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The Tweeting Pope has a lesson for your business | Internet Psychologist | Graham Jones

The Tweeting Pope has a lesson for your business | Internet Psychologist | Graham Jones | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Pope is more popular than Justin Bieber on Twitter and this popularity has a lesson for anyone running an online business.

Via Get Clients Online, Anne Egros
David Hain's insight:

Wonder if he's on Scoopit yet?

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 7, 2013 3:33 PM

very interesting...

Collaborationweb
People working together to make things better
Curated by David Hain
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Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World

Building Relationships Across Cultures In Today's World | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Here are some Culture Keys to optimize your chances for success while networking across cultures:

1. Recognize
Identify your personal preferences and expectations around the networking process.

2. Open Your Mind
Consider that people may have networking protocols and expectations that differ from your own.

Look for cues that suggest the best way to proceed (or query someone else from that culture — even a quick online search could yield some useful information).

3. Identify Ways to Adjust
Be prepared to be patient or move faster than usual depending on the culture within which you are trying network.

Accept that you may need to nurture connections in ways that might feel out of sync or unrelated to what you are hoping to get out of the relationship.
David Hain's insight:

You can't become a networked citizen of the world without understanding the way things are done in other cultures!

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How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities

How to Use Collaborative Leadership to Address Complexities | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

It’s easy to say that different organizations can collaborate to achieve, but if it’s so easy in practice, the world would have solved challenges such as access to clean water by now.

Dr. John Bryson, an expert in collaborative governance and the McKnight Presidential Professor of Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, notes that, “Collaboration is not an easy answer to hard problems; it’s a hard answer to hard problems and there’s no getting around it.”

In a recent paper with colleagues Dr. Fran Ackerman and Dr. Colin Eden in Public Administration Review, he used CCL’s model of Direction-Alignment-Commitment — the shared tasks of leadership — to help explain the results of their study on public-private partnerships (PPPs).

David Hain's insight:

Collaboration is hard - but the process is pretty simple!

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Phyllis L Trower's curator insight, March 22, 2:43 PM
common sense to common practice 
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Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough

Collaboration for innovation: Why technology alone isn’t enough | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’ve spent 20 years in Silicon Valley working alongside the tech industry in a variety of capacities. From my experience, effective collaboration is the key ingredient to making innovation happen. And that’s reflected in our survey: Collaboration is already a priority for many CEOs, with 86 percent saying collaboration is a very important skill. That direct link between collaboration and innovation is something also borne out in PwC’s ongoing Innovation Benchmark study, where leaders cite innovative behaviors and culture as integral to success.

Without collaboration and the cross-disciplinary fertilization that it enables, it’s difficult to generate radically new ideas. Without challenges from outside your domain, it’s too easy to get stuck in the same boxes. Without outsiders to test your preconceptions and push you to defend your more outrageous ideas, it’s hard to develop inspiration into true innovation.

David Hain's insight:

All the technology in the world won't guarantee success, without a genuinely collaborative mindset and skills!

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Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics

Complexity Economics Shows Us Why Laissez-Faire Economics Always Fails - Evonomics | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Like a garden, the economy consists of an environment and interdependent elements—sun, soil, seed, water. But far more than a garden, the economy also contains the expectations and interpretations all the agents have about what all the other agents want and expect. And that invisible web of human expectations becomes, in an everamplifying spiral, both cause and effect of external circumstances. Thus the housing-led financial crisis. Complexity scientists describe it in terms of “feedback loops.” Financier George Soros has described it as “reflexivity.” What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is.

Traditional economics holds that the economy is an equilibrium system; that things tend, over time, to even out and return to “normal.” Complexity economics shows that the economy, like a garden, is never in perfect balance or stasis and is always both growing and shrinking. And like an untended garden, an economy left entirely to itself tends toward unhealthy imbalances. This is a very different starting point, and it leads to very different conclusions about what the government should do about the economy.
David Hain's insight:

Think of the ecosystem as a complex web. Become a good gardener! "What I think you think about what I want creates storms of behavior that change what is."

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Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity

Org Physics: How a triad of structures allows companies to absorb complexity | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A new, practical theory of leadership, organizational power and structure has emerged. It is ending one of the biggest misunderstandings in organizational science: The notion that organizations can be described through a single structure, a structure that has since the glory days of the railway corporation in the middle of the 19th century been usually depicted in the shape of org charts.

While it is clear to most practitioners today that org charts, or connected boxes, cannot even remotely describe organizational complexity and reality, theory and organization development have not advanced much from the original metaphor of organizations as top-down pyramids, lines structures, silos and stand-alone functions. Just a few years back, John P. Kotter started to promote a slightly advanced notion of organizational structure: That of a "dual operating system", of two intertwined structures that could together explain organizational life. The first structure "formal", the other one, described by Kotter in somewhat more fuzzy and generic terms, geared towards the "social" and the interaction. From the interdependence of these structures, performance would arise. The secret would be in "building" the second of those two structures.

This is also a misunderstanding. Organizations do not have two faces, but three. All of them. And naturally. What John Kotter is missing is how actual work is happening, and what the structural laws behind work and performance are. His way of describing complex social systems as having "operating systems", as in a lifeless machine, is also entirely inappropriate in the context of living systems. The metaphor is simply under-complex.

The new, emerging theory of organizations is this: Every organization has three kinds of power, and three forms of leadership, three structures. This is not a menu. There is no decision to make about having all three structures, or not. None of the three structures is optional, or nice to have. They are part of organizational physics - universal laws that apply to every organization, large or small, old or new, for profit or social.

David Hain's insight:

To collaborate effectively, you need understand power structures - formal, informal and reputational. Uncommon sense from @NilsPflaeging!

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Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre 

Time to start a governance revolution? – Futures Centre  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
As pro-democracy and diversity marches meet Donald Trump’s inauguration, it’s a powerful time to ask, how can citizens enable new approaches to governance, and how can governments enable individuals to foster change?
Forum for the Future’s investigations into the scope for citizen innovation and its role in driving systemic change across Europe suggest that policy and management are vital — both in enabling innovation, and as a field for innovation itself.
Our 2050 scenarios for sustainable lifestyles in Europe highlighted some specific ways in which citizen innovation could transform policy, and vice versa:
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article about a revolutionary governance approach. Sustainable living needs better/wider/deeper collaboration!

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An Agenda for the Future of Global Business

An Agenda for the Future of Global Business | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Business needs to remain deeply embedded in society to positively affect it. In fact, business can create solutions to society’s most fundamental problems. Take long-term and youth unemployment as an example. In Europe, numerous business-led initiatives address this hard-to-crack issue, working closely with public agencies and thousands of volunteers and employers. These initiatives offer structured labor market reintegration and skill-building programs. Some programs do this very successfully, creating a three to four times higher chance to bring unemployed youth back into the labor market and helping small and medium firms tap into new pools of talent. Such social business initiatives, if kept close to the core, also help build strategically relevant capabilities such as the external orchestration of people and assets, a key skill in executing a shaping or ecosystem approach to strategy.
David Hain's insight:

This is a good read for everyone interested in globalisation and post-capitalism!

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Community Conversations 

“Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.”
(Attributed to Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962), social activist, first lady and the wife of US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.)
Community Conversations provide a safe space in which people come together for thoughtful discussion and dialogue about big visions and shared values — past, present, and future. Today, more than ever, we need this kind of dialogue.
Since very few curricula teach us how to correctly structure a meaningful conversation, a simple process is needed.
With a simple process, you will find that meaningful conversation is not only possible, it is, in fact, deeply appreciated. For many participants the process is often transformational. Participants have expressed surprise that it was possible to “go so deep” with people they did not know and expressed gratitude for the experience.
David Hain's insight:

Communities with great dialogue can make big things happen. The techniques exist, it just takes a bit of will!

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How Facebook wants to save the world

How Facebook wants to save the world | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In the beginning, Facebook Live was for celebrities such as Ricky Gervais, Gordon Ramsay and Deepak Chopra to send real-time video to their fans. Then in April 2016, Facebook expanded the service to everyone. The real power of the service didn't become clear until a couple of months later, when a woman named Diamond Reynolds turned on Facebook Live moments after police shot her boyfriend Philando Castile in a suburb of Saint Paul, Minnesota - letting the rest of the world watch as the scene played out (see our live-streaming feature in this issue). That was not something the company anticipated, says Fidji Simo, director of product for Facebook Live, but it now sees that kind of video as the way forward.

Disaster response professionals are already starting to use Facebook Live and other real-time video services to get "eyes on the ground" and decide where to send resources. And compared to even the most strongly worded public advisory message, live video is a much more powerful way to warn members of the public away from danger.
David Hain's insight:

Could Facebook really lead a global collaboration to make the world's communities safer? Seems that way...

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How to Build a Connected Workforce

How to Build a Connected Workforce | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

When people work in silos, different units and capabilities are pulled in when the time is right. Legal might hand off to marketing, or the user experience team is consulted only after design is completed. This approach won’t cut it in today’s mobile- and social-first digital world, in which everything has to be simple, seamless, and intuitive from the start. And it particularly doesn’t work when it comes to digital and technology initiatives. It’s hard, for instance, to develop a cohesive and unified digital vision when 68 percent of digital and tech spending occurs outside of IT budgets.

Building a working environment conducive to collaboration is key. Rather than encourage people to toil in isolation or only with their peer groups, modern working environments must allow for a cross section of specialists to be in close proximity to one another, even if that closeness is achieved only in cyberspace. When they learn how their teammates work, colleagues will develop the next imperative for a connected workforce: the ability to understand one another’s working language.

David Hain's insight:

Closeness in pursuit of collaboration doesn't have to be physical. Indeed, it often can't be - so how can digital means help?

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Moving to Social

Moving to Social | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It can be difficult to move a traditional training organization directly to a social learning focus.  I have found through experience that it is easier to start with performance consulting and then expand to social and collaborative learning. This reflects my own career as a military training development officer, later becoming one of the first Certified Performance Technologists in Canada, and then getting immersed in social networks for learning and performance.

“the labor market increasingly rewards social skills  … social skills reduce coordination costs” – The growing importance of social skills in the labor market (2015)

The aim of this workshop is to cover the components of a modern workplace learning strategy that includes training, performance support, and social learning. It is designed for anyone working in or interested in training, organizational learning, human resources, and organizational development. The workshop comprises 10 main activities, plus resources, links, and tips.
David Hain's insight:

A great online course for collaborators!

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Emergent Community

Emergent Community | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I’m using a series of pieces to explore aspects of the Socially Dynamic Organisation and, today, my thoughts have turned to culture and community. I often describe ‘community’ according to two principles: shared purpose and shared values. Shared purpose can be imposed, whilst shared values must emerge from within the system itself. You cannot impose shared values, only create the conditions for them to emerge. Dependent upon the co-existence (or otherwise) of these two factors, a community can be either ‘coherent’ or ‘incoherent’, e.g. if it has shared purpose and values, it is ‘coherent’. If It has been given shared purpose, but lacks shared values, it may still function on one level, but be ‘incoherent’ in culture e.g. not bonded by trust and values.
David Hain's insight:

Purposeful musings on community development form @JulianStodd!

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Now is the Time to Be Rooted In Reality – Age of Awareness 

Now is the Time to Be Rooted In Reality – Age of Awareness  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Cooperation has won out as the pathway to an increasing sophistication of “solutions” in the long history of struggle for survival and reproduction. This is elegantly seen in the way ant colonies have worked for millions of years. For many ant species, all members of the colony are genetic twins hailing from the sperm of a single father and birthed from the same queen. They work with such extreme efficiency that a single colony can have thousands of members and take over the bulk of the biomass for the environment they are living in.
Sound familiar? This is pretty much what humans are doing to the planet today.
We have become such excellent cooperators — super-charged by our unique ability to live out cultural patterns that build on what came before — that we have overwhelmed the capacity of the Earth to support us. According to the best estimates available, we have crossed four of the nine critical thresholds any of which would mean collapse of our global civilization.
This is what is REALLY going on. We are now in “overshoot and collapse” mode for our civilization. And we need to address this situation with increasing urgency with each passing day.

David Hain's insight:

Time to put the pieces together, collectively, and increase collaboration in search of a sustainable way of living?

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Two moons over Korea

Two moons over Korea | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
These different ways of seeing things — Western, categorical, abstracted; Asian, situational, interrelated — explain why Koreans have a different moon. The Western moon has a face that’s just a face and nothing else. The Korean moon is more complex: there’s a rabbit in motion, though we never see the motion; that’s something you have to infer. The rabbit is making tteok, an act of transformation — rice into rice cake — that mirrors the moon’s ceaseless cycling. It’s also a social act: rice is communally planted and harvested, and the making of tteok is a community affair. To see a rabbit making tteok is to see a web of connections, interactions and transformations. The moon is never just the moon. Everything exists in relation to everything else.
For an American, much of the fascination of living in Korea is learning to see these threads of interconnection. To get there, we have to judge less, let go of our craving for absolutes, and be willing to hover in a kind of no man’s land of uncertainty that feels very unnatural. But if you’re willing to endure the dark for a l
David Hain's insight:

Two fundamentally different ways of looking at the world - East and West. I have learned that there's e is much to commend the way that I wasn't taught!

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All That We Share

We live in a time where we quickly put people in boxes. Maybe we have more in common than what we think? Introducing All That We Share. The English version.
David Hain's insight:

Fantastic resource for all collaborators and wannabes - also for the sceptics among us!

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From Individuals to Teams: the Importance of Emotional Intelligence - Meeteor

From Individuals to Teams: the Importance of Emotional Intelligence - Meeteor | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Inspired by Goleman’s work, researchers Vanessa Druskat and Steven Wolff looked at emotional intelligence at the group level. They found that “just like individuals, the most effective teams are emotionally intelligent ones,” and that “a group’s Emotional Intelligence isn’t simply the sum of its members.”
Instead, if you think about a group as one entity, a group’s emotional intelligence is its ability to create a shared set of norms that manage the emotional process. These norms help a group build trust, establish identity, and achieve results. By establishing norms at three levels of interaction – the individuals within a team, the team itself, and the team interacting with other teams – leaders can help their teams build awareness of and manage emotions.
David Hain's insight:

EQ tips for better team collaboration.

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, February 8, 12:20 PM

Emotionally intelligent teams work and play better together. First step as a team leader - develop your EQ.

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Life’s economy is primarily based on collaborative rather than competitive advantage

Life’s economy is primarily based on collaborative rather than competitive advantage | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
If we want to re-design economics based on what we know about life’s strategy to create conditions conducive to life, we need to question some basic assumptions upon which the narrative underlying our current economic systems is built. The narrative of separation has predisposed us to focus on scarcity, competition, and the short-term maximization of individual benefit as the basis on which to create an economic system. Life’s evolutionary story shows that systemic abundance can be unlocked through collaboratively structured symbiotic networks that optimize the whole system so human communities and the rest of life can thrive.
David Hain's insight:

A powerful and persuasive argument to seek collaboration for abundance rather than competition for asset protection!

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Will The United States Remain A World Power? - Altucher Confidential

Why do we need countries at all? They only lead to nationalism, trade wars, immigration problems, dictatorships, corruptions (name me a single government that is not corrupt?).

Facebook has quietly bonded 2 billion people together across their single platform. I talk to people from at least 50 different countries a day across social media.

We once were nomadic tribes of 150 people. Then when we had to protect our wheat so we became villages. Then villages developed specialties and developed into cities. Then cities merged into kingdoms. Then empires. (See the book, “Sapiens” by Yuval Hariri).

The United States is by far the biggest empire ever.

But there will be a next. Evolution of government structures over the past 12,000 years requires that there will be a next. Economics requires that there will be a next. (See the book, “The Evolution of Everything” by Matt Ridley).

Global communication requires that there will be a next. The relatively recent discovery that racial and ethnic differences are much smaller than people believed requires that there will be a next.

The expansion of technologies that will have global footprints (biotech, virtual reality, faster transportation) will tighten the stitches that hold us all together. There will be a Next.

I’m signing up now. I’m a Citizen of Next.
David Hain's insight:

Nomads--> tribes -->villages  --> cities --> countries --> empires. What's next? Power comes partly from community strength - and community is no longer just place...

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The case for optimism as we face a daunting wave of technological change 

The case for optimism as we face a daunting wave of technological change  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

In fact, in this new era, no single organization can go it alone. As a business leader, I’ve always stressed the importance of putting partnership first. You’ll succeed if you build a strong ecosystem of partners that allows you to focus on what your organization does best.
We are just at the beginning of discovering what’s possible in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and as global leaders, it’s our responsibility to steer the world through the challenges and opportunities ahead. It will take strong collaboration across the public and private sectors to leverage technology for the greater good, and ensure the Fourth Industrial Revolution puts people first. Leaders who come together across business, government and academia will learn new tools to help their stakeholders thrive and obtain more useful information and insight from the data to make better decisions.
Technology is about opening doors to make new things possible. As the world becomes more connected, we must be proactive and open to new approaches that will help our fundamental institutions shape the way we use technology — not the other way around.

David Hain's insight:

Meg Whitman on the potential of the 4th Industrial Revolution - but only with active collaboration...!

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Why do some teams perform better than others?

Why do some teams perform better than others? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
When reviewing a potential new employee’s CV, there are certain buzzwords such as ‘team player’ which are a prerequisite for any recruiter. But what defines a truly excellent team player, and how do their interactions with other members of the team ensure overall success for the organisation? Culture and chemistry in the workplace are vital to high performance, but are how teams function a result of how team-oriented each individual is, or is there more to it? What are the factors governing one team’s success against another parallel team’s failure?
David Hain's insight:

Useful insights on teams! How is the energy distributed? Collectively or randomly?

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Emerging Future of Organizations, Communities and Humanity!

Emerging Future of Organizations, Communities and Humanity! | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Learn from the changing world and share your change to the macro!
Learn how you can participate your contributive change at the micro!
We change the way we LIVE! We change the way of LIFE!
Thriving in the flow of Life! Ideas for Life! Soul of Life!

For humanity and communities

(self and your immediate environment)

From ME to WE,
from EGO to ECO,
from SILOS to COLLECTIVE CREATIVITY

Connecting the econological shift (following the sequence is essential)

spiritual connected: connection between self and self
social connected: connection between self and others
ecological connected: connection between self and nature
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating new site with many ideas on how we together can make the world a better and more sustainable place. Let's hope it helps to make a difference!

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A Quick Guide to External Collaboration

A Quick Guide to External Collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Working with external partners to bring better products and services to market faster and/or develop better intellectual property has never been more popular in the world of business than what we see today.

The term open innovation is often used to describe this, but this is more like an umbrella term that can be used to cover many different ways of working with external partners including crowdsourcing, challenge-driven innovation, platform innovation or user-driven innovation.

...as well as my favorite terms: external collaboration, networked business structures or networked innovation.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration - what and how. One man's view...

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How Cooperatives Are Driving the New Economy - Evonomics

How Cooperatives Are Driving the New Economy - Evonomics | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A century ago, industrialists like Andrew Carnegie believed that Darwin’s theories justified an economy of vicious competition and inequality. They left us with an ideological legacy that says the corporate economy, in which wealth concentrates in the hands of a few, produces the best for humanity. This was always a distortion of Darwin’s ideas. His 1871 book The Descent of Man argued that the human species had succeeded because of traits like sharing and compassion. “Those communities,” he wrote, “which included the greatest number of the most sympathetic members would flourish best, and rear the greatest number of offspring.” Darwin was no economist, but wealth-sharing and cooperation have always looked more consistent with his observations about human survival than the elitism and hierarchy that dominates contemporary corporate life.

Nearly 150 years later, modern science has verified Darwin’s early insights with direct implications for how we do business in our society. New peer-reviewed research by Michael Tomasello, an American psychologist and co-director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has synthesized three decades of research to develop a comprehensive evolutionary theory of human cooperation. What can we learn about sharing as a result?
David Hain's insight:

Is collaboration the means to survival?

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Circular Economy

Circular Economy | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Transforming to a circular and sharing economy decouples manufacturing, production and consumption systems from natural resource constraints whilst optimizing the utilization of assets and democratizing wealth creation opportunities. In a low growth, low employment world, this offers a model for sustainable growth especially when harnessed to the potential of the 4IR.   

Accelerating this transformation requires a simultaneously “glocal” approach - global multi-stakeholder collaboration for large scale systems change (in finance, technology, supply chains), combined with specific localised systems change (in cities, provinces, countries).
 
By engaging international organisations and multinational businesses at the global level with a group of champion governments, businesses and civil society at the regional/national/subnational level, the project is building a community of purpose to identify and initiate public-private actions that will accelerate this change. The work will manifest in at least 4 regions/countries/provinces around the world, including China (Guangzhou), East Africa (Rwanda), Europe (the Netherlands) Latin America, Japan and the United States.
David Hain's insight:

Projects do exist that aim to challenge the way the world has traditionally worked!

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Globalization has left people behind. This is what we should do about it

Globalization has left people behind. This is what we should do about it | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It’s recently become fashionable to worry that the fabric of democracy is being undermined as people feel left behind by globalization and automation. I think these fears are to some extent well founded. But this isn’t a new problem: it goes back at least as far as the 1980s. Our failure to recognize it then, and act on it since, is why it has now reached crisis proportions.

Are there lessons we could learn from those decades-long failures of policy? Yes. Will we learn them? Perhaps not, although there are a few promising signs.

The most fundamental lesson is that to address a problem, you first need to notice it. One of the striking features of the Brexit vote, and the response in some other places to various manifestations of rising populism, has been the surprise of many voters in wealthy, cosmopolitan cities at discovering how differently some of their fellow citizens are thinking.
David Hain's insight:

We are in danger of exiling whole swathes of the population who don't fit Neo-liberal world views. Some possible solutions here...

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.