Collaboration wit...
Follow
Find
628 views | +0 today
 

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

An Inside Look At How Project-Based Learning Actually Works

An Inside Look At How Project-Based Learning Actually Works | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Project-based learning is one of the most popular terms in education innovation today. We talk about PBL all the time and how it, combined with flipped classrooms, can basically change the way education works. It’s an exciting time to be sure.


Via Andrea Zeitz, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

What If Schools Created a Culture of "Do" INSTEAD of a Culture of "Know?"

What If Schools Created a Culture of "Do" INSTEAD of a Culture of "Know?" | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Here at Educon yesterday, I had the chance to learn a bit more about design thinking from David Jakes. David's central point was that schools and teachers often get stuck in a "Yeah, but..." mindset when thinking about change.

 

Of course, we'd have to work to take active steps to redefine almost everything about our schools if a culture of "Do" is really going to be possible. 

 

===> Grading will need to change -- from a focus on content mastery to a focus on demonstration of an ability to apply content in novel situations <===

 


Via Gust MEES, AnnC
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, January 3, 2013 10:26 AM

This is exactly my point of view since > 40 years already where I was a student at that time! BRAVO, I hope to see it be reality one day!

 

255's curator insight, January 7, 2013 4:25 AM

Culture of "know" grow up in the culture of "consulting" ? 

Mercor's curator insight, January 7, 2013 5:15 AM

Rescooped by 255 from 21st Century Learning and Teaching ontoHandling Engineering & Controls

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
This cooperative activity challenges students to reach a group goal by sharing ideas and working together.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Assignments That Promote Critical Thinking | Faculty Focus

Assignments That Promote Critical Thinking | Faculty Focus | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Teaching students to think critically has long been a goal of education. Some, like the authors of the article highlighted here, think it’s a goal whose importance has increased.

Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Raising Young Critical Thinkers in the Digital Age

Raising Young Critical Thinkers in the Digital Age | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Teaching kids how to curate information and discern what's trustworthy from what's bogus is a really important lesson for parents nowadays.

So it’s time to learn the art of curating the terabytes of content humans are bombarded with on a regular basis – it’s a survival skill and one that will provide an incredibly important advantage to kids in schools and the workplace of the future.


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from AdLit
Scoop.it!

Infographic: 10 Principles for Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Infographic: 10 Principles for Effective Vocabulary Instruction | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Vocabulary Strategies That Work: Do This—Not That!
by Lori Wilfong

Packed with engaging, research-based, classroom-ready strategies for teaching vocabulary.


Via Mel Riddile, CTL- VBCPS, Kath Lok, R.Conrath, Ed.D., Cheryl Frose, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Cheryl Frose's curator insight, December 15, 2012 11:29 PM

Things to remember...

SimonFisher's curator insight, September 5, 2013 3:22 PM

How come I haven't found this earlier?

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from AdLit
Scoop.it!

{12 Days: 12 Tools} Infographic: Recap of 12 Tools | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

{12 Days: 12 Tools} Infographic: Recap of 12 Tools | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Via Katie Frank, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Katie Frank's curator insight, December 29, 2012 5:35 PM

A Tool for every day! I love this! Thanks!

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Welcome to mindmapping.com

Welcome to mindmapping.com | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Mindmapping.com provides information on creating mind maps, mind mindmapping software and the theory behind mind mapping.

Via Ken Peterson, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from Banco de Aulas
Scoop.it!

Highly Collaborative Classroom Furniture -- Campus Technology

Highly Collaborative Classroom Furniture -- Campus Technology | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Cutting-edge learning spaces are designed with flexibility and collaboration in mind, right down to the modular tables and chairs.

Via Luciana Viter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

The Autism Paradox

The Autism Paradox | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

A friend recently shared this with me.  Makes me think we need to think of more ways to capitalize on our kids strengths and when they are older make sure we match a job they are passionate about and also one that will build on their gifts.

Here's to others seeing ALL kids as competent!

 

The Autism Paradox


1. It's easy to recite an entire book but difficult to make up a story.


2. It's easy to line up toys but difficult to stay in line.


3. It makes perfect sense to climb on the sofa but little sense to sit on it.


4. Memorizing the Presidents in order - 10 minutes. Packing a school bag - 10 hours.


5. Family pictures on the wall are boring but that speck of dust next to it, now that's fascinating!


6. Talking about weather patterns - a piece of cake. Talking about my day - impossible.


7. Ability to focus on spinning objects - timeless. Ability to focus on homework - 3 seconds.


8. Being called by name - can't hear it. Some owl hooting in the distance - clear as a bell.


9. How to operate the remote control - zero instruction. How to button up pants - intensive instruction.


10. Navigating social rules - poorly skilled. Navigating from the back seat of the car - highly skilled.

 

 

                                       – Charmaine

 


Via Charmaine Thaner, Mary Perfitt-Nelson, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

Achievement Gap Goes Global - Getting Smart by Gary Kaplan - edleaders, edreform

Achievement Gap Goes Global - Getting Smart by Gary Kaplan - edleaders, edreform | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Achievement gap? Which one? It’s not just inner-city schools that need to raise their game.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012 - Forbes

Top 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012 - Forbes | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

ForbesTop 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012ForbesThis is the fourth consecutive year for this list, and 2012 had no shortage of moments that exemplified emotional intelligence (in some cases, a lack of it).


Via Jose Luis Anzizar, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

Why Being a Leader Is Less Stressful than Following | TIME.com

Why Being a Leader Is Less Stressful than Following | TIME.com | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Contrary to the common wisdom that people in positions of power are more stressed than the rest of us, a new study finds that those in higher-ranking roles wield more control and, thus, suffer less stress and anxiety (#Anxiety, #Stress, #Cortisol,...


Via Georgia Feiste, Anne Egros, Bobby Dillard, Jose Luis Anzizar, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

The Best Of Smart Classroom Management 2012 — Smart Classroom Management

The Best Of Smart Classroom Management 2012 — Smart Classroom Management | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Happy New Year! And thanks for being a regular reader of Smart Classroom Management! From the bottom of my heart I want to thank you for your continued support of SCM.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, AnnC
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 1, 2013 1:33 PM

Ooh.  A bevy of resources to get you thinking about how you interact with students.  Nice collection!  

AnnC's curator insight, January 1, 2013 8:47 PM

Read and share much this year!

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

10 Characteristics of Community Leaders

10 Characteristics of Community Leaders | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
In addition to traits of superior leadership in any discipline, such as integrity and responsibility, here are ten characteristics that are particular to excellent community leaders.

Via Gust MEES, AnnC
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, January 6, 2013 4:37 PM

Leadership needs to get adapted on a daily base...

 

Randi Thompson's curator insight, January 6, 2013 7:00 PM

The facts are, any business page you create, in any social media  network, is really the beginning of creating your own community for people to be a part of. Why would they want to join yours?

AnnC's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:12 PM

Walk beside and develop leadership in your community.

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

CriticalThinking.org-Our Mission


The Center for Critical Thinking works under the auspices of the Foundation For Critical Thinking, an educational non-profit organization, to promote essential change in education and society through the cultivation of fairminded critical thinking. 

                               

 Critical thinking is essential if we are to get to the root of our problems and 

develop reasonable solutions. After all, the quality of everything we do is determined by the quality of our thinking.

 

Whereas society commonly promotes values laden with superficial, immediate "benefits," critical thinking cultivates substance and true intellectual discipline. It entails rigorous self-reflection and openmindedness — the keys to significant changes. Critical thinking requires the cultivation of core intellectual virtues such as intellectual humility, perseverance, integrity, and responsibility.

Nothing of real value comes easily.  A rich intellectual environment — alive with curious and determined students — is possible only with critical thinking at the foundation of the educational process.

 read more...


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking From The Ground Up

Critical Thinking From The Ground Up | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Critical Thinking From The Ground Up

====================================================

Gust MEES's insight:

Read also my curation about Critical-Thinking here:

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?q=critical+thinking

====================================================


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, December 14, 2012 6:29 AM

 “Cast your net broadly.  Learn a lot and have confidence in what you know.  Be able to express it, learn from others, and think about it.”

Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from AdLit
Scoop.it!

50 Art Journal Prompts | Blacksburg Belle

50 Art Journal Prompts | Blacksburg Belle | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

50 art journal prompts to help spark your creativity.

 

Because I believe that every artist should have their own art journal to play in, to practice in, and to express their authentic selves, I’ve put together 50 art journal prompts for you to use when you just need to remove yourself from life and let go. You can print this list, put it in your art journal, and use these prompts whenever you want to spark your creativity.


Via Ariana Amorim, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from AdLit
Scoop.it!

9 Grammar Games That Are Really Addicting

9 Grammar Games That Are Really Addicting | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
Online grammar games are a new and painless way to refresh your grammar skills.

Via Cheryl Frose, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
This cooperative activity challenges students to reach a group goal by sharing ideas and working together.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity

Encouraging Cooperation: Card-Tower Activity | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
This cooperative activity challenges students to reach a group goal by sharing ideas and working together.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from Banco de Aulas
Scoop.it!

6 great techniques for getting students to write down their homework

6 great techniques for getting students to write down their homework | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
TweetHomework… now there’s a tricky subject to deal with. Just like you, no doubt, I assign homework to my students with clear goals in mind: to increase their knowledge and to improve their abilit...

Via TeachingEnglish, Luciana Viter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

Why High School Students Drop Out and Efforts to Re-Engage

Why High School Students Drop Out and Efforts to Re-Engage | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

Caralee Johnson Adams has worked as a journalist for nearly 25 years, covering education, health, parenting, and other issues.

 

The reasons:  

 

Absence of parental support or encouragement (23 percent)
Becoming a parent (21 percent)
Lacking the credits needed to graduate (17 percent)
Missing too many days of school (17 percent)
Failing classes (15 percent)
Uninteresting classes (15 percent)
Experiencing a mental illness, such as depression (15 percent)
Having to work to support by family (12 percent)
Was bullied and didn't want to return (12 percent)


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids --

The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids -- | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it
The inverse power of praise....

 

Wonderful article highlighting research done by Carol Dweck out of Columbia (and Stanford) on how we talk to children.  Pros and cons of praise are discussed along with implications.  


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, AnnC
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariel Gomez de la Torre from School Psychology Tech
Scoop.it!

Does it pay to know your type?

Does it pay to know your type? | Collaboration with co-teaching | Scoop.it

In this infographic, you'll get an overview of the 16 types to give a sense of how these bigger-than-life personalities fit in the Myers-Briggs philosophy. The official test is based on Carl Jung’s work in psychological typology.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez, Jose Luis Anzizar, AnnC
more...
Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, April 28, 2013 9:14 AM

Well, the first claim that the unknown writer makes (no by-line attributed), that universities spend "millions of dollars" each year giving this personality test to their students, is just buncomb: a succinct fairly accurate version of Myers-Briggs is online for free, and that's what we ask students to take.  No one pays for the personality indicator except by means of time to take it and internet connectivity.

 

We then ask the students to write reflections of whether this type suits them or not, and what that means in terms of their study habits and needs. So students are not asked to conform to their types, as this article wants its readers to do; they are asked instead to analyze their typology for accuracy and helpfulness in understanding themselves and their type's relationship to their areas of study.

 

As for the "infographic," I've worked with students to analyze, as a survey, the questions and results of Myers-Briggs in argument classes before, and there's no doubt that the questions asked lead to the answers given.  So it's kind of bizzare that someone *ascribed* types to historical figures who never took the test (or if they did, never made their types known) and then show these figures as "typical" of the types.

 

I personally come up with two of my letters always changing back and forth (INTJ?  ENTP? INTP?  ENTJ?).

 

This "article" is misleading and silly.  In fact, I'll bet that many of these people actually did take the Myers-Briggs: the test was invented back in the '20s and '30s by a mother and daughter who wanted the daughter to marry, knowing what the man was really like.  Actually published in 1943, it was a standard psychological tool for many years; anyone who had psycological counseling in the '60s and '70s probably took it. 

 

So these unnamed writers of this article might do well to search archives and see if any of their reported personalities ever actually took the test.

 

But wait -- that would be real journalism.

Sorry.

Sharla Shults's curator insight, April 28, 2013 4:33 PM

Does it pay to know your type? Some say, yes; others say, no. Lot of study and information on personality traits/types. Do they have merit? What do you think?

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 29, 2013 9:53 AM

Great fun, just call me Peter the Great. :)