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The Tweeting Pope has a lesson for your business | Internet Psychologist | Graham Jones

The Tweeting Pope has a lesson for your business | Internet Psychologist | Graham Jones | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The Pope is more popular than Justin Bieber on Twitter and this popularity has a lesson for anyone running an online business.

Via Get Clients Online, Anne Egros
David Hain's insight:

Wonder if he's on Scoopit yet?

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 7, 2013 3:33 PM

very interesting...

Collaborationweb
People working together to make things better
Curated by David Hain
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Will The United States Remain A World Power? - Altucher Confidential

Why do we need countries at all? They only lead to nationalism, trade wars, immigration problems, dictatorships, corruptions (name me a single government that is not corrupt?).

Facebook has quietly bonded 2 billion people together across their single platform. I talk to people from at least 50 different countries a day across social media.

We once were nomadic tribes of 150 people. Then when we had to protect our wheat so we became villages. Then villages developed specialties and developed into cities. Then cities merged into kingdoms. Then empires. (See the book, “Sapiens” by Yuval Hariri).

The United States is by far the biggest empire ever.

But there will be a next. Evolution of government structures over the past 12,000 years requires that there will be a next. Economics requires that there will be a next. (See the book, “The Evolution of Everything” by Matt Ridley).

Global communication requires that there will be a next. The relatively recent discovery that racial and ethnic differences are much smaller than people believed requires that there will be a next.

The expansion of technologies that will have global footprints (biotech, virtual reality, faster transportation) will tighten the stitches that hold us all together. There will be a Next.

I’m signing up now. I’m a Citizen of Next.
David Hain's insight:

Nomads--> tribes -->villages  --> cities --> countries --> empires. What's next? Power comes partly from community strength - and community is no longer just place...

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The case for optimism as we face a daunting wave of technological change 

The case for optimism as we face a daunting wave of technological change  | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

In fact, in this new era, no single organization can go it alone. As a business leader, I’ve always stressed the importance of putting partnership first. You’ll succeed if you build a strong ecosystem of partners that allows you to focus on what your organization does best.
We are just at the beginning of discovering what’s possible in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and as global leaders, it’s our responsibility to steer the world through the challenges and opportunities ahead. It will take strong collaboration across the public and private sectors to leverage technology for the greater good, and ensure the Fourth Industrial Revolution puts people first. Leaders who come together across business, government and academia will learn new tools to help their stakeholders thrive and obtain more useful information and insight from the data to make better decisions.
Technology is about opening doors to make new things possible. As the world becomes more connected, we must be proactive and open to new approaches that will help our fundamental institutions shape the way we use technology — not the other way around.

David Hain's insight:

Meg Whitman on the potential of the 4th Industrial Revolution - but only with active collaboration...!

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Why do some teams perform better than others?

Why do some teams perform better than others? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
When reviewing a potential new employee’s CV, there are certain buzzwords such as ‘team player’ which are a prerequisite for any recruiter. But what defines a truly excellent team player, and how do their interactions with other members of the team ensure overall success for the organisation? Culture and chemistry in the workplace are vital to high performance, but are how teams function a result of how team-oriented each individual is, or is there more to it? What are the factors governing one team’s success against another parallel team’s failure?
David Hain's insight:

Useful insights on teams! How is the energy distributed? Collectively or randomly?

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Emerging Future of Organizations, Communities and Humanity!

Emerging Future of Organizations, Communities and Humanity! | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Learn from the changing world and share your change to the macro!
Learn how you can participate your contributive change at the micro!
We change the way we LIVE! We change the way of LIFE!
Thriving in the flow of Life! Ideas for Life! Soul of Life!

For humanity and communities

(self and your immediate environment)

From ME to WE,
from EGO to ECO,
from SILOS to COLLECTIVE CREATIVITY

Connecting the econological shift (following the sequence is essential)

spiritual connected: connection between self and self
social connected: connection between self and others
ecological connected: connection between self and nature
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating new site with many ideas on how we together can make the world a better and more sustainable place. Let's hope it helps to make a difference!

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A Quick Guide to External Collaboration

A Quick Guide to External Collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Working with external partners to bring better products and services to market faster and/or develop better intellectual property has never been more popular in the world of business than what we see today.

The term open innovation is often used to describe this, but this is more like an umbrella term that can be used to cover many different ways of working with external partners including crowdsourcing, challenge-driven innovation, platform innovation or user-driven innovation.

...as well as my favorite terms: external collaboration, networked business structures or networked innovation.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration - what and how. One man's view...

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How Cooperatives Are Driving the New Economy - Evonomics

How Cooperatives Are Driving the New Economy - Evonomics | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A century ago, industrialists like Andrew Carnegie believed that Darwin’s theories justified an economy of vicious competition and inequality. They left us with an ideological legacy that says the corporate economy, in which wealth concentrates in the hands of a few, produces the best for humanity. This was always a distortion of Darwin’s ideas. His 1871 book The Descent of Man argued that the human species had succeeded because of traits like sharing and compassion. “Those communities,” he wrote, “which included the greatest number of the most sympathetic members would flourish best, and rear the greatest number of offspring.” Darwin was no economist, but wealth-sharing and cooperation have always looked more consistent with his observations about human survival than the elitism and hierarchy that dominates contemporary corporate life.

Nearly 150 years later, modern science has verified Darwin’s early insights with direct implications for how we do business in our society. New peer-reviewed research by Michael Tomasello, an American psychologist and co-director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has synthesized three decades of research to develop a comprehensive evolutionary theory of human cooperation. What can we learn about sharing as a result?
David Hain's insight:

Is collaboration the means to survival?

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Circular Economy

Circular Economy | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Transforming to a circular and sharing economy decouples manufacturing, production and consumption systems from natural resource constraints whilst optimizing the utilization of assets and democratizing wealth creation opportunities. In a low growth, low employment world, this offers a model for sustainable growth especially when harnessed to the potential of the 4IR.   

Accelerating this transformation requires a simultaneously “glocal” approach - global multi-stakeholder collaboration for large scale systems change (in finance, technology, supply chains), combined with specific localised systems change (in cities, provinces, countries).
 
By engaging international organisations and multinational businesses at the global level with a group of champion governments, businesses and civil society at the regional/national/subnational level, the project is building a community of purpose to identify and initiate public-private actions that will accelerate this change. The work will manifest in at least 4 regions/countries/provinces around the world, including China (Guangzhou), East Africa (Rwanda), Europe (the Netherlands) Latin America, Japan and the United States.
David Hain's insight:

Projects do exist that aim to challenge the way the world has traditionally worked!

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Globalization has left people behind. This is what we should do about it

Globalization has left people behind. This is what we should do about it | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
It’s recently become fashionable to worry that the fabric of democracy is being undermined as people feel left behind by globalization and automation. I think these fears are to some extent well founded. But this isn’t a new problem: it goes back at least as far as the 1980s. Our failure to recognize it then, and act on it since, is why it has now reached crisis proportions.

Are there lessons we could learn from those decades-long failures of policy? Yes. Will we learn them? Perhaps not, although there are a few promising signs.

The most fundamental lesson is that to address a problem, you first need to notice it. One of the striking features of the Brexit vote, and the response in some other places to various manifestations of rising populism, has been the surprise of many voters in wealthy, cosmopolitan cities at discovering how differently some of their fellow citizens are thinking.
David Hain's insight:

We are in danger of exiling whole swathes of the population who don't fit Neo-liberal world views. Some possible solutions here...

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How blockchains could change the world | McKinsey & Company

How blockchains could change the world | McKinsey & Company | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
What impact could the technology behind Bitcoin have? According to Tapscott Group CEO Don Tapscott, blockchains, the technology underpinning the cryptocurrency, could revolutionize the world economy. In this interview with McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland, Tapscott explains how blockchains—an open-source distributed database using state-of-the-art cryptography—may facilitate collaboration and tracking of all kinds of transactions and interactions. Tapscott, coauthor of the new book Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Behind Bitcoin is Changing Money, Business, and the World, also believes the technology could offer genuine privacy protection and “a platform for truth and trust.” An edited and extended transcript of Tapscott’s comments follows.
David Hain's insight:

Blockchain - the engine for a more collaborative (and better) world?

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How To Save Yourself From Collaborative Overload

How To Save Yourself From Collaborative Overload | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Collaboration is great when it effectively and efficiently solves a problem – but not so much when it exhausts your organization’s experts, which often leads to falling productivity and rising turnover. Known as collaborative overload, it can burn out even your brightest workers.

“They are so overtaxed that they’re no longer personally effective,” stated an article co-authored by Rob Cross in Harvard Business Review this year. “And more often than not, the volume and diversity of work they do to benefit others goes unnoticed, because the requests are coming from other units, varied offices, or even multiple companies.”

Cross has been studying how people interact at work for decades. A professor in the management department at University of Virginia’s McIntire School of Commerce, Cross has researched, taught, and consulted on applying social network analysis ideas to critical business issues and co-authored books about social networks. I recently spoke with him about his work.
David Hain's insight:

Do organisations need a Chief Collaboration Officer?

 

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In 2017, Being a 'Lone Genius' Won't Cut It Anymore

In 2017, Being a 'Lone Genius' Won't Cut It Anymore | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Steve Jobs is, in many ways, the prototype for how many innovators see themselves. Brash and headstrong, he had an unfailing commitment to his vision and steamrolled anyone who dared to stand in his way. While he had failures as well as successes, no one can deny that he made a profound impact on the world.

So while researching my upcoming book, Mapping Innovation, I was surprised to find that the vast majority of great innovators I talked to were nothing like Steve Jobs. In fact, rather than ego driven megalomaniacs, I found them to be some of the most helpful and humble people you can possibly imagine.

The notion of a lone genius has always been a myth. As W. Brian Arthur observes in The Nature of Technology, innovations are combinations, so it is unlikely that anyone ever has all the pieces to the puzzle. Even Steve Jobs depended on a small circle of loyalists. Now, because of digital technology, the ability to collaborate is becoming a key competitive advantage.

David Hain's insight:

Another good read on the critical links between innovation and collaboration!

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Innovation is a social process - which means collaboration is key

Innovation is a social process - which means collaboration is key | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Let me assert one thing: innovation isn’t "technology". Innovation is people coming together to solve tough problems in new ways. That is - counter to some understandings - innovation is fundamentally a SOCIAL process, and the next evolution of innovation-driven organisations (whether they’re small businesses, enterprises, or departments within larger companies) will be defined by emphasizing soft skills like emotional intelligence and interpersonal communication as much as traditional, hard skills.

The reason why is simple: the low-hanging fruits are gone. The easy wins have been claimed. The kind of groundbreaking innovations that will create the next Uber, the next tool for repairing DNA, or framework for addressing income inequality can only come from looking at the world from several perspectives at once - engineering, finance, design, marketing, moral, legal, and so forth - and synthesizing them into something that’s greater than the sum of the parts.

The big wins of tomorrow fundamentally require world-class teams operating in perfect lockstep. They’re simply more than any of us can tackle on our own.

David Hain's insight:

Branson on why collaboration is critical to our futures!

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Global migration’s impact and opportunity | McKinsey & Company

Global migration’s impact and opportunity | McKinsey & Company | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Migration is a key feature of our increasingly interconnected world. It has also become a flashpoint for debate in many countries, which underscores the importance of understanding the patterns of global migration and the economic impact that is created when people move across the world’s borders. A new report from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), People on the move: Global migration’s impact and opportunity, aims to fill this need.

Refugees might be the face of migration in the media, but 90 percent of the world’s 247 million migrants have moved across borders voluntarily, usually for economic reasons. Voluntary migration flows are typically gradual, placing less stress on logistics and on the social fabric of destination countries than refugee flows. Most voluntary migrants are working-age adults, a characteristic that helps raise the share of the population that is economically active in destination countries.

By contrast, the remaining 10 percent are refugees and asylum seekers who have fled to another country to escape conflict and persecution. Roughly half of the world’s 24 million refugees are in the Middle East and North Africa, reflecting the dominant pattern of flight to a neighboring country. But the recent surge of arrivals in Europe has focused the developed world’s attention on this issue. A companion report, Europe’s new refugees: A road map for better integration outcomes, examines the challenges and opportunities confronting individual countries.
David Hain's insight:

Support for migration and collaboration are like fish and chips - they sprung from a similar mindset!

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The Myth of the Larger-Than-Life Leader

The Myth of the Larger-Than-Life Leader | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The reverence of Steve Jobs and the narrative of how he founded then resurrected Apple, turning it into one of the most influential companies in the world, is, by now, one of the most famous corporate success stories in our culture. On par with the mythology of Henry Ford and various robber barons, Jobs exemplifies our fascination with the cult of personality, particularly in the business world. Indeed, Jobs was a remarkable businessman. But note that remarkable means not only “worthy of attention” but also “extraordinary, unusual.”

The problem is that in the context of our business culture all too often the focus is on the former definition and not the latter. Of the top 20 Fortune 500 companies today, only one CEO—Berkshire Hathaway’s Warren Buffett—is likely to be a household name. The other companies have arguably achieved their prominence not through the sheer genius of one person but through the collective work and vision of many. And yet corporate boards continue to covet and overvalue “rock star” CEOs, and this mistaken attitude often trickles down through organizational cultures.

The reality, as many professionals who tend to fall more on the quiet end of the spectrum can attest to, is that many of the best workers—be they at the top of the pyramid or somewhere in the middle—go about their business, achieving great results without fanfare. And while it may feel as though the whole world is beguiled by those who make the most noise in conference rooms and boardrooms, it’s encouraging and, critically, worth noting that that’s not actually the case.
David Hain's insight:

Collaborative capacity is more likely than charisma to help you make it big!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, December 19, 2016 4:46 PM
Agree with David Hains Collaborative capacity is key to leadership success
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How to make any collaborative partnership fail | BioSci Consulting

How to make any collaborative partnership fail | BioSci Consulting | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Let’s form a task force’. They cheered as they charged into the night carrying torches ready to solve the challenge before them.
It seems as if forming some sort of collaborative partnership is an automatic, almost required response to a problem. Just even thinking you want to form some sort of collaborative partnership produces a almost unstoppable degree of momentum.
Yet, as humans we are wired for social interaction, so there is always a degree of automatic behaviour that drives the formation and maintenance of collaborative partnerships.
What if you don’t want to collaborate? What if you would prefer to just work on your own?
You could actively engage in making your collaborative partnership fail. If does you can go back to working on your own.
If this is what you want to do here are 7 ways to drive any collaborative partnership into failure:
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration  has a cost, especially if you're trying to do it when it's not needed, or if you screw it up. Some ways that can happen here...!

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A Blueprint for Measuring Health Care Outcomes

The starting point for achieving value in any health care system is to measure outcomes. Although this can present leadership challenges related to shifting strategy, culture and operations, it certainly isn’t rocket science. There are hundreds of provider organizations the world over that have already implemented outcomes measurement, and this number increases every week. Regardless, many providers still believe that measuring outcomes is too difficult to do.

Through regular interaction with our global network of value innovators, we at the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) have developed a 10-step implementation “blueprint” that any provider can follow. Of course, there is no one-size-fits-all solution for measuring outcomes, and all providers must make specific tweaks in order to make it work for them. However, all must take similar steps, traverse similar challenges, and build similar infrastructures to facilitate outcomes measurement.

Here we describe how one of the world leaders in outcomes measurement, Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands, used this blueprint in one of its pediatric surgery departments – for cleft lip and palate. To build a successful measurement program like this one, follow these steps:
David Hain's insight:

Blueprint for how to drive whole system innovation using collaborative methods.

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The beginning of system dynamics | McKinsey & Company

The beginning of system dynamics | McKinsey & Company | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Two threads run through the story of how I came to develop the field of system dynamics. First, everything I have ever done has converged on system dynamics. Second, at many critical moments, when opportunity knocked, I was willing to walk through the open door to what was on the other side.

David Hain's insight:

In respectful memory of a massive innovator in the age of complexity, a classic article about Forrester's system dynamics!

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Reflecting on the power of collaboration

Reflecting on the power of collaboration | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
What is particularly striking across all of the projects considered for these awards is the way in which research and innovation are driven by collaboration. The teams involved in these awards span multiple organisations and bring together a broad set of skills and experiences. They combine a range of disciplinary traditions. They link foundational discovery-led science with engineering practice.

The collaborations involved in these projects allowed research users to shape and drive the key research challenges. Each team involved was very much more than the sum of the parts, establishing new ways of working that allowed the different skills to be combined. The combination of these different traditions and viewpoints often provided the key insights that made each of these projects so successful. Collaboration drives the flow of ideas from the research lab into real world use. These ideas often span multiple sectors with lessons learned in one domain helping shape solutions in another. People and the flow of ideas are the driving forces of innovation, and collaboration is essential for success. These awards represent the best examples of the flow of ideas and the collaboration that underpins it.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration the secret of award winning engineering research. Case studies.

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How To Build A High Performing Team

How To Build A High Performing Team | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In today’s hyperconnected world, business is more like an organism rather than the 20th-century metaphor of the command & control machine. The speed of change occurring in marketplaces requires stakeholders such employees, partners, suppliers, and customers to individually create, co-create and collaborate together to solve problems faster than the competition. Whether making commitments to customers, co-workers, partners, or your boss, they are watching, collaborating, and making judgments. Remember, teamwork begins by building trust.
David Hain's insight:

Using a standard of trust benchmark to ensure collaboration is effective, from @StandardOfTrust.

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These Five Behaviors Can Create an Innovation Culture

These Five Behaviors Can Create an Innovation Culture | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Many companies want to establish a culture of innovation, one that will encourage employees to take risks that lead to breakthrough products. But how exactly to build this type of culture often eludes senior leaders — threatening the success of their innovation initiatives.

Interestingly, it may be that their focus on culture is what’s holding them back. They are thinking about the big picture, instead of instituting the changes that would actually enable that picture to exist. Culture is the net effect of shared behaviors, and therefore adopting innovative behaviors must come first. You change the culture by becoming more innovative — not the other way around.

You change the culture by becoming more innovative — not the other way around.

As Jon Katzenbach has written, companies should focus on changing a few critical behaviors — “a small number of important behaviors that would have great impact if put into practice by a significant number of people.” When it comes to innovation, adopting the following five behaviors can help your organization to make the leap.

David Hain's insight:

Collaboration rightly emphasised as critical, sustainable engine of innovation and culture change!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, December 5, 2016 11:47 PM
I like numbers 1 and 2 in particular
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How To Lead In The Age Of Algorithms

How To Lead In The Age Of Algorithms | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In his book The Seventh Sense, Joshua Cooper Ramo makes the point that we now live in a world where “thick connection is normal” and the mastery of this connection is the essential skill of the age. This is true for everyone, but it is particularly true of our leaders – political, religious, and business.
Not surprisingly, tech companies – and their executives – get it. Uber and Lyft use algorithm “managers” to dispatch drivers, while Waze outperforms my Volvo’s sat nav by predicting the best route based on the real-time and stored driving data of its users.
But, really, business leaders in all industries need to master the network, not in some mid-distant future, but now. We are interacting with algorithms every day, in ways so mundane that we fail to notice (Google, you auto-complete me). And in professions as diverse as medicine, manufacturing, and law, we see viable examples of human-machine teams.
So how does one lead in the age of algorithms? To lead is to master the network. 
This topic deserves – and has already garnered – significant study elsewhere. But for the purposes of exploring at a high level – and frankly, for my personal commitment to my own development – I set out here to address four questions:
Will we need leaders?
What will leaders do?
What skills do they require?
Who will lead?
David Hain's insight:

Capability challenges and training dilemmas for leaders in a world of AI and the rise of the machines. Thought provoking...

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The Era of Outsourcing is Over – Senator Bernie Sanders – Medium

The Era of Outsourcing is Over – Senator Bernie Sanders – Medium | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We need to send a very loud and very clear message to corporate America: the era of outsourcing is over. Instead of offshoring jobs, the time has come for you to start bringing good-paying jobs back to the United States of America.
David Hain's insight:

Bernie calls on Donald to make sure that corporate USA does it bit for job creation. What will be the knock-on effects?

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How the Growth Mindset Can Increase Cooperation

How the Growth Mindset Can Increase Cooperation | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Jewish-Israelis and Palestinian-Israelis have spent decades in conflict over disputed territories. The mutual distrust and skepticism have built to a point that the two groups struggle to work cooperatively on solving their issues.
But a Stanford-led research team of psychologists found that teaching Jewish-Israeli and Palestinian-Israeli teenagers that groups are generally capable of change—without ever mentioning a specific adversary—can significantly improve their ability to cooperate.


Amit Goldenberg, a graduate student working with psychology professors Carol Dweck and James Gross, was lead author on the paper published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, along with co-authors Kinneret Endevelt, Eran Halperin, and Shira Ran of the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya, Israel.
“We found that people who believe societies and individuals are capable of change cooperate much better with each other,” Goldenberg said.

David Hain's insight:

Working on a shared mindset can significantly enhance even the hardest collaborative challenges!

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Look Twice

Look Twice | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Susan T. Fiske has some bad news: Prejudice might be hardwired in our brains. But the good news is that we can still learn to override our prejudices and embrace difference.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration means valuing diversity. So we all need to know about the science of bias!

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Are We Really So Modern?

Are We Really So Modern? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

For all our technological breakthroughs, we’re still wrestling with the same basic questions as the Enlightenment philosophers.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

The big questions are timeless and don't go away. We just need to be sure we keep asking them from time to time...

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 3, 2016 4:06 AM

We like to think of ourselves as living in an age of unprecedented disruption. In reality we are still living with the problems that the Enlightenment philosophers formulated and tried to solve. We are never quite as modern as we think.

 

Arron Saini's comment, November 14, 2016 7:06 AM
Here is the end of all the questions. I found a website which helps us solving all our questions so that we can life a peaceful life : http://www.dadabhagwan.org/
Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.