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When the Voice Inside Your Head Turns Bad.....

When the Voice Inside Your Head Turns Bad..... | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Empowering yourself to challenge your inner critic.
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Collaborationweb
People working together to make things better
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How GE is becoming a truly global network 

How GE is becoming a truly global network  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The GE that I work for now is not the same company as the one I joined in 1978, with stand-alone businesses in a holding company. Today, we operate on the premise that our whole is greater than the sum of the parts, and the dynamic networking and exchange of ideas and solutions across GE is a performance differentiator for each business. Close to 70 percent of our business now takes place outside the United States, so this networking exchange needs to reach far and wide.

The problem, of course, is that as businesses grow larger and scale up internationally, more silos start to pop up. It’s not always easy for employees to stay connected and share ideas that drive innovation and add new value, or to view sharing and multiple teaming as a competitive advantage. That has been GE’s challenge: how to connect more than 300,000 people, operating in over 180 countries, in a dynamic and practical way without adding more process and bureaucracy that slows them down. Without a radical shift in everyday working behavior—in employees’ relationships with the company and with one another—silos will remain, and the sort of cross-industry and horizontal collaboration that companies like GE need to foster for growth is not going to happen.
David Hain's insight:

GE's efforts to develop collaborative advantage - makes a nice case study!

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Collaboration with Emotional Intelligence: For Earth and All of Us • Six Seconds

Collaboration with Emotional Intelligence: For Earth and All of Us • Six Seconds | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Collaboration is a way of practicing emotional intelligence
At Six Seconds, we also believe in practice, turning ideas into action in pursuit of noble goals. For that reason, we are also focusing during this quarter on the environment and Collaborating for the Earth. Through our EQ Cafés, we are offering opportunities for team learning and discovering ways to use emotional intelligence to help confront the environmental challenges we all face. To join an EQ Café on Brains for Collaboration/Collaborating for the Earth, please check these local listings and be sure to check back since EQ Cafés will be added throughout the quarter.
How can emotional intelligence, or EQ, help us transform our understanding into positive action? EQ means, very simply, making the best decisions by bringing together your thinking and feeling. It means navigating your emotions, applying consequential thinking, engaging your intrinsic motivation, and exercising optimism. It means giving yourself to the world by increasing empathy and pursuing a noble goal that may extend beyond your lifetime to benefit others. And it means fostering positive relationships, connecting with others to create transformation through collaboration, which is essential for solving big challenges.
David Hain's insight:

Six Seconds work is well worth looking up. Focus this quarter on collaboration!

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We've stopped trusting institutions and started trusting strangers

We've stopped trusting institutions and started trusting strangers | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Something profound is changing our concept of trust, says Rachel Botsman. While we used to place our trust in institutions like governments and banks, today we increasingly rely on others, often strangers, on platforms like Airbnb and Uber and through technologies like the blockchain. This new era of trust could bring with it a more transparent, inclusive and accountable society — if we get it right. Who do you trust?

David Hain's insight:

How you get trust from a bunch of initial strangers lies at the heart of collaboration!

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 19, 9:17 AM
Who do you trust?
 
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The Big Benefits of Unified Business Collaboration - Social Business Spotlight Blog

The Big Benefits of Unified Business Collaboration - Social Business Spotlight Blog | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“The Total Economic Impact™ of IBM Connections,” a commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting in February 2017, on behalf of IBM, provides proof of the cost savings and other benefits that a unified collaboration solution delivers. For the study, Forrester conducted in-depth interviews with four companies from different geographies and industries and ranging in size from 1,200 to more than 50,000 employees.
While the companies all had collaboration as their overarching goal, each had more specific aims for their program. The hotel chain headquartered in Mauritius wanted to improve customer experience and drive brand loyalty through the sharing of knowledge and best practices among employees. The engineering and construction services firm based in Europe wanted to boost employee engagement and mobile productivity for field workers. The US transportation firm sought to unite its distributed workforce on a single platform, while the Southeast Asian logistics firm needed to improve IT efficiency and protect confidential data.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration case studies...

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Internet Access a Necessity in the Talent Economy 

Internet Access a Necessity in the Talent Economy  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Most modern-day jobs require a reliable internet connection, and that need is not expected to subside anytime soon.

When viewed as a sector in 2011, internet-related consumption and expenditure was bigger than agriculture or energy, according to “Internet Matters: The Net’s Sweeping Impact on Growth, Jobs, and Prosperity,” a 2011 report from McKinsey Global Institute. The study goes on to say that internet access creates jobs, finding that it created 2.6 jobs for every one lost.

David Hain's insight:

Is the world you are fishing in for talented people becoming smaller?

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Thriving, resilience and surviving

Thriving, resilience and surviving | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
uncertainty and not knowing, in all of its vulnerability, is a gift — it’s the birthplace of our ability to thrive.

But it’s also the potential birthplace of failure, conflict and destruction. The thing is we don’t know what’s going to happen until we lean in. If we lean in too hard, without safe to fail conditions and it doesn’t work out, surviving might be the best we can manage. Therefore, wisdom is called for when creating space for this kind of work.

In a recent podcast, Parker Palmer suggested this kind of uncertainty and complexity can only be held in community. In well organised groups who come together to create this space for each other to navigate uncertainty. Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze tell a similar story in their book Walk out Walk on. Communities who use storytelling and courageous conversations amongst other practises to navigate uncertainty in a healthy way.

I believe these inspirational change makers are onto something very important, speaking about the critical role of community for wisely working with uncertainty.

David Hain's insight:

The critical role of community in dealing with our VUCA world!

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Leadership Development Has Failed. But There’s a Better Model 

Leadership Development Has Failed. But There’s a Better Model  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We are swamped by leadership advice from countless gurus. In the U.S., we give the leadership development industry more than $24 billion annually. It is the No. 1 category in corporate learning and development spending.

What do we get for all this time and money spent on studying leadership? If the purpose of leadership is to effectuate positive change, the answer is “not much.” According to Deloitte, the return on assets for the U.S. economy has steadily declined since 1965. These days, the mighty stumble daily. In 1958, a company could expect to stay on the S&P 500 list for 61 years. Now the average is just 18 years. Domestic productivity growth averaged only 0.34 percent per year between 2011 and 2015, down 82 percent from the growth experienced between 1990 and 2010.

That’s the business view. Have investments in leadership development resulted in an inspired workforce? Again, the answer is no. The industry that consumes billions of dollars intended to develop leaders has failed the leader, the organization and society. It’s time to boldly say “the emperor has no clothes.” A revolution is forming, presenting you, the learning leader with a big question. Will you lead that revolution, be toppled by it, or just get run over?
David Hain's insight:

Teams that learn together perform better together! Consider team development instead/as well as leadership development programmes!

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Is there still time to save our trust in government?

Is there still time to save our trust in government? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
What are the costs of lost public trust? High trust is associated with co-operative behaviour, while low trust is associated with resistance, even to things that seem to be in the person’s overall best interest. Greater trust reduces transaction costs and, by extension can increase compliance while reducing the need for enforcement. The bottom line is, trust influences the relationship between citizens and government and in turn has an impact on the outcomes of public policy. The weight of evidence shows that low trust entails costs for public policy, and thus, there is a strong argument in favour of building more trust.
We are also seeing the fallout from the systemic toxicity of growing inequality. Trust in government is increasing for some, but for others there is a growing perception of government run by and for “establishment elites.” What can be done? Some of the recommendations covered in the book include actions in the following policy areas:
David Hain's insight:

Low trust is the greatest enemy of collaboration, and the greatest  hurdle to ecumenic progress!

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Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World

Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Here are some Culture Keys to optimize your chances for success while networking across cultures:

1. Recognize
Identify your personal preferences and expectations around the networking process.

2. Open Your Mind
Consider that people may have networking protocols and expectations that differ from your own.

Look for cues that suggest the best way to proceed (or query someone else from that culture — even a quick online search could yield some useful information).

3. Identify Ways to Adjust
Be prepared to be patient or move faster than usual depending on the culture within which you are trying network.

Accept that you may need to nurture connections in ways that might feel out of sync or unrelated to what you are hoping to get out of the relationship.
David Hain's insight:

You can't become a networked citizen of the world without understanding the way things are done in other cultures!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 29, 6:32 PM
This is increasingly important. Teachers teach in classrooms that are multicultural. What does that mean to them?
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How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities

How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

It’s easy to say that different organizations can collaborate to achieve, but if it’s so easy in practice, the world would have solved challenges such as access to clean water by now.

Dr. John Bryson, an expert in collaborative governance and the McKnight Presidential Professor of Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, notes that, “Collaboration is not an easy answer to hard problems; it’s a hard answer to hard problems and there’s no getting around it.”

In a recent paper with colleagues Dr. Fran Ackerman and Dr. Colin Eden in Public Administration Review, he used CCL’s model of Direction-Alignment-Commitment — the shared tasks of leadership — to help explain the results of their study on public-private partnerships (PPPs).

David Hain's insight:

Collaboration is hard - but the process is pretty simple!

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Phyllis L Trower's curator insight, March 22, 2:43 PM
common sense to common practice 
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Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough

Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’ve spent 20 years in Silicon Valley working alongside the tech industry in a variety of capacities. From my experience, effective collaboration is the key ingredient to making innovation happen. And that’s reflected in our survey: Collaboration is already a priority for many CEOs, with 86 percent saying collaboration is a very important skill. That direct link between collaboration and innovation is something also borne out in PwC’s ongoing Innovation Benchmark study, where leaders cite innovative behaviors and culture as integral to success.

Without collaboration and the cross-disciplinary fertilization that it enables, it’s difficult to generate radically new ideas. Without challenges from outside your domain, it’s too easy to get stuck in the same boxes. Without outsiders to test your preconceptions and push you to defend your more outrageous ideas, it’s hard to develop inspiration into true innovation.

David Hain's insight:

All the technology in the world won't guarantee success, without a genuinely collaborative mindset and skills!

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Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics

Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Like a garden, the economy consists of an environment and interdependent elements—sun, soil, seed, water. But far more than a garden, the economy also contains the expectations and interpretations all the agents have about what all the other agents want and expect. And that invisible web of human expectations becomes, in an everamplifying spiral, both cause and effect of external circumstances. Thus the housing-led financial crisis. Complexity scientists describe it in terms of “feedback loops.” Financier George Soros has described it as “reflexivity.” What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is.

Traditional economics holds that the economy is an equilibrium system; that things tend, over time, to even out and return to “normal.” Complexity economics shows that the economy, like a garden, is never in perfect balance or stasis and is always both growing and shrinking. And like an untended garden, an economy left entirely to itself tends toward unhealthy imbalances. This is a very different starting point, and it leads to very different conclusions about what the government should do about the economy.
David Hain's insight:

Think of the ecosystem as a complex web. Become a good gardener! "What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is."

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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A new, practical theory of leadership, organizational power and structure has emerged. It is ending one of the biggest misunderstandings in organizational science: The notion that organizations can be described through a single structure, a structure that has since the glory days of the railway corporation in the middle of the 19th century been usually depicted in the shape of org charts.

While it is clear to most practitioners today that org charts, or connected boxes, cannot even remotely describe organizational complexity and reality, theory and organization development have not advanced much from the original metaphor of organizations as top-down pyramids, lines structures, silos and stand-alone functions. Just a few years back, John P. Kotter started to promote a slightly advanced notion of organizational structure: That of a "dual operating system", of two intertwined structures that could together explain organizational life. The first structure "formal", the other one, described by Kotter in somewhat more fuzzy and generic terms, geared towards the "social" and the interaction. From the interdependence of these structures, performance would arise. The secret would be in "building" the second of those two structures.

This is also a misunderstanding. Organizations do not have two faces, but three. All of them. And naturally. What John Kotter is missing is how actual work is happening, and what the structural laws behind work and performance are. His way of describing complex social systems as having "operating systems", as in a lifeless machine, is also entirely inappropriate in the context of living systems. The metaphor is simply under-complex.

The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.

David Hain's insight:

To collaborate effectively, you need understand power structures - formal, informal and reputational. Uncommon sense from @NilsPflaeging!

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Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre 

Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As pro-democracy and diversity marches meet Donald Trump’s inauguration, it’s a powerful time to ask, how can citizens enable new approaches to governance, and how can governments enable individuals to foster change?
Forum for the Future’s investigations into the scope for citizen innovation and its role in driving systemic change across Europe suggest that policy and management are vital — both in enabling innovation, and as a field for innovation itself.
Our 2050 scenarios for sustainable lifestyles in Europe highlighted some specific ways in which citizen innovation could transform policy, and vice versa:
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article about a revolutionary governance approach. Sustainable living needs better/wider/deeper collaboration!

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An Agenda for the Future of Global Business

An Agenda for the Future of Global Business | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Business needs to remain deeply embedded in society to positively affect it. In fact, business can create solutions to society’s most fundamental problems. Take long-term and youth unemployment as an example. In Europe, numerous business-led initiatives address this hard-to-crack issue, working closely with public agencies and thousands of volunteers and employers. These initiatives offer structured labor market reintegration and skill-building programs. Some programs do this very successfully, creating a three to four times higher chance to bring unemployed youth back into the labor market and helping small and medium firms tap into new pools of talent. Such social business initiatives, if kept close to the core, also help build strategically relevant capabilities such as the external orchestration of people and assets, a key skill in executing a shaping or ecosystem approach to strategy.
David Hain's insight:

This is a good read for everyone interested in globalisation and post-capitalism!

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Community Conversations 

“Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.”
(Attributed to Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962), social activist, first lady and the wife of US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.)
Community Conversations provide a safe space in which people come together for thoughtful discussion and dialogue about big visions and shared values — past, present, and future. Today, more than ever, we need this kind of dialogue.
Since very few curricula teach us how to correctly structure a meaningful conversation, a simple process is needed.
With a simple process, you will find that meaningful conversation is not only possible, it is, in fact, deeply appreciated. For many participants the process is often transformational. Participants have expressed surprise that it was possible to “go so deep” with people they did not know and expressed gratitude for the experience.
David Hain's insight:

Communities with great dialogue can make big things happen. The techniques exist, it just takes a bit of will!

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How Facebook wants to save the world

How Facebook wants to save the world | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In the beginning, Facebook Live was for celebrities such as Ricky Gervais, Gordon Ramsay and Deepak Chopra to send real-time video to their fans. Then in April 2016, Facebook expanded the service to everyone. The real power of the service didn't become clear until a couple of months later, when a woman named Diamond Reynolds turned on Facebook Live moments after police shot her boyfriend Philando Castile in a suburb of Saint Paul, Minnesota - letting the rest of the world watch as the scene played out (see our live-streaming feature in this issue). That was not something the company anticipated, says Fidji Simo, director of product for Facebook Live, but it now sees that kind of video as the way forward.

Disaster response professionals are already starting to use Facebook Live and other real-time video services to get "eyes on the ground" and decide where to send resources. And compared to even the most strongly worded public advisory message, live video is a much more powerful way to warn members of the public away from danger.
David Hain's insight:

Could Facebook really lead a global collaboration to make the world's communities safer? Seems that way...

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How to Build a Connected Workforce

How to Build a Connected Workforce | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

When people work in silos, different units and capabilities are pulled in when the time is right. Legal might hand off to marketing, or the user experience team is consulted only after design is completed. This approach won’t cut it in today’s mobile- and social-first digital world, in which everything has to be simple, seamless, and intuitive from the start. And it particularly doesn’t work when it comes to digital and technology initiatives. It’s hard, for instance, to develop a cohesive and unified digital vision when 68 percent of digital and tech spending occurs outside of IT budgets.

Building a working environment conducive to collaboration is key. Rather than encourage people to toil in isolation or only with their peer groups, modern working environments must allow for a cross section of specialists to be in close proximity to one another, even if that closeness is achieved only in cyberspace. When they learn how their teammates work, colleagues will develop the next imperative for a connected workforce: the ability to understand one another’s working language.

David Hain's insight:

Closeness in pursuit of collaboration doesn't have to be physical. Indeed, it often can't be - so how can digital means help?

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Moving to Social

Moving to Social | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It can be difficult to move a traditional training organization directly to a social learning focus.  I have found through experience that it is easier to start with performance consulting and then expand to social and collaborative learning. This reflects my own career as a military training development officer, later becoming one of the first Certified Performance Technologists in Canada, and then getting immersed in social networks for learning and performance.

“the labor market increasingly rewards social skills  … social skills reduce coordination costs” – The growing importance of social skills in the labor market (2015)

The aim of this workshop is to cover the components of a modern workplace learning strategy that includes training, performance support, and social learning. It is designed for anyone working in or interested in training, organizational learning, human resources, and organizational development. The workshop comprises 10 main activities, plus resources, links, and tips.
David Hain's insight:

A great online course for collaborators!

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Emergent Community

Emergent Community | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’m using a series of pieces to explore aspects of the Socially Dynamic Organisation and, today, my thoughts have turned to culture and community. I often describe ‘community’ according to two principles: shared purpose and shared values. Shared purpose can be imposed, whilst shared values must emerge from within the system itself. You cannot impose shared values, only create the conditions for them to emerge. Dependent upon the co-existence (or otherwise) of these two factors, a community can be either ‘coherent’ or ‘incoherent’, e.g. if it has shared purpose and values, it is ‘coherent’. If It has been given shared purpose, but lacks shared values, it may still function on one level, but be ‘incoherent’ in culture e.g. not bonded by trust and values.
David Hain's insight:

Purposeful musings on community development form @JulianStodd!

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Now is the Time to Be Rooted In Reality – Age of Awareness 

Now is the Time to Be Rooted In Reality – Age of Awareness  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Cooperation has won out as the pathway to an increasing sophistication of “solutions” in the long history of struggle for survival and reproduction. This is elegantly seen in the way ant colonies have worked for millions of years. For many ant species, all members of the colony are genetic twins hailing from the sperm of a single father and birthed from the same queen. They work with such extreme efficiency that a single colony can have thousands of members and take over the bulk of the biomass for the environment they are living in.
Sound familiar? This is pretty much what humans are doing to the planet today.
We have become such excellent cooperators — super-charged by our unique ability to live out cultural patterns that build on what came before — that we have overwhelmed the capacity of the Earth to support us. According to the best estimates available, we have crossed four of the nine critical thresholds any of which would mean collapse of our global civilization.
This is what is REALLY going on. We are now in “overshoot and collapse” mode for our civilization. And we need to address this situation with increasing urgency with each passing day.

David Hain's insight:

Time to put the pieces together, collectively, and increase collaboration in search of a sustainable way of living?

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Two moons over Korea

Two moons over Korea | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
These different ways of seeing things — Western, categorical, abstracted; Asian, situational, interrelated — explain why Koreans have a different moon. The Western moon has a face that’s just a face and nothing else. The Korean moon is more complex: there’s a rabbit in motion, though we never see the motion; that’s something you have to infer. The rabbit is making tteok, an act of transformation — rice into rice cake — that mirrors the moon’s ceaseless cycling. It’s also a social act: rice is communally planted and harvested, and the making of tteok is a community affair. To see a rabbit making tteok is to see a web of connections, interactions and transformations. The moon is never just the moon. Everything exists in relation to everything else.
For an American, much of the fascination of living in Korea is learning to see these threads of interconnection. To get there, we have to judge less, let go of our craving for absolutes, and be willing to hover in a kind of no man’s land of uncertainty that feels very unnatural. But if you’re willing to endure the dark for a l
David Hain's insight:

Two fundamentally different ways of looking at the world - East and West. I have learned that there's e is much to commend the way that I wasn't taught!

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All That We Share

We live in a time where we quickly put people in boxes. Maybe we have more in common than what we think? Introducing All That We Share. The English version.
David Hain's insight:

Fantastic resource for all collaborators and wannabes - also for the sceptics among us!

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From Individuals to Teams: the Importance of Emotional Intelligence - Meeteor

From Individuals to Teams: the Importance of Emotional Intelligence - Meeteor | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Inspired by Goleman’s work, researchers Vanessa Druskat and Steven Wolff looked at emotional intelligence at the group level. They found that “just like individuals, the most effective teams are emotionally intelligent ones,” and that “a group’s Emotional Intelligence isn’t simply the sum of its members.”
Instead, if you think about a group as one entity, a group’s emotional intelligence is its ability to create a shared set of norms that manage the emotional process. These norms help a group build trust, establish identity, and achieve results. By establishing norms at three levels of interaction – the individuals within a team, the team itself, and the team interacting with other teams – leaders can help their teams build awareness of and manage emotions.
David Hain's insight:

EQ tips for better team collaboration.

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, February 8, 12:20 PM

Emotionally intelligent teams work and play better together. First step as a team leader - develop your EQ.

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Life’s economy is primarily based on collaborative rather than competitive advantage

Life’s economy is primarily based on collaborative rather than competitive advantage | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
If we want to re-design economics based on what we know about life’s strategy to create conditions conducive to life, we need to question some basic assumptions upon which the narrative underlying our current economic systems is built. The narrative of separation has predisposed us to focus on scarcity, competition, and the short-term maximization of individual benefit as the basis on which to create an economic system. Life’s evolutionary story shows that systemic abundance can be unlocked through collaboratively structured symbiotic networks that optimize the whole system so human communities and the rest of life can thrive.
David Hain's insight:

A powerful and persuasive argument to seek collaboration for abundance rather than competition for asset protection!

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.