at a bifurcation point!

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The Blind Spot: Uncovering the Grammar of the Social Field

The Blind Spot: Uncovering the Grammar of the Social Field | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
My father is a farmer. As one of the pioneers of bio-dynamic farming in Germany, he devotes all his attention to cultivating the quality of the soil in his fields. That’s exactly what I find myself doing today, though in a very different type of field. My colleagues and I, along with countless change makers, leaders, action researchers and facilitators, are cultivating the quality of the social field. By social field I mean the structure of the relationship among individuals, groups, organizations and systems that gives rise to collective behaviors and outcomes.

When people experience a transformational social shift, they notice a profound change in the atmosphere, in the texture of the social field. But in trying to explain it, they tend to fall back on vague language; and even though people can agree on a surface description of what happened, they don’t usually know why it happened or what words to use to describe it.

Today, in most social systems, we collectively produce results that no one wants. These results show up in the form of environmental, social, and cultural destruction. The ecological divide (which disconnects self from nature), the social divide (which disconnects self from other), and the spiritual divide (which disconnects self from self) shape the larger context in every large system change today.

The intention of this paper is to uncover the grammar of the social field — the key variables that make it possible for the operating logics and modes (states and stages) of a social field to shift.
David Hain's insight:

Ploughing the social field with Otto Scharmer. Academic but insightful and enriching view of how we get on together.

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10 Reasons for Social Leadership

10 Reasons for Social Leadership | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As we move ever further into the Social Age, those mechanisms of power and control that got us this far will not be enough to get us the rest of the way: alongside hierarchy and system, we need community and trust, and those will be earned through developing strong Social Leadership as a counterpoint and compliment to formal aspects of power. Why Social Leadership? Here are ten reasons:
David Hain's insight:

The case, by @JulianStodd, for social leadership in a connected world!

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A New Visual On Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web via @medkh9

A New Visual On Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web via @medkh9 | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

This is a really useful learning resource!

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nukem777's curator insight, July 10, 8:46 AM
Love these paradigms :)
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, July 10, 7:36 PM
If you love Bloom's Taxonomy as much as I do, and use technology in your lessons, you will enjoy these resources.
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#FutureState - Resilience

#FutureState - Resilience | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In technical systems, in complex machines, we build in redundancy: the notion that when something fails, there is a system dedicated to take over from it. Social systems work differently: as an individual level, we cognitively full-back on more primitive and less flexible subsystems, whilst other community level we cover for each other, with the strength of the group filling in the weakness of the individual. The system as a whole may appear to be robust, but only up to a point.

We all know that the straw may break the camel’s back, but it can be remarkably difficult to spot which straw.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating and insightful musings on how we can develop community resilience form @JulianStodd!

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End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries?

End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Try, for a moment, to envisage a world without countries. Imagine a map not divided into neat, coloured patches, each with clear borders, governments, laws. Try to describe anything our society does – trade, travel, science, sport, maintaining peace and security – without mentioning countries. Try to describe yourself: you have a right to at least one nationality, and the right to change it, but not the right to have none.

Those coloured patches on the map may be democracies, dictatorships or too chaotic to be either, but virtually all claim to be one thing: a nation state, the sovereign territory of a “people” or nation who are entitled to self-determination within a self-governing state. So says the United Nations, which now numbers 193 of them.

And more and more peoples want their own state, from Scots voting for independence to jihadis declaring a new state in the Middle East. Many of the big news stories of the day, from conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine to rows over immigration and membership of the European Union, are linked to nation states in some way.

Even as our economies globalise, nation states remain the planet’s premier political institution. Large votes for nationalist parties in this year’s EU elections prove nationalism remains alive – even as the EU tries to transcend it.

Yet there is a growing feeling among economists, political scientists and even national governments that the nation state is not necessarily the best scale on which to run our affairs. We must manage vital matters like food supply and climate on a global scale, yet national agendas repeatedly trump the global good. At a smaller scale, city and regional administrations often seem to serve people better than national governments.

How, then, should we organise ourselves? Is the nation state a natural, inevitable institution? Or is it a dangerous anachronism in a globalised world?
David Hain's insight:

An alternative way of looking at global collaboration - fascinating read!

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Collective Intelligence: How does it emerge? | Nesta

Collective Intelligence: How does it emerge? | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
This paper discusses the cognitive, social and technological prerequisites for collective intelligence.

Key findings:
Collective intelligence emerges when there is a balance between technology, governance and joint goals.
Collaboration builds on our cognitive capabilities to think as we and have joint intensions.
Technology should make visible the assemblages of information and support the modification of knowledge.
Organisational models must mimic cultural transmission allowing for imitation, appropriation and combination.
The report includes a detailed case study of the Missing Maps project engages thousands of volunteers to map vulnerable areas for humanitarian intervention and disaster relief using satellite imagery and Openstreetmap, an open data-mapping platform. This is a powerful example of collective intelligence which allows us to analyse what are the prerequisites for new forms of collaboration.
David Hain's insight:

Harvesting collective intelligence should be a holy grail. Here's a paper & case study on the state of the art...

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Collaboration and collective impact | Nesta

Collaboration and collective impact | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
How to achieve large-scale, cross-sector collaboration and collective impact to deal with social problems.
I regularly come across reports and articles, and outputs from consultancies, claiming to have invented a new way of doing this. Yet there is not much cumulative learning in this field.

Here is a piece in which I attempt a personal view on what collaboration and collective impact are, what has been learned, and how practice could improve, hopefully to prompt more argument and less unnecessary reinvention.  
David Hain's insight:

Good practice ideas for large scale collaboration - much needed and from an excellent source!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.