Collaborationweb
11.7K views | +2 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by David Hain from Social Media Resources & e-learning
onto Collaborationweb
Scoop.it!

Slideshare Infographic: The Quiet Giant of Content Marketing

Slideshare Infographic: The Quiet Giant of Content Marketing | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

More on SlideShare!

 


Via marketingIO, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, donhornsby, Amy Melendez, AlGonzalezinfo
David Hain's insight:

I think Slideshare is just a great knowledge and collaboration tool, getting better as time goes on.

more...
marketingIO's comment, January 10, 2013 3:18 PM
SlideShare is a must. We included a "how to" scoop to help out: http://sco.lt/59cGR7
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 11, 2013 3:22 PM

This is eye opening, thanks Amy!

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:39 PM

From the article:  "Data collected by ComScore and presented in this infographic reveals SlideShare has 5 times more traffic from business owners than Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn(which now owns SlideShare)." ~ Deb

Collaborationweb
People working together to make things better
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Disrupting Power

Disrupting Power | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Social Age has changed everything: broadly speaking, it has eroded formal authority in favour of socially moderated, divergent and contextual Social Authority. This has eroded the purpose of organisations themselves, as distributed social mechanisms of production have empowered individuals and small groups, whilst making large organisations less able to react to the ever-changing nature of the world today.
David Hain's insight:

To navigate effectively in your ecosystem, it helps to know about power. @JulianStodd provides an insightful guide here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

6 Tips for Fostering Cross-Departmental Collaboration - Financial Executives International Daily

6 Tips for Fostering Cross-Departmental Collaboration - Financial Executives International Daily | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As the influence of financial functions expands throughout organizations, their members need to work effectively with colleagues from all parts of the business. One area highlighting this trend is the intersection between finance and information technology (IT). Recent research from Robert Half Management Resources and Robert Half Technology found CFOs and CIOs are frequently working together more today than three years.

This trend isn’t limited to the C-suite. Cross-functional collaboration also is occurring more often at the staff level.

Working closely with other departments offers many benefits, but that doesn’t mean it’s all smooth sailing. In a Robert Half survey, financial professionals reported the greatest challenges they face when working with coworkers from different business units are learning to interact with a variety of personalities and managing stress during crises.

In light of these issues, how can you as a financial executive facilitate collaboration between different groups? Here are six tips:

David Hain's insight:

Practical tips formatting collaboration work - it's not rocket science...!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

What Is the Integral Approach? | Start Your Integral Life

What Is the Integral Approach? | Start Your Integral Life | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
During the last 30 years, we have witnessed a historical first: all of the world’s cultures are now available to us. In the past, if you were born, say, a Chinese, you likely spent your entire life in one culture, often in one province, sometimes in one house, living and loving and dying on one small plot of land. But today, not only are people geographically mobile, we can study, and have studied, virtually every known culture on the planet. In the global village, all cultures are exposed to each other.

Knowledge itself is now global. This means that, also for the first time, the sum total of human knowledge is available to us—the knowledge, experience, wisdom and reflection of all major human civilizations—premodern, modern, and postmodern—are open to study by anyone.

What if we took literally everything that all the various cultures have to tell us about human potential—about spiritual growth, psychological growth, social growth—and put it all on the table? What if we attempted to find the critically essential keys to human growth, based on the sum total of human knowledge now open to us? What if we attempted, based on extensive cross-cultural study, to use all of the world’s great traditions to create a composite map, a comprehensive map, an all-inclusive or integral map that included the best elements from all of them?

Sound complicated, complex, daunting? In a sense, it is. But in another sense, the results turn out to be surprisingly simple and elegant. Over the last several decades, there has indeed been an extensive search for a comprehensive map of human potentials. This map uses all the known systems and models of human growth—from the ancient shamans and sages to today’s breakthroughs in cognitive science—and distills their major components into 5 simple factors, factors that are the essential elements or keys to unlocking and facilitating human evolution.

Welcome to the Integral Model.
David Hain's insight:

It's complex, but so is life! A Wilber 101 on the integral approach to human potential!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

principles and models for the network era

principles and models for the network era | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Capitalism today is the ultimate expression of a market dominated society, where money is made from nothing, as financial traders manipulate stocks, currencies, and whatever else they can. Its final growth spurt was enabled by ubiquitous fossil fuels so that supply chains could take advantage of either cheap goods or cheap labour due to the human inequalities on our planet. But the age of oil is ending, and markets are being replaced by networks as the dominant organizing model. Nafeez Ahmed recently stated that the end of capitalism is inevitable.

“At the core of this radical re-wiring is a transformation of the human relationship with nature: moving away from top-down modes of political and economic organization, to participatory models of grassroots self-governance, localized sustainable agriculture, and equity in access to economic production.” – Medium.com

David Hain's insight:

A coherent review of key concepts in the participatory economy, from @hjarche!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why We Ignore the Obvious: The Psychology of Willful Blindness

Why We Ignore the Obvious: The Psychology of Willful Blindness | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Whether individual or collective, willful blindness doesn’t have a single driver, but many. It is a human phenomenon to which we all succumb in matters little and large. We can’t notice and know everything: the cognitive limits of our brain simply won’t let us. That means we have to filter or edit what we take in. So what we choose to let through and to leave out is crucial. We mostly admit the information that makes us feel great about ourselves, while conveniently filtering whatever unsettles our fragile egos and most vital beliefs. It’s a truism that love is blind; what’s less obvious is just how much evidence it can ignore. Ideology powerfully masks what, to the uncaptivated mind, is obvious, dangerous, or absurd and there’s much about how, and even where, we live that leaves us in the dark. Fear of conflict, fear of change keeps us that way. An unconscious (and much denied) impulse to obey and conform shields us from confrontation and crowds provide friendly alibis for our inertia. And money has the power to blind us, even to our better selves.
David Hain's insight:

Beware wilful blindness, especially where it becomes a collaborative phenomenon!

more...
Françoise Morvan's curator insight, July 20, 6:16 AM
David Hain  “Keep your baby eyes (which are the eyes of genius) on what we don’t know,”
Tom Wojick's comment, July 20, 9:58 AM
David this article appear at the time and moment for an article I'm writing! Thanks for the gift.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Will That Cross-Cultural Coach Really Help Your Team?

Will That Cross-Cultural Coach Really Help Your Team? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for global businesses to face increasingly complex cross-cultural challenges. How do make an international merger a success? How can you help teams spanning countries and continents better collaborate? To deal with these issues, many companies are turning to coaches who specialize in helping diverse teams deal with cultural tripwires. Seems like a smart solution, right?

Yes, cross-cultural coaches can help (assuming you’ve picked a capable one). But you need to keep in mind that the coaching relationship is not culturally neutral and it’s prone to the same cultural issues that you’re trying to address in the business. In fact, the coaching-client relationship can be equally wrought with cultural tripwires.
David Hain's insight:

One possible solution to the challenges of working globally, but it's more complex than it might seem...

more...
wubugz.net's curator insight, July 18, 11:36 PM

100% safe & legit hacked westernunion transfers,logins,moneygram transfers, hacked paypal transfers /accounts, credit card top up...

****WE DO NOT SELL ANY FAKE WU BUG SOFTWARE, NO DUMB PAYPAL MONEY ADDERS, NO PAID TO CLICK, FOREX,HYIP...

****LIVE SCREEN SHARE OR VIDEO PROOF OF ACCOUNTS OR TRANSFERS BEFORE PAYMENT IS MADE!.

****WE DEAL STRICTLY ON TRANSFERS AND LOGINS.

ALL transfers are legit and backed by secure dedicated offshore servers..

****no charge back or trace backs.

we have moneyback and Rienburstment policy with 24/7 support.

visit http://www.wubugz.net

https://youtu.be/v6L0oq-kQE4

contact email ______wubugs58@gmail.com
contact skype ______wu hackerz
contact website_____www.wubugz.net
contact icq ______663-468-297
contact phone ______+1(251-589-7809

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain

Exhibiting Rebus Leadership in the Complex Domain | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Today’s business world is shifting swiftly and the organization needs to exhibit different styles of leadership to sustain in this turbulent period. Leadership in large organizations is more complex as it has built-in legacy which will not allow it to mobilize the decision making fast enough for business survival. The business environment has become increasingly unstable and uncertain in just the past decade or so. Leaders need to think differently to transform the complete ecosystem with his/her team members aligning with the external ecospace.  

In this context, we have come up with a new leadership framework which is relevant in today's VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. 
David Hain's insight:

Meet Rebus leadership! not sure we need yet another model, but at least it addresses the VUCA world we live in...

more...
wubugz.net's curator insight, July 17, 6:25 PM

100% safe,secured legit hacked westernunion transfers,logins,moneygram transfers, hacked paypal transfers /accounts, credit card top up...

****WE DO NOT SELL ANY FAKE WU BUG SOFTWARE, NO DUMB PAYPAL MONEY ADDERS, NO PAID TO CLICK, FOREX,HYIP...

****LIVE SCREEN SHARE OR VIDEO PROOF OF ACCOUNTS OR TRANSFERS BEFORE PAYMENT IS MADE!.

****WE DEAL STRICTLY ON TRANSFERS AND LOGINS.

ALL transfers are legit and backed by secure dedicated offshore servers..

****no charge back or trace backs.

we have moneyback and Rienburstment policy with 24/7 support.

visit http://www.wubugz.net

https://youtu.be/v6L0oq-kQE4

contact email ______wubugs58@gmail.com
contact skype ______wu hackerz
contact website_____www.wubugz.net
contact icq ______663-468-297
contact phone ______+1(251-589-7809


>>>>>>> *** www.wubugz.net*** <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>> Visit *** www.wubugz.net *** for real screenshot proof of accounts and transfers.
>>>>>>>>>> Contact *** wubugs58@gmail.com*** for transfers.

 

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Using economic analysis to take on society’s biggest issues | McKinsey & Company

Using economic analysis to take on society’s biggest issues | McKinsey & Company | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In the 25 years since its founding, the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) has published in-depth research on more than 20 countries, 30 industries, and core economic topics such as productivity and trade. More recently, our in-house think tank has started to address major societal issues too, including the economic costs associated with obesity, lack of affordable housing, and gender inequality.

MGI’s latest research tackles one of the more pressing socio-economic issues of the day: income inequality. Its analysis shows a dramatic increase in most developed economies in the number of people with flat or falling market incomes over the last decade. The result is a generation at risk of ending up ‘poorer than their parents’, with potentially serious social (and political) consequences.

In this short film Anu Madgavkar, one of the report’s authors, explores the findings and explains why she is passionate about addressing societal challenges through economic analysis. “Our role at MGI is to help frame and open up debates, bring new thinking, and identify potential interventions on major economic issues,” says Anu. “What we’re doing now is bringing economic analysis to intensely human issues.”
David Hain's insight:

Most economic indicators are pointing towards a reforming of capitalism around conscious capital, and towards developing common purpose!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Our global institutions are not fit for purpose. It’s time for reform

Our global institutions are not fit for purpose. It’s time for reform | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Brexit vote and the candidacy of Donald Trump are not exceptional developments. They are symptoms of a wider global phenomenon – a pervasive distrust in the political class, an expression of alienation and anger by those who have been bypassed by globalization, and an awareness that our institutions, designed in the 20th century, are not fit for purpose, that is to say, they cannot address the problems of the 21st century.

The paradox is that at the very moment when we need to construct the building blocks of global governance, institutions like the European Union and the United Nations are under attack from the rising tide of populism and xenophobia.
David Hain's insight:

There has never been a greater need for developing common purpose! We are surely at a bifurcation point!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Blind Spot: Uncovering the Grammar of the Social Field

The Blind Spot: Uncovering the Grammar of the Social Field | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
My father is a farmer. As one of the pioneers of bio-dynamic farming in Germany, he devotes all his attention to cultivating the quality of the soil in his fields. That’s exactly what I find myself doing today, though in a very different type of field. My colleagues and I, along with countless change makers, leaders, action researchers and facilitators, are cultivating the quality of the social field. By social field I mean the structure of the relationship among individuals, groups, organizations and systems that gives rise to collective behaviors and outcomes.

When people experience a transformational social shift, they notice a profound change in the atmosphere, in the texture of the social field. But in trying to explain it, they tend to fall back on vague language; and even though people can agree on a surface description of what happened, they don’t usually know why it happened or what words to use to describe it.

Today, in most social systems, we collectively produce results that no one wants. These results show up in the form of environmental, social, and cultural destruction. The ecological divide (which disconnects self from nature), the social divide (which disconnects self from other), and the spiritual divide (which disconnects self from self) shape the larger context in every large system change today.

The intention of this paper is to uncover the grammar of the social field — the key variables that make it possible for the operating logics and modes (states and stages) of a social field to shift.
David Hain's insight:

Ploughing the social field with Otto Scharmer. Academic but insightful and enriching view of how we get on together.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons for Social Leadership

10 Reasons for Social Leadership | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As we move ever further into the Social Age, those mechanisms of power and control that got us this far will not be enough to get us the rest of the way: alongside hierarchy and system, we need community and trust, and those will be earned through developing strong Social Leadership as a counterpoint and compliment to formal aspects of power. Why Social Leadership? Here are ten reasons:
David Hain's insight:

The case, by @JulianStodd, for social leadership in a connected world!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Education Matters
Scoop.it!

A New Visual On Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web via @medkh9

A New Visual On Bloom's Taxonomy for The Web via @medkh9 | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

This is a really useful learning resource!

more...
nukem777's curator insight, July 10, 8:46 AM
Love these paradigms :)
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, July 10, 7:36 PM
If you love Bloom's Taxonomy as much as I do, and use technology in your lessons, you will enjoy these resources.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

#FutureState - Resilience

#FutureState - Resilience | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In technical systems, in complex machines, we build in redundancy: the notion that when something fails, there is a system dedicated to take over from it. Social systems work differently: as an individual level, we cognitively full-back on more primitive and less flexible subsystems, whilst other community level we cover for each other, with the strength of the group filling in the weakness of the individual. The system as a whole may appear to be robust, but only up to a point.

We all know that the straw may break the camel’s back, but it can be remarkably difficult to spot which straw.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating and insightful musings on how we can develop community resilience form @JulianStodd!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries?

End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Try, for a moment, to envisage a world without countries. Imagine a map not divided into neat, coloured patches, each with clear borders, governments, laws. Try to describe anything our society does – trade, travel, science, sport, maintaining peace and security – without mentioning countries. Try to describe yourself: you have a right to at least one nationality, and the right to change it, but not the right to have none.

Those coloured patches on the map may be democracies, dictatorships or too chaotic to be either, but virtually all claim to be one thing: a nation state, the sovereign territory of a “people” or nation who are entitled to self-determination within a self-governing state. So says the United Nations, which now numbers 193 of them.

And more and more peoples want their own state, from Scots voting for independence to jihadis declaring a new state in the Middle East. Many of the big news stories of the day, from conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine to rows over immigration and membership of the European Union, are linked to nation states in some way.

Even as our economies globalise, nation states remain the planet’s premier political institution. Large votes for nationalist parties in this year’s EU elections prove nationalism remains alive – even as the EU tries to transcend it.

Yet there is a growing feeling among economists, political scientists and even national governments that the nation state is not necessarily the best scale on which to run our affairs. We must manage vital matters like food supply and climate on a global scale, yet national agendas repeatedly trump the global good. At a smaller scale, city and regional administrations often seem to serve people better than national governments.

How, then, should we organise ourselves? Is the nation state a natural, inevitable institution? Or is it a dangerous anachronism in a globalised world?
David Hain's insight:

An alternative way of looking at global collaboration - fascinating read!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Collective Intelligence: How does it emerge? | Nesta

Collective Intelligence: How does it emerge? | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
This paper discusses the cognitive, social and technological prerequisites for collective intelligence.

Key findings:
Collective intelligence emerges when there is a balance between technology, governance and joint goals.
Collaboration builds on our cognitive capabilities to think as we and have joint intensions.
Technology should make visible the assemblages of information and support the modification of knowledge.
Organisational models must mimic cultural transmission allowing for imitation, appropriation and combination.
The report includes a detailed case study of the Missing Maps project engages thousands of volunteers to map vulnerable areas for humanitarian intervention and disaster relief using satellite imagery and Openstreetmap, an open data-mapping platform. This is a powerful example of collective intelligence which allows us to analyse what are the prerequisites for new forms of collaboration.
David Hain's insight:

Harvesting collective intelligence should be a holy grail. Here's a paper & case study on the state of the art...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Collaboration and collective impact | Nesta

Collaboration and collective impact | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
How to achieve large-scale, cross-sector collaboration and collective impact to deal with social problems.
I regularly come across reports and articles, and outputs from consultancies, claiming to have invented a new way of doing this. Yet there is not much cumulative learning in this field.

Here is a piece in which I attempt a personal view on what collaboration and collective impact are, what has been learned, and how practice could improve, hopefully to prompt more argument and less unnecessary reinvention.  
David Hain's insight:

Good practice ideas for large scale collaboration - much needed and from an excellent source!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Emergent Culture

Emergent Culture | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’m using a series of pieces to explore aspects of the Socially Dynamic Organisation and, today, my thoughts have turned to culture and community. I often describe ‘community’ according to two principles: shared purpose and shared values. Shared purpose can be imposed, whilst shared values must emerge from within the system itself. You cannot impose shared values, only create the conditions for them to emerge. Dependent upon the co-existence (or otherwise) of these two factors, a community can be either ‘coherent’ or ‘incoherent’, e.g. if it has shared purpose and values, it is ‘coherent’. If It has been given shared purpose, but lacks shared values, it may still function on one level, but be ‘incoherent’ in culture e.g. not bonded by trust and values.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughts on coherence and community, via @julianstodd.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

When is a crowd wise? | Nesta

When is a crowd wise? | Nesta | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Making the right connections can create huge value. The world is full of problems in need of solutions, and solutions in need of problems. The designers of new platforms want to make the world a smarter and better place, and also quite like the idea of being the ‘go to’ platform for innovation.

But how close is anyone to delivering on their promise? At Nesta we have used quite a few of these platforms. We’ve supported some (like Leading Edge Only which links big corporates with inventors), and our challenges.org site provides a comprehensive tool that’s grown out of the challenge prize team's work.

All the examples listed above are impressive in their own ways, and I don’t doubt that before long some very powerful tools for matching solutions and problems, innovators and organisations wanting answers, will emerge. But I've ended up fairly sceptical about many of the ones I see. The platform aspect often turns out to be useful - but not nearly as decisive as many predicted a few years ago, mainly because the matching process is far more subtle than today’s platform technologies can handle. Instead it’s the combination of the online and offline processes that often turns out to be most important, but is missing from most of the proposals I see.
David Hain's insight:

Nest's Geoff Mulgan on the way to make better connections. Great read!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

There Is No ‘I’ in Team When It Comes to Emotional Intelligence

There Is No ‘I’ in Team When It Comes to Emotional Intelligence | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We know that tasks are accomplished through collaborations between people and tools rather than single individuals, yet we still tend to default to the individual’s perspective when determining needs, designing interventions and evaluating results. What would it mean to look at learning and performance from a team rather than an individual perspective?

To answer this question, consider two ways of thinking about cognition at the team level. Collective cognition directly reflects the sum of its parts. It’s an aggregate of the individuals’ properties within the team. Holistic cognition, in contrast, is something other than an aggregate of individual capabilities. Through team processes such as communication, decision-making and collaboration, there is a set of knowledge, skills and attitudes that emerge only at the team level; it is non-existent within individuals.

This is particularly important in complex settings that require sophisticated awareness of the environment and mental models. Disastrous outcomes in this kind of scenario have played out many times over. Historically, gaps at the team level, rather than individual capabilities, have contributed to epic catastrophes, from the Challenger and Columbia space shuttle explosions to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear meltdowns.
David Hain's insight:

Developing collective emotional intelligence needed for effective collaboration!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Cooperation emerges when groups are small and memories are long, study finds

Cooperation emerges when groups are small and memories are long, study finds | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The tragedy of the commons, a concept described by ecologist Garrett Hardin, paints a grim view of human nature. The theory goes that, if a resource is shared, individuals will act in their own self-interest, but against the interest of the group, by depleting that resource.
Yet examples of cooperation and sharing abound in nature, from human societies down to single-celled bacteria.
In a new paper, published in the journal Scientific Reports, University of Pennsylvania researchers use game theory to demonstrate the complex set of traits that can promote the evolution of cooperation. Their analysis showed that smaller groups in which actors had longer memories of their fellow group members' actions were more likely to evolve cooperative strategies.
The work suggests one possible advantage of the human's powerful memory capacity: it has fed our ability as a society to cooperate.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article on how we can cooperate to avoid the tragedy of the commons!

more...
Claude Emond's comment, June 28, 8:49 AM
Great find David. Going to scoop it all over the place. Cheers from Montreal
Claude Emond's curator insight, June 28, 8:56 AM

Great findings. Let's remember what others mean to us and set our organizations to encourage self-organized small cells (holarchies) acting and collaborating together to make the ultimate difference and create lasting value for everybody

Claude Emond's curator insight, June 28, 8:57 AM

Great findings. Let's remember what others mean to us and set our organizations to encourage self-organized small cells (holarchies) acting and collaborating together to make the ultimate difference and create lasting value for everybody

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Don’t Ask To Pick My Brain. — ReadThink 

Don’t Ask To Pick My Brain. — ReadThink  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
And 11 other tips for building a strong professional network.
David Hain's insight:

Thoughts on how to best build personal networks!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Creating the Socially Dynamic Organisation

Creating the Socially Dynamic Organisation | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I don’t think it’s too much to ask: indeed, i think that those organisations who ignore the pressures of the ecosystem of the Social Age, are threatened with extinction. And rightly so: the Victorian architecture of control that surround many people within organisations today is no longer fit for purpose. The Future Org must be adapted, the future of work, different.
David Hain's insight:

Thinking future orgs out loud with @JulianStodd. Really helpful framing for what collaboration implies...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Christian Felber and the Economy for the Common Good 

Christian Felber and the Economy for the Common Good  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Christian Felber is not just an activist, but a scholar and an entrepreneur. He’s a lecturer at the Vienna University of Economics and Business and author of several bestsellers including: “50 Suggestions for a Fairer World”, “New Values for the Economy”, “Let’s save the Euro!”, “Change Everything: Creating an economy for the common good” and “Money. The new rules of the game”. He initiated the movement of the “Economy for the Common Good” and the project “Bank for the Common Good” (ECG).

He did his homework. What is the common good? Looking into constitutions everywhere – he studied what people thought was fair and just. There are commonalities of what a good, purposeful life and a just society entail. Felber co-founded Attac Austria, a group of 12 Austrian entrepreneurs who started to apply these constitutional principles in business, trying to create a new model that transcended the old polarity of communism and capitalism. The Economy for the Common Good (ECG) movement was born. Today about 1750 companies, primarily from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, have declared their support to ECG and are serving the common good while trying to improve the
David Hain's insight:

A reminder that the ultimate role of the economy is to serve the common good!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Extreme Collaboration

Extreme Collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We have complex problems in the world today. We will solve them better TOGETHER. Technology has brought us an interconnectedness that brings an enormous opportunity for collaboration. My wish is that we not only embrace collaboration, but bump it up a level to “extreme collaboration”. Where we don’t just accept collaboration as necessary, but we actively seek it out. Where we don’t just need to get what we want, but we want to get what we both want. Where we don’t just share what information/knowledge is necessary, but we share everything because we realize that the more we see, the more we can appreciate, the more we can learn, and the more ideas we can generate together. I know many who tell me that I’m not realistic, that it will never work, and it’s just a pipe dream - but I will suggest that the most extraordinary changes are going to come when we create possibilities that aren’t realistic, that no one thinks can ever be done, or that it’s just a crazy dream.
David Hain's insight:

Passionate advocacy for a growth mindset, and the potential for collaboration to realise abundance?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A New Growth Theory — Work Futures

A New Growth Theory — Work Futures | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
But two aspects of work have changed dramatically.
The most successful firms are themselves multi-sided markets in interaction with entities “outside”, enabling interaction between customers and network partners. These firms are the new market platforms. It is now more expensive to internalize than to link and network.
Second, the products/services the platform firm sells to its clients are not offerings of the firm per se, but offerings created by specific network players in specific situations of “local” network interaction. Scale and scope are combined.
The new task is to understand network phenomena.
David Hain's insight:

In the connected world we need to understand networks much better. Here's some progressive thinking on that issue!

more...
No comment yet.
Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.