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Twenty Creative Ways to Check for Understanding - Brilliant or Insane

Twenty Creative Ways to Check for Understanding - Brilliant or Insane | collaboration | Scoop.it
Test drive these twenty tried and true strategies to check for understanding in the classroom. Which ones will serve your students best?
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Should teachers be evaluated on how ‘gritty’ their students are?

Should teachers be evaluated on how ‘gritty’ their students are? | collaboration | Scoop.it
MacArthur “genius” fellow argues that there are major flaws in the ways we measure children’s character traits.
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Five ways teachers can improve student feedback

Five ways teachers can improve student feedback | collaboration | Scoop.it
A lot of evidence has pointed to the significant positive impact of feedback on student learning and performance over the last 10 years. Many schools have placed great emphasis on tackling how teac...
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Being a Growth Mindset Facilitator

Being a Growth Mindset Facilitator | collaboration | Scoop.it
I was asked recently why I have a strong interest and innate understanding of the growth mindset. I believe it comes from a background of being an adventure educator, and even though it was not lab...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 13, 11:01 PM

Jackie Gerstein shares her thoughts on what beliefs a growth mindset facilitator will have. From my experience we seem to have a growing number of learners whom may struggle with growth mindset. As an educator you may find some suggestions that you could incorporate into your classroom.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 14, 6:55 AM

Hmmmmm!

Lorraine Danton's curator insight, April 20, 5:00 PM

Students can grow--we need to be there to gently push them past their limits with the the understanding that there will be failure and it is okay.

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How To Teach Visual Thinking – 5 Strategies From Around The Web

How To Teach Visual Thinking – 5 Strategies From Around The Web | collaboration | Scoop.it

"The misconceptions about visual thinking are alarming. On one hand, this critical skill seems integral for contemporary learning, since almost every modern input is visual in nature. Yet this key proficiency seems almost entirely absent from state standards and daily classroom lessons."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 7, 5:53 AM

What is visual thinking? How can we teach visual thinking to our learners? ASIDE has an excellent post that provides five presentations that explore visual thinking from different perspectives. All of them share information on the "the power of visuals to craft a layered approach toward teaching with creative design." The five presentations (all from slideshare) are:

* Visual Thinking Presentation

* Visual Thinking and the Writing Process

* Visual Thinking for Brainstorming, Planning, Learning, Collaborating, Harvesting

* An Introduction to Visual Thinking

* Visual Thinking Help us to...

Each of these presentations provides a different viewpoint. Many of our learners are visual learners today. This post will provide you with great resources to help them hone the skill of visual thinking (and will also help you).

Michael Patrick Dunn's curator insight, April 7, 4:24 PM

Sketch notaking is just one way!

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, April 9, 7:01 PM

Thx Beth Dichter

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40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies

40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies | collaboration | Scoop.it

"You can’t watch a video like you read a book; the modalities couldn’t be much different."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 2, 11:03 PM

We know that students are now seeing videos as components of online testing. Most students know strategies to use when reading text, but what works best with videos? This post provides 40 comprehension strategies that you may want to teach in your classroom.

The post begins with a short exploration of text and videos and then explores the interaction between video and text. The comprehension strategies are divided into four sections (information below quoted from the text):

* Before viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

* During viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

* After viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

Each of these sections has ten questions that provide anchor strategies. For example, the first section (before viewing) includes Anchor Strategies: Viewing Purpose, Preview, Predict, Connect
Click through to the post to learn more.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 5, 8:38 AM

If you are able to use Video in class, these are some things yoiui should think about.

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 28, 12:34 PM

It is important to help students understand how to get the most out of video viewing.

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Data: They're Not Just for Spreadsheets Anymore

Data: They're Not Just for Spreadsheets Anymore | collaboration | Scoop.it
Use your cellphone camera and a sketchbook to capture data about your students that numbers can't reveal.
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Shoot Your Data: 5 Kinds of Photos That Reveal More Than Numbers - Brilliant or Insane

Photos uncover evidence that quantitative data do not reveal. Learn how to take 5 kinds of photos that reveal more than numbers.
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4-Components of the Theory of Action Infographic

4-Components of the Theory of Action Infographic | collaboration | Scoop.it
The Theory of Action Infographic by Carol Ehrlich …

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 25, 10:45 AM

This infographic is one resource found at this site, which also provides a detailed planning guide for Deeper Learning. Click through to the site and you will find a section on:

* The DL Learning Guide which provides a series of exercises and a set of resources that demonstrate how you can create conditions necessary for Deeper Learning.

* The User Guide an overview and framework. You will also find a Table of Contents.

* You can access each phase from this section or you can move to the  section called DL Phases.

   Phase 1 helps you Establish a Vision for Students.

   Phase 2 focuses on Understanding and Assessing the Conditions for Deeper Learning.

   Phase 3 guides you on Planning for Deeper Learning.

   Phase 4 is on Monitoring Your Plan for Deeper Learning.

If your district or school is considering Deeper Learning this is a great resource to share, or to create a focus group to explore the concept and decide if it is the right time for your building.

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Helping Students Fail: A Framework

Helping Students Fail: A Framework | collaboration | Scoop.it

"As teachers, allowing students to see failure as a negative experience is one of the worst things we can do.

Granted, this isn’t unique to education. The idea of risk-taking, failing, looking, leaping, try-try-again is ingrained in our cultural DNA. But in education, we certainly have made it dramatic. In fact, we don’t even need the whole word anymore. Failure erodes to fail, which itself erodes to simply F..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 5, 5:46 PM

In education we many students are told they have "failed" yet as teachers we know that making mistakes is the norm. Engineers look at failures as a way to learn. What can we do in education?

This post explores:

* What does it mean to "fail"?

* The role of failure in learning

* Helping Students Fail: A Framework which has four sections, each of which provides "the idea" and guiding questions.

Where can you start as a teacher?

* By clarifying the meaning

* By providing context

* By designing transparent processes

* By illuminating progress

Students need to learn that a "failure" is not the end of the road, but a stop on a journey. As teachers this post provides a number of suggestions that may help us better meet the needs of our students and help them see failure in a different light.

Art Lang's curator insight, February 5, 8:56 PM

Do you think helping students fail will facilitate better learning?

luc taesch's curator insight, February 7, 6:14 AM
failing is earning.
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The 5 Best Interactive Infographics For 2015

The 5 Best Interactive Infographics For 2015 | collaboration | Scoop.it

"...far too few students today are being properly schooled in the skill of curation. Curation is a key proficiency in face of today's instantaneous access to information. Sifting through a sea of sources and aggregating the most relevant research are critical expertises in the world of big data. Alan November actually recommends that on the very first day of school, teachers should train children in proper online searching.
In this vein, we have curated five fascinating interactives to help inspire learners for the year ahead."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 11, 10:20 PM

ASIDE has just published a post that shares five interactive infographics that look at history, geography, sociology and globalization. They are:

* The Infographic History of the World

* In Charted Waters - Mapping a Brave New World

* Manifest Destiny - The Story of the U.S. Told in 141 Maps

* The Story of All of Us - The Age of Exploration

* The Kid's Aren't All Right

If you click through to the post you will find a paragraph that discussed each of these interactive infographics as well as additional links that provide information on how to teach with interactive infographics.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, January 12, 4:21 AM

Each January, the folks from Lake Superior State University (LSSU) release their (vaguely snarky) list of Words Banished from the Queen's English for Mis-Use, Over-Use, and General Uselessness. This year, the term "curated" was put on the chopping block for being, as one commenter noted, a "pretentious way of saying 'selected.'"

Even though Pinterest and One Kings Lane may have catapulted "curated" into popular jargon, we respectfully disagree with the lexicographers at LSSU. Rather than being over-used or hackneyed, far too few students today are being properly schooled in the skill of curation. Curation is a key proficiency in face of today's instantaneous access to information. Sifting through a sea of sources and aggregating the most relevant research are critical expertises in the world of big data. Alan November actually recommends that on the very first day of school, teachers should train children in proper online searching.

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3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com

3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com | collaboration | Scoop.it

"What if you could design questions that engage students at this level in your classroom? What if you could do so without the burden of having to make the subject matter relevant or relatable to every single student?

The secret to writing good questions or problems may surprise you. The key, according to Willingham, is to pose questions or problems that can be solved. That means questions or problems that are not too hard and not too easy, but just right. Think Goldilocks."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 10, 9:06 AM

How do you teach students to write good questions (or how to ask good questions)? This post suggests that good questions have to be at the right level of difficulty and provides three tips that will help you and your students learn how to write good questions (and I suspect how to ask them as well).

What are the three tips?

1. Shore up the students' prior knowledge

2. Lighten students' cognitive load

3. Un-situate students' learning

Each of these tips is described in more detail int he post and some additional links are also provided.

Teaching students how to question, either in writing or verbally, is a critical skill and this post provides some great ideas on ways to help students with the cognitive load so they are supported in the process. You might also want to check out the post Socrative Smackdown which has students learn discussion strategies, some of which are helpful with questions (and that is geared to students in grades 6 - 12).

Andrew Blanco's curator insight, February 5, 10:57 AM

how to respond to great questions

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Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The Need to Document Learning

Teachers as Technology Trailblazers: The Need to Document Learning | collaboration | Scoop.it

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How to use SOLE in your school - Innovate My School

How to use SOLE in your school - Innovate My School | collaboration | Scoop.it
Just what is a self-organised learning environment, and how can it help teachers? School In The Cloud’s Sally Rix explains how the idea changed her career tremendously.
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30 Tips to Cultivate Soft Skills in Your Students

30 Tips to Cultivate Soft Skills in Your Students | collaboration | Scoop.it

"Preparing students for successful careers is a major part of every educator's job, but most preservice and professional development programmes don't cover the skills employers are currently seeking - things like 'emergent' leadership, adaptability, humility and ownership."

Illustration above by Linda Tieu.


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 2, 5:29 PM

We so often hear of the 21st century skills our learners need? Common Core tells us that learners need to be critical thinkers/problem solvers, communicators, collaborators and creators. What skills are employers looking for? More than just the four Cs.

This post by InformEd provides background based on what employers say they need as well as 30 tips to teach soft skills. Four tips (quoted) are below.

* Demonstrate alternate paths to content mastery.

* Start grading students on how well they listen to their peers.

* Assign group exercises that give people the opportunity to speak, listen, write, organize and lead.

* Design opportunities for students to build and demonstrate resilience.

There are many more tips in this post. Click through to learn more.

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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | collaboration | Scoop.it

"Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 15, 11:05 PM

How do you teach your learners to ask good questions? This post shares many resources to help you learn new skills that will assist you in teaching others.

The post begins with a visual, the Teach Thought Learning Taxonomy, which is a template for critical thinking that looks at cognition across six categories. This is described in depth.

Additional tools shared include:

* Socratic Discussion which includes a video from Tch (the Teaching Channel)

* Paideia Seminar - "an integrated literacy event built around formal whole class dialogue. The purpose for doing Paideia Seminar is to support students’ ability to think conceptually and communicate collaboratively." There is also a video.

* The Question Game (which was shared previously on this Scoop.it)

* Bloom's Taxonomy

* Question Formation Technique - See the visual at the top, or check out their website at The Right Question Institute. If this is of interest to you they are presenting a workshop in Boston in July. Information on this is available at their website.

* Universal Question Stems and Basic Question Stem Examples

This is actually part 2 of a two part post. The first post is A Guide to Questioning in the Classroom.

Mike Clare's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

Great starting point.  

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 17, 7:31 AM

SOME TIMES KNOWING THE RIGHT QUESTION TO ASK WILL GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR THE PROBLEM YOU ARE TRYING TO SOLVE!!  IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT TO ASK YOU MAY NOT GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR YEARS BUT THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION THAT WAS ASKED!?!

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Instruction That Sticks: The Right Questions

Instruction That Sticks: The Right Questions | collaboration | Scoop.it

"Julie Grimm, a teacher at Salem Avenue Elementary School in Hagerstown, Maryland, was concerned that many of her 2nd grade students failed to become engaged in their research projects. She found herself spending lots of time trying to provide the right research framework...

Then Julie made one simple shift that disrupted her typical classroom practice and led to a more dynamic learning environment."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 29, 10:41 PM

Learn about the power of question formulation in this post. The information comes from the Right Question Institute, and provides a great overview of how to teach your students to ask good questions. The post is split into the following sections:

* The Power of Question Formulation

* Question Formulation in Practice (which includes)

   - Step 1: The teacher designs a question focus

   - Step 2: Students produce questions

   - Step 3: Students work with open-ended and close-ended questions

   - Step 4: Students prioritize questions

   - Step 5: Teacher and students discuss next steps for using the questions

   - Step 6: Students reflect

* A Catalyst for Deeper Learning

* A Small but Significant Shift

There are also some examples of the question formulation technique from classroom teachers.

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The Creativity Mindset

The Creativity Mindset | collaboration | Scoop.it
I absolutely love all of the emphasis on mindsets these days. There are growth mindsets (which I discuss in The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Staff Workshop) and maker mindsets (which I discuss...

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 20, 9:05 PM

Philosophers such as Gadamer have written about Bildung which incorporates these characteristics as projects of self-renewal.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 21, 11:26 AM
Thanks, Beth Dichter. I find the mindsets very understandable and appealing, much like the science habits of mind.
SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, April 6, 11:48 AM

We must stop educating students out of their creativity and foster an environment that celebrates the creative genius of the students entrusted to our care.

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Deepening Our Relationship with Reflection: Prompts for Writers

Deepening Our Relationship with Reflection: Prompts for Writers | collaboration | Scoop.it
Help writers deepen their relationship with reflection with these prompts.
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8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset"

8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset" | collaboration | Scoop.it
Recently I explored the notion of the “Innovator’s Mindset”, and have thought a lot about this idea.  As I look to write on the topic of “Leading Innovative Change” within schools, we are looking t...
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3 Simple Strategies to Develop Students' Critical Thinking

3 Simple Strategies to Develop Students' Critical Thinking | collaboration | Scoop.it

This week we’ve focused on critical thinking using the model developed by the Foundation for Critical Thinking. By now you’re probably excited about the incredible potential that these tools hold…and a little overwhelmed. Where to start...


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 9, 8:27 AM

Teaching student to think...we know this is not as easy as it sounds. This post suggests looking at this through the lens of the visual displayed above (which comes from The Foundation for Critical Thinking) and recommends that you use three simple steps (quoted from post):

1) TELL students that you want them to work on their thinking.

2) Choose ONE element of thought, intellectual standard, or intellectual trait and teach students what it means.

3) Give students something to think about and ask them to practice improving their thinking.  

Each of these ideas are discussed in the post and suggestions are provided to help you implement this in the classroom.

On Feb. 4, 2015 I posted an article "The Question Game: A Playful Way to Teach Students to Think" and a number of people have responded to it. This post provides some additional ways to teach students to think and many of them are playful also. If one of your goals in teaching is to help students gain this skill take the time to read this post.

Charles Fischer's curator insight, February 11, 7:56 AM

A few great ideas for critical thinking. I particularly liked the activity called "telephone" (not the listening game). Teachers can use all the strategies they can to help their students think better!

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27 Ideas to Encourage Intrinsic Motivation in Your Students

27 Ideas to Encourage Intrinsic Motivation in Your Students | collaboration | Scoop.it

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The Secret to Raising Smart Kids

The Secret to Raising Smart Kids | collaboration | Scoop.it
HINT: Don't tell your kids that they are. More than three decades of research shows that a focus on “process”—not on intelligence or ability—is key to success in school and in life

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 11, 7:07 PM

From the source herself, Dr. Carol Dweck.

Chris Carter's comment, January 11, 9:29 PM
Luciana, thank you for sharing this piece form the coiner of the term, "growth mindset." It is all about the work that kids do, not genetic predispositions.
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7 Ways to Help Quiet Students Find Their Voices in Class

7 Ways to Help Quiet Students Find Their Voices in Class | collaboration | Scoop.it
The students who talk the most are often the ones learning the most, says Cossondra George, but it can be hard to get everyone to speak up. Here are her tricks for getting quiet students to raise their voices.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 10, 11:35 PM

Sometimes quiet students are simply processing. Their insights and contributions are vital in order add depth to the kids who first throw out their hands, because research tells us that the first kids to respond often have half-formed or weak arguments. The quiet kids add depth and challenge the early hand raisers to think more deeply.

Chris Carter's comment, January 11, 6:12 AM
Thank you for sharing, Bonnie. I teach international students, predominantly Asian, who tend toward thh quiet side. So many students contribute impressive depth and reflection to the class when they begin to speak.