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Il segreto della cultura umana? Condividere le conoscenze - Le Scienze

Il segreto della cultura umana? Condividere le conoscenze - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Una ricerca ha mostrato chiare e caratteristiche differenze nei modelli di interazione sociale tra bambini, scimpanzé e cebi cappuccini, indicando nella maggiore predisposizione dell'uomo a comportamenti prosociali le basi di quell'apprendimento cumulativo...
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a glimpse on living systems behavior
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The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it

Two great trends are evident in the evolution of life on Earth: towards increasing diversification and towards increasing integration. Diversification has spread living processes across the planet, progressively increasing the range of environments and free energy sources exploited by life. Integration has proceeded through a stepwise process in which living entities at one level are integrated into cooperative groups that become larger-scale entities at the next level, and so on, producing cooperative organizations of increasing scale (for example, cooperative groups of simple cells gave rise to the more complex eukaryote cells, groups of these gave rise to multi-cellular organisms, and cooperative groups of these organisms produced animal societies). The trend towards increasing integration has continued during human evolution with the progressive increase in the scale of human groups and societies. The trends towards increasing diversification and integration are both driven by selection. An understanding of the trajectory and causal drivers of the trends suggests that they are likely to culminate in the emergence of a global entity. This entity would emerge from the integration of the living processes, matter, energy and technology of the planet into a global cooperative organization. Such an integration of the results of previous diversifications would enable the global entity to exploit the widest possible range of resources across the varied circumstances of the planet. This paper demonstrates that it's case for directionality meets the tests and criticisms that have proven fatal to previous claims for directionality in evolution.

 

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization
John E. Stewart

Biosystems
Available online 1 June 2014

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystems.2014.05.006


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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 15, 10:06 PM

Cooperation is the best way to improve, sustain, maintain, and repair.  Competition is what drives everyone and everything towards something different, be it competition for resources or competition against the elements around us.

 

I don't get what the point of competition amongst the species is for.  Part of cooperation, after all, is knowing what works, learning about what could work better or doesn't work, and then letting the negative or sub-optimal slip back beneath the waves of ignorance, such that the new ways can rise to prominence.

 

Change is the only constant in this universe of universes.

 

Yet cooperation, I think, yields the higher and stronger of the universal structures that are out there, even if it means that there are still losers and winners.  The only difference is the level of consent and consensus that's reached within the social, ecological, economical, and/or political landscape.  One way works towards what is best.  The other way simply yields what is best at competing, which is not the same as being the actual best solution to a given problem or condition.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 16, 9:51 AM

is this the end of stove pipes?

Ra's curator insight, June 22, 6:02 AM

Have I been reading too much science fiction?

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Catch Systems Thinking in Action Online | Institute of Play

Catch Systems Thinking in Action Online | Institute of Play | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
This week, at the 23rd annual Systems Thinking in Action conference, leaders of organizations around the world are gathering to learn how to make sense of complexity, shift an organization's culture, and create meaningful ...

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Redefining Collaboration

Redefining Collaboration | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Working together requires information.  Going from information to action is at the center of any good knowledge management process.  Too often, however, operationalizing collaboration concentrates on what could be measured.  In this case its sharing and knowledge management.

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Why it's time to lay the selfish gene to rest – David Dobbs – Aeon

Why it's time to lay the selfish gene to rest – David Dobbs – Aeon | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
The selfish gene is one of the most successful science metaphors ever invented. Unfortunately it’s wrong

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Survey of Corporate Sustainability Executives: Progress on Climate Change Requires Collaboration | 3BL Media

Survey of Corporate Sustainability Executives: Progress on Climate Change Requires Collaboration | 3BL Media | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Survey of Corporate Sustainability Executives: Progress on Climate ... http://t.co/OAGVJS7A6O
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Open innovation et Intelligence collective : des outils pour repenser modèles économiques, produits et services

Open innovation et Intelligence collective : des outils pour repenser modèles économiques, produits et services | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Des termes barbares ? Simplement tendance ? Ou de vrais outils pour les organisations qu'elles soient privées ou publiques ? La pratique me fait dire que

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Philippe Olivier Clement's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:00 AM

Nous vivons une époque où les consommateurs sont intelligents, où les interactions sont possibles, où le relationnel horizontal donne une toute nouvelle perspective à notre façon de travailler. Nous vivons aussi dans un monde fini, où nos ressources doivent être pensées, nos produits et services être durables.


L’ouverture et la collaboration avec ses parties prenantes sont des pas difficiles à faire, mais elles sont fructueuses à chaque fois lorsque le cadre est bien posé et le travail facilité avec intelligence et coeur.

Jean-Francois BAU's curator insight, September 4, 2013 5:00 AM

Un article à lire ....

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The nature of collective intelligence

The nature of collective intelligence | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it

Presentation by Pierre Levy


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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 2, 2013 11:57 AM

45 minute video presentation supported by slides on the nature of collective intelligence and the philosophical and technical construct behind the next level of the internet as a global mind.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:15 PM

Pierre Levy, c´est toujours très intéressant!

Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 18, 2013 2:32 PM

Pierre Lévy invented IEML; think semantic web

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The nature of collective intelligence

Digital data stem from our own personal and social cognitive processes and thus express them in one way or another. But we still don’t have any scientific tools to make sense of the data flows produced by online creative conversations at the scale of the digital medium as a whole.

 

Presentation by Pierre Levy


Via Viktor Markowski, Complexity Digest
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 2, 2013 11:57 AM

45 minute video presentation supported by slides on the nature of collective intelligence and the philosophical and technical construct behind the next level of the internet as a global mind.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:15 PM

Pierre Levy, c´est toujours très intéressant!

Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 18, 2013 2:32 PM

Pierre Lévy invented IEML; think semantic web

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Collaboration is the New Competition

Collaboration is the New Competition | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Five ways to drive large-scale social change by working cooperatively.

Via ddrrnt, Complexity Digest, Complexity Institute
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ddrrnt's curator insight, January 12, 2013 2:19 AM

Leaders and organizations are acknowledging that even their best individual efforts can't stack up against today's complex and interconnected problems. They are putting aside self-interests and collaborating to build a new civic infrastructure to advance their shared objectives. It's called collective impact and it's a growing trend across the country. (...)

While collaboration is certainly not a foreign concept, what we're seeing around the country is the coming together of non-traditional partners, and a willingness to embrace new ways of working together. And, this movement is yielding promising results.

... five lessons for driving large-scale social change through collaboration:


  1. Clearly define what you can do together: As Dana O'Donovan of the Monitor Institute has noted, many organizations find collaboration to be messy and time consuming. From the very beginning, you must develop clarity of purpose and articulate, "What can we do together that we could not do alone?" (...)
  2. Transcend parochialism: Even the most well intended collaboration is often crippled by parochialism. Individual organizations earmark their participation and resources for activities that perfectly align with their own work or they use the collaboration platform as a way to get other participants to fund their own priorities. (...)
  3. Adapt to data: The complex, multidisciplinary problems that many collaborative projects tackle do not have easy fixes. These challenges require continuous learning and innovation and the use of real-time data to help participants understand what is and isn't working. Adjustments must be made on the fly. (...)
  4. Feed the field: You have an obligation to share what you learn — both the results and the methods for achieving them. Living Cities has long understood the value that our member institutions get by learning and working together. (...)
  5. Support the backbone: In our experience, progress is best achieved when a "backbone organization," keeps the group's work moving forward. Staff at these organizations ensure that work is completed between meetings, track data, enable adaptation, disseminate knowledge, and build buy-in and ownership from all participants.(...)

Ben Hecht

Ben Hecht is President & CEO of Living Cities, an organization that harnesses the collective knowledge of its 22 member foundations and financial institutions to benefit low income people and the cities where they live.



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Why Humans Cooperate: A Cultural and Evolutionary Explanation (Evolution and Cognition): Joseph Henrich,Natalie Henrich: 9780195314236: Amazon.com: Books

Why Humans Cooperate: A Cultural and Evolutionary Explanation (Evolution and Cognition)

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Why Humans Cooperate: A Cultural and Evolutionary Explanation (Evolution and Cognition) [Joseph Henrich,Natalie Henrich

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L'origine dell'eusocialità nelle vespe - Le Scienze

L'origine dell'eusocialità nelle vespe - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Le analisi statistiche hanno mostrato che gli schemi di espressione genica delle vespe operaie sono molto più simili a quelli delle fondatrici che a quelli delle regine e delle future regine...
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I comportamenti culturali dei delfini con la spugna - Le Scienze

I comportamenti culturali dei delfini con la spugna - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Un piccolo gruppo di delfini di una popolazione che vive nella Shark Bay, in Australia, ha sviluppato un peculiare metodo di caccia: pulisce il fondo con una spugna per stanare le prede.
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Il pesciolino che impara dai suoi simili - Le Scienze

Il pesciolino che impara dai suoi simili - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Una ricerca suggerisce che lo spinarello nordico, un piccolo pesce che vive nelle avque dell'Europa, possa avere una capacità di "apprendimento sociale" assai sofisticata che si sarebbe evoluta per effetto di una forte pressione selettiva...
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A memory of errors in sensorimotor learning

A memory of errors in sensorimotor learning | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
The current view of motor learning suggests that when we revisit a task, the brain recalls the motor commands it previously learned. In this view, motor memory is a memory of motor commands, acquired through trial-and-error and reinforcement. Here we show that the brain controls how much it is willing to learn from the current error through a principled mechanism that depends on the history of past errors. This suggests that the brain stores a previously unknown form of memory, a memory of errors. A mathematical formulation of this idea provides insights into a host of puzzling experimental data, including savings and meta-learning, demonstrating that when we are better at a motor task, it is partly because the brain recognizes the errors it experienced before.
Complexity Institute's insight:

The learning process is a co-generative modality between the being

and the environment, and try-and-learn modality is the only way to build a coherent meaning from the environment to stay alive.

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Suzana Herculano-Houzel: What is so special about the human brain?

The human brain is puzzling -- it is curiously large given the size of our bodies, uses a tremendous amount of energy for its weight and has a bizarrely dense cerebral cortex. But: why? Neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel puts on her detective's cap and leads us through this mystery. By making "brain soup," she arrives at a startling conclusion.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/suzana_herculano_houzel_what_is_so_special_about_the_human_brain.html ;


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Stanford’s Altruism Research Is Funded by the Dalai Lama

Stanford’s Altruism Research Is Funded by the Dalai Lama | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
We can be healthier, live longer, and make the world a better place by exploring our potential for compassionate behavior, according to neurosurgeon James Doty, founder and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education,...

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D'Aristote au Web de demain : l'intelligence collective selon Pierre Lévy

D'Aristote au Web de demain : l'intelligence collective selon Pierre Lévy | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it

Lorsque l'on s'intéresse à l'Internet, on se rend rapidement compte que ce n'est pas une technologie comme les autres. Pour certains, l'Internet a même une valeur et un potentiel anthropologique.


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Philippe Olivier Clement's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:15 PM

Je pense que l’on va devenir plus intelligent. Comme on va plus loin en voiture qu’à pied, grâce à l’exploitation de l’intelligence collective, on pensera plus loin.


Je crois que l’on va pouvoir faire les choses de manière un peu plus sensée, en prenant la mesure de la diversité et de la complexité.


sarah's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:59 AM

En réalité il y a aussi ceux qui pensent le contraire, que le net rendra les gens plus bètes dû au maigre effort qu´ ils font en attendant que ce soient les autres ceux qui travaillent pour profiter de leur travail et eux, sans s´en soucier de rien,  aux aguets de ces ressources, sans rien faire

d´autre  qu´attendre les résultâts. Si tout le monde fait ça, le net n´est pas la meileure manière de collaborer et de penser.

Mème les enfants , au lieu de voir le potenciel du net, préfèrent jouer, laisser passer le temps et couper et coller quelque chose ,le moment arrivé de l´évaluation de leurs tâches.

Si la tendance de quelques étâts des EEUU se généralise, de ne pas enseigner à écrire à l´école, mais seulement à taper sur le clavier, un jour arrivera où, manque de clavier pour une raison quelconque , ils ne pourront communiquer leurs idées s´ils ont besoin de communiquer quelque chose à autrui. 

C´est comme si au lieu d´essayer de former en peinture un nouveau MIchel Angelo, on voudrait remplir de glogsters la Chapelle Sixtine.

En plus je crois que la maîtrise de l´écriture est un automatisme indispensable pour la maturité de l´enfant et du cerveau qui lui permettra d´ interagir avec le monde  sans aucun intermédiaire  moins direct avec  sa pensée (le clavier).La maitrise du crayon est plus directe, comme une prolongation  automatique de sa main en contact  plus direct avec sa pensée:

 

 http://circo89-sens2.ac-dijon.fr/IMG/pdf/apprendre_a_ecrire.pdf

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Collaboration is Key to Creating an Engaged Culture of Sustainability | 3BL Media

Collaboration is Key to Creating an Engaged Culture of Sustainability | 3BL Media | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Collaboration is Key to Creating an Engaged Culture of ... - 3BL Media http://t.co/SAyQSBSni5
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The Collaborative Organization by Jacob Morgan

The Collaborative Organization by Jacob Morgan | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Jacob Morgan is principal at The Chess Media Group and has been a very active promoter of Collaborative Software for the last few years. I had the opportunity to meet him at a party at the Enterpri...
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Le management collaboratif par L’intelligence collective source de performance et de motivation

Le management collaboratif par L’intelligence collective source de performance et de motivation | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Dans de nombreuses industries, l’intelligence collective est aujourd’hui au cœur du succès d’une entreprise, car elle est non seulement le meilleur moyen de générer des solutions aux problèmes complexes grâce, elle permet aussi d’embarquer un grand...

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Louis Levy's curator insight, March 16, 2013 5:30 AM

Quelle photo superbe !

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Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups

During consensus decision making, individuals in groups balance personal information (based on their own past experiences) with social information (based on the behavior of other individuals), allowing the group to reach a single collective choice. Previous studies of consensus decision making processes have focused on the informational aspects of behavioral choice, assuming that individuals make choices based solely on their likelihood of being beneficial (e.g., rewarded). However, decisions by both humans and nonhuman animals systematically violate such expectations. Furthermore, the typical experimental paradigm of assessing binary decisions, those between two mutually exclusive options, confounds two aspects common to most group decisions: minimizing uncertainty (through the use of personal and social information) and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). Here we experimentally disassociate cohesion-based decisions from information-based decisions using a three-choice paradigm and demonstrate that both factors are crucial to understanding the collective decision making of schooling fish. 

 

Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups
Noam Miller, Simon Garnier, Andrew T. Hartnett, and Iain D. Couzin

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1217513110
PNAS February 25, 2013 201217513


Via Complexity Digest, Eugene Ch'ng
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Le api riconoscono i volti - Le Scienze

Le api riconoscono i volti - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Le api sono in grado di imparare a riconoscere la struttura generale di un volto...
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Vespe fisionomiste: quella faccia (di vespa) la conosco - Le Scienze

Vespe fisionomiste: quella faccia (di vespa) la conosco - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Alcune vespe sociali hanno evoluto la capacità di riconoscersi tra loro in modo indipendente ma molto simile a quella degli esseri umani.
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Anche gli animali hanno dubbi - Le Scienze

Anche gli animali hanno dubbi - Le Scienze | Collaboration or Competition? | Scoop.it
Scimmie e delfini sono in grado di rendersi conto di non sapere qualcosa, un sofisticato processo di pensiero chiamato metacognizione...
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