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50+ Tools for Web Based Collaboration

50+ Tools for Web Based Collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

The following is a highlight of a competitive analysis the author did earlier this year when he was involved in designing software that would allow remote research teams to work together. While software is still a long way from replacing all in-person collaboration it’s becoming easier for remote or mobile workers to stay productive and communicative with their team. Certainly the tools we have available today are a vast improvement over what he used when Ihefirst tried telecommuting 12 years ago!


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
David Hain's insight:

Some new ones to me here.

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Five tools to manage a remote team

Five tools to manage a remote team | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Remote working can have benefits to both employees and employers, creating a happier team who enjoy a better work life balance, which in turn can increase productivity and flexibility for both parties. Managing remote workers can seem like a daunting task, however, with the fact that they’re not in the same office leaving managers feeling out of control. This doesn’t have to be the case – with proper systems in place and trust between staff and head office, remote working could be just the thing your business needs.
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Why the Pope’s encyclical is about much more than climate change

Why the Pope’s encyclical is about much more than climate change | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Our current economic, social and political systems appear poorly suited for more integrated and global solutions required to address the challenges of improving living standards of the world’s poor, while safeguarding the Earth’s life support systems that underpin human life and wellbeing. The asymmetries and disconnections between our social systems, economic systems and environment are significant obstacles. Sustainable development in the 21st century requires explicit recognition that social and economic development are part of—and dependent upon—a stable and resilient biosphere.
David Hain's insight:

We can't ameliorate the climate issues without becoming more connected and collaborative - a global community. Seems like a bifurcation point...

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The World Wide What?

Have you ever imagined the world without the Web? How would you do homework without Wikipedia? Or commute without CandyCrush? Or even watch this film without YouTube? 

The parallel universe of 'World Wide What?' shows us what life would be like for the greatest tech entrepreneurs if Sir Tim Berners Lee had never invented the World Wide Web. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

Great spot by Kenneth Mikkelsen!

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, June 21, 5:26 PM

An absolutely brilliant and humourous film narrated by Stephen Fry. This is a must see film for anyone interested in the internet and the people that helped shape it. 

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A New Kind of Leadership Is Emerging That's Already Saving the World

A New Kind of Leadership Is Emerging That's Already Saving the World | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
There's a new kind of leadership emerging that's gaining momentum. It has the power to transform the world in less than a decade what took multiple generations centuries to accomplish under the old paradigm.

Fueled by the power of collectivism balanced upon a substratum of unabashed individualism, the new leadership paradigm becomes its own power source when properly driven. If you and Ayn Rand don't think collectivism and individualism can coexist in the same sentence, much less be driven down the same road, you might want to ditch your rearview mirror for a glimpse into the future.

Collectivism emphasizes the interdependence of all human beings. Beyond government or political systems, we already know that collectivism that doesn't also allow for individual autonomy doesn't work as it limits human potential. Individualism is critical to cultivating natural diversity and maintaining checks and balances.
David Hain's insight:

In praise of collectivism - generating sustainable leadership. 'Coming  together to do what we can't do alone, good trickles up.' ~Huffington Post

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How to create a collaborative workplace

How to create a collaborative workplace | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

The way we work today is vastly different from how we did in previous decades. Today’s workforce is increasingly diverse, with more women and older workers than ever before, as well as being more globalised and connected. In order to understand how these changes are impacting employee wellbeing and how employers can successfully manage this over the next 15 years, Unum commissioned a report on the Future Workplace [PDF].

One of the key trends identified in the report - the “Collaborative” workplace -  is defined as one in which employees are encouraged to move between locations and teams, enabling workforces to connect and share information with a wider network of colleagues. Through the breakdown of traditional office hierarchies and conventional business structures, employees have a more personal relationship with their employer, which is beneficial to both when it comes to ensuring the position, working environment and benefits package are suitably tailored to that individual.

By 2030, adopting a collaborative workplace will mean prompting a completely open social exchange and operating a flat-structured, collaborative organisation at all levels. 

David Hain's insight:

Future Workplace Report - and it's collaborative, surprise, surprise!

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5 Marketing Lessons From The Sharing Economy

5 Marketing Lessons From The Sharing Economy | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The sharing economy, simply put, is the phenomenon where people are increasingly willing to share their home, car, clothing, goods, services—almost anything—online.

It’s having a major disruptive influence on the way business works today.  New consumer-driven businesses are cropping up quickly and taking a significant share of revenue from traditional counterparts. Just look at the hotel industry—it’s taking a hit from Airbnb.

Sharing sites like Peerby are driving a whole new commerce engine where people share anything from tools to evening dresses. And in the transportation industry, change is happening fast with companies like Uber and Lyft crowdsourcing public transportation in cities around the world.

The sharing economy has allowed new multimillion dollar businesses to grow seemingly overnight. So, how can traditional businesses leverage the sharing trend?

Here are five lessons you can use to lean into—and learn from—the new sharing economy.
David Hain's insight:

The sharing economy - threat or opportunity?  I'd say both, but focus on the latter!

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What's a connection culture, and how do we get there?

What's a connection culture, and how do we get there? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Over time, he realized, having a sense of connection means people are less stressed. Connection “makes people feel safe. It improves their decision-making ability and their creativity because they do feel safe,” Stallard said. “And when they’re in a culture that’s fast-changing, it can be threatening. And then people go into a stress response, where their bodies physiologically start to allocate blood glucose and oxygen to the ‘flight or fight’ systems. … And if they’re stuck in that state all the time because their culture is not safe, it’s a culture of control or a culture of indifference to people, then they’re very vulnerable” in their health.
David Hain's insight:

Why a connected culture is worth having - IF it feeds 6 universal human needs. Fake connections suck!

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build your own edge

build your own edge | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Every one of the major challenges facing us is complex. But our organizations are not designed for complexity. Our workplace training does not factor in complexity. While not all of our problems are complex, the simpler issues are being dealt with, especially through software and automation. Understanding complexity means working in it together and using our collective intelligence.

One example of using the collective wisdom of an organization is to map a path forward. Robert Paterson worked with US public radio, NPR, in 2005 to help determine how to adapt to the industry-wide changes wrought by social media. Six years later, Rob noted this report from The New York Times, “Amid all that creative destruction, there was a one large traditional news organization that added audience, reporters and revenue. That unlikely juggernaut was NPR.”

Part of the secret was to prepare the existing culture by embracing pathfinders from the new culture.
David Hain's insight:

Organizations cannot learn how to learn faster by continuing with their traditional methods. They need to get people to marinate in complex systems. ~ @hjarche

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Who will solve your wicked problems?

Who will solve your wicked problems? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Why do just less than half of business transformations succeed according to research? Most often, the failure is one of leadership: those in charge of driving change lack the skills necessary to do so successfully.

These leaders are not to blame. They often have long and successful track records of operational management that have seen them confront day-to-day problems and even unexpected crises with impressive results. But resolving the difficulties that force businesses to transform – the “wicked problems” that can seem complex and incomprehensible – requires a completely different set of competencies.
David Hain's insight:

6 capabilities to address wicked issues.  Very useful for connectors!

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Networks for Change: Full Benefit Accounting

Networks for Change: Full Benefit Accounting | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Last week while having a discussion with a group about food system economics, I was reminded that the word “externalities” does not always refer to something bad. An externality can also be something beneficial that is not formally accounted for by “the market.” This had me reflecting on what can happen in networks, really any collaborative endeavor, where some of the real “goods” remain out of sight, on the edges of peripheral vision, at least with respect to where people typically tend to concentrate focus.

For example, I just looked at a report to a funder from a network with which I’ve been working the past 18 months. In putting together this striking piece, the coordinator interviewed members of the Network Design Team to gauge how they have been impacted and influenced by their experiences on the Team and with the network. It is worth noting that part of the early effort of our work together was to expand and diversify this Team. What came out were some very rich stories about personal growth and development, important and inspiring work for racial equity in members’ home institutions and communities and a new and richer understanding of each person’s own work. More specifically, people mentioned the following “goods”:
David Hain's insight:

However insightful we are at seeing and redirecting forces in the physical world, unless we also address patterns in the human mind, our work cannot last.”– Joel Glanzberg, HT @davidwilcox @JenniferSertl

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How Companies Are Getting Collaboration Wrong

How Companies Are Getting Collaboration Wrong | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Businesses have embraced employee collaboration lately, from software that helps bring together remote teams to open, workspaces designed to better connect employees, with the hope that bringing different types of workers together will lead to breakthrough ideas and solutions.

But is collaboration at work all it’s cracked up to be?

Maybe not. Recent research led by Jesse Shore at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business has found that collaboration sometimes hinders problem-solving because individuals in big groups tend to parrot one another, resulting in a narrow set of solutions.

“We just get caught up in our own gospel around collaboration,” says Ethan Bernstein, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Harvard Business School, and a coauthor of the paper, with Dr. Shore and David Lazer of Northeastern University.
David Hain's insight:

Problem solving has 2 parts - divergent and convergent. Does collaboration help both? Not always, says research.

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Co-Creation in Government

Co-Creation in Government | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Bringing innovation to the public sector is famously difficult. But efforts that open up the public sector value chain to multiple stakeholders can deliver impressive results.

Via Peter Verschuere
David Hain's insight:

Austerity and demographics point to genuine co-creation as a way forward for public services. Hard but sustainable!

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Managing Complexity | Digital Tonto

Managing Complexity | Digital Tonto | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Back in the 15th Century, Leonardo da Vinci, the great genius of the Middle Ages, said that “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”  Most modern managers would agree.  Every good operation works hard to streamline its processes down to the barest essentials.

However, the world is a complex place and it’s only getting more so, which is why many management thinkers have been urging businesses to embrace complexity, to become, in effect, system thinkers rather than reductionists.

As Richard Straub noted in a recent article in HBR, that effort has largely failed and we shouldn’t be surprised.  Executives are paid to be accountable and are understandably reluctant to give themselves up to the complexity Gods.  In truth, complexity is not something we need to embrace, merely something we need to accept and manage.
David Hain's insight:

We need to take a network view, manage what we don’t understand and become less wrong over time.  Simplicity, after all, is not so simple. ~ Greg Satell

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4 Things You Should Know About Platforms

4 Things You Should Know About Platforms | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Steve Jobs didn’t want to build an app store.  As Walter Isaacson describes in his biography of Apple’s founder, the famously controlling Jobs was wary of the “bandwidth” needed to police a veritable army of third party developers.  At first, he wouldn’t even discuss it.

Yet eventually, even Jobs had to relent and the App store has become an enormous success.  Last year, developers reaped $15 billion on the platform.  In fact, third party apps have become so central to the iPhone, it’s hard to imagine it without them.  Increasingly, products are becoming platforms.

It’s become kind of a Joy’s Law for the networked era—the best resources and capabilities always lie somewhere else.  So unless you can pull in people outside your company to improve your product, you’re going to be at a distinct disadvantage.  Yet for all the talk about platforms, there’s little guidance about what makes them tick. Here’s what you need to know.
David Hain's insight:

It is no longer control of assets and resources that determines capability, but access to ecosystems, and platforms. Forbes

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Too Many Infrastructure Projects Go It Alone

Too Many Infrastructure Projects Go It Alone | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
There is one best way to get big projects done. It has nothing to do with the technical side, and everything to do with people and relationships. Systemic problems that affect everyone but are beyond the ability of any one person to solve require collaboration skills. To renew and reinvent our aging transportation infrastructure, we must turn our attention to coalition-building. Classic leadership lessons apply.

To create the conditions that support innovation, leaders need to build connections across companies, industries, and sectors.
David Hain's insight:

Moss Kanter on collaboration ecosystems.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, May 16, 5:36 AM

Collaboration - Vision - Communication .."it is not enough to convene people only once to ask for their support, nor can leaders assume that just because something has been said, it has been heard and agreed to. Frequent communication and reminders of the vision keep coalition members engaged throughout often-arduous processes with numerous ups and downs. When projects accomplish many things at once (like the Miami tunnel did), coalition-building is easier."

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Strategic Partnerships Successful | IMD

Strategic Partnerships Successful | IMD | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In recent years the growth of business partnerships has accelerated, driven by the benefits of risk sharing, resource pooling and technology. According to a 2014 PwC survey, more than 80% of CEOs in the United States are currently looking for strategic partnerships or intend to do so in the near future. Nevertheless, in the last three years, only 65% of those seeking new strategic alliances have been successful in forming one.
Most often, strategic partnerships are established when companies need to acquire new capabilities within their existing business. They inevitably involve challenges that have to be resolved efficiently to ensure the longevity and success of the alliance. If these challenges are not tackled, the partnership will more than likely fail, which, as the empirical research shows, happens in more than half of all cases (Dyer, Kale and Singh, 2001). 

In order to avoid failure and effectively build joint capabilities, strategic partnerships should be based on trust and follow five simple steps.  
David Hain's insight:

IMD ~ Clarity and open communication the foundation of strategic partnerships - just like most relationships!

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The four traits of collaborative leadership - Virgin.com

The four traits of collaborative leadership - Virgin.com | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Some businesses have been disrupting the leadership model for decades – driving down responsibility and decision-making to the lowest possible level, or ‘inverting’ the pyramid into upside-down business models where the board sits at the bottom. But the concept of individual leadership has undergone a more recent transformation, and it’s clear that businesses with their mind on thriving are repositioning the unique role leaders can play in generating success. In short the role of CEO has moved from the one, to the many.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration is mindset first! 

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The personalized and the personal: Socially responsible innovation through big data

The personalized and the personal: Socially responsible innovation through big data | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Societal views surrounding big data technologies, business models, and government policies are therefore set to evolve as kaleidoscopically as have the technologies themselves in recent years. Informed observers anticipate a trough in the enthusiasm surrounding business analytics created by excessive big data boosterism in recent years.7 Such boom-and-bust patterns are of course common to many business ideas that capture the collective imagination of the business press. But the emerging attitude of data skepticism pertains to societal aspects of data analytics that are not shared by other technologies that have marched through the various stations of the hype cycle. As we will argue shortly, this owes less to the vaunted bigness (in the sense of raw data volume, variety, velocity) of the data than to a psychological, behavioral, and social content that many find invasive or “creepy.”
David Hain's insight:

'When brought to life with ethical thinking & insights from behavioral science, data analytics offers 21C approach to doing well by doing good.' ~ Deloitte

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The top 10 nations for bridging the digital divide

The top 10 nations for bridging the digital divide | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Singapore has overtaken Finland to become the most effective user of digital technology in the world, according to the latest Networked Readiness Index (NRI). However, it is European nations that dominate the leader-board, with seven top 10 places this year. Singapore is the sole remaining Asian Tiger following the demotion of Hong Kong and South Korea.

The NRI is part of the World Economic Forum’s Global Information Technology Report 2015: ICTs for Inclusive Growth. The NRI identifies the capacity of countries to leverage Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), by assessing the overall political and business environment, the level of ICT readiness and usage among the population, businesses and government, as well as the overall impacts of ICTs on the economy and society at large.
David Hain's insight:

Thanks @Nadine Hack

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Need to Solve a Problem? Take a Break From Collaborating — HBS Working Knowledge

Need to Solve a Problem? Take a Break From Collaborating — HBS Working Knowledge | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“WHEN IT COMES TO SOLVING PROBLEMS, CONNECTEDNESS IS A DOUBLE-EDGED SWORD”
Unfortunately, it turns out that inducing more collaboration may hinder the most important part of problem-solving: actually solving the problem. While connecting employees does increase the ability to gather facts during the early stages of tackling a problem, it also inhibits the ability to analyze those facts and find a solution, a team of Boston researchers reports.
David Hain's insight:

The benefits of collaboration can be great, but there are costs involved too. Think before you leap!

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Knoco stories: Andrew Carnegie on Knowledge Management

Knoco stories: Andrew Carnegie on Knowledge Management | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
RT @nickknoco: Andrew Carnegie on Knowledge Management http://t.co/dD43Ej4JGX #KM #KMers #knoco
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Hyperconnectivity And Business Simplification: The Perfect Union For Transforming A Complex World?

Hyperconnectivity And Business Simplification: The Perfect Union For Transforming A Complex World? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Think hyperconnectivity only brings complexity? See how embracing the Digital Economy can lead to greater simplification.
David Hain's insight:

The more data we collect, there’s always a potential to become paralyzed and more complex. But, that doesn’t have to be the case. Data should drive, not hinder...

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Oscar Berg: Introducing – The Digital Collaboration Canvas

Oscar Berg: Introducing – The Digital Collaboration Canvas | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Although the tasks we need to perform come in all shapes and sizes, most rely on a number of basic capabilities such as finding information or locating expertise. The more interdependent our work becomes, the more important these capabilities become to us. If they are weak, our ability to collaborate and create value together as an organization becomes crippled. Therefore improving such capabilities can both reduce a lot of the waste in knowledge work and enable people to work smarter together.

Over the years I have developed a framework of 9 capabilities that are important for knowledge work in general and for collaboration efforts in particular. I use the framework to help clients understand their current ways of working, identify problems and opportunities for improvement, and to explore better ways of working – with digital tools. The framework is illustrated below, inspired by a model by Harold Jarche who combined Ian McCarthy’s honeycomb of social media with an early version of my capabilities framework.
David Hain's insight:

Useful collaboration framework via Oscar Berg, HT Harold Jarche.

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The four global forces breaking all the trends | McKinsey

The four global forces breaking all the trends | McKinsey | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
While it is full of opportunities, this era is deeply unsettling. And there is a great deal of work to be done. We need to realize that much of what we think we know about how the world works is wrong; to get a handle on the disruptive forces transforming the global economy; to identify the long-standing trends that are breaking; to develop the courage and foresight to clear the intellectual decks and prepare to respond. These lessons apply as much to policy makers as to business executives, and the process of resetting your internal navigation system can’t begin soon enough.

There is an urgent imperative to adjust to these new realities. Yet, for all the ingenuity, inventiveness, and imagination of the human race, we tend to be slow to adapt to change. There is a powerful human tendency to want the future to look much like the recent past. On these shoals, huge corporate vessels have repeatedly foundered. Revisiting our assumptions about the world we live in—and doing nothing—will leave many of us highly vulnerable. Gaining a clear-eyed perspective on how to negotiate the changing landscape will help us prepare to succeed.
David Hain's insight:

How the world is changing, via McKinsey.

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Forget the Vision, Make the Connections

Forget the Vision, Make the Connections | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

New leaders don’t spend nearly enough time and effort being intentional about how they show up and how they spend their own time. The effort they devote to forming meaningful connections with the people in the organization is almost an afterthought.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

So true, Kenneth! I'm working with an organisation just now where connecting is exactly what is required for a better future, yet what happens is the meet all the time, till they are begging for respite, and all they talk about is tasks and transactions!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 27, 9:51 AM

(From the article): How can you be more intentional? Hall frames intentionality in her own work in eight words that guide each of her interactions: “I want it to matter that we met.” And it should matter for both her and the person she is meeting. There is an implied flexibility in the time horizon; it may matter immediately or several years down the road. Challenge yourself: “I want it to matter that I hold this position,” or “I want it to matter that I am your boss.” How does this affect how you will show up to deliver short-term results and create long-term impact?

ALONSO MICHELE's curator insight, May 17, 6:23 AM

Une autre vision du leadership!

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.