Cognitive Neuroscience
4.7K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
onto Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Distinguishing Brain From Mind

Distinguishing Brain From Mind | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
In coming years, neuroscience will answer questions we don't even yet know to ask. Sometimes, though, focus on the brain is misleading.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

aptly said: "While the scans are dazzling and the technology an unqualified marvel, we can always keep our bearings by remembering that the brain and the mind are two different frameworks."

more...
No comment yet.
Cognitive Neuroscience
The study of brain in all its complexity
Curated by Sandeep Gautam
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

UCLA scientists use ultrasound to jump-start a man’s brain after coma

UCLA scientists use ultrasound to jump-start a man’s brain after coma | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
A 25-year-old man made remarkable progress following a treatment at UCLA that uses sonic stimulation to excite the neurons in the thalamus.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:
something to look forward to, though needs replication!
more...
Scott Timmins's curator insight, September 8, 7:26 AM
something to look forward to, though needs replication!
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain?

Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain? | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists compared the neurological impacts of different types of exercise in rats: running, weight training and high-intensity interval training.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:
Confirms my hunch that those who pump weights are less brainier overall:-)
more...
Create Wise Leader's curator insight, March 21, 10:30 AM
Confirms my hunch that those who pump weights are less brainier overall:-)
Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 22, 2:35 AM
Confirms my hunch that those who pump weights are less brainier overall:-)
John Parkinson's curator insight, September 8, 1:32 PM

The study suggests that 'stress' prevents the potential benefits from exercise. In their study the weight training and high intensity training produced more physical/physiological stress than the running condition.

 

If we define stress as 'uncontrollable aversive stimulation' then it is not a surprising finding.  Whether weight training and HIT also produce increased physiological challenge in humans is not necessarily universally true and probably depends on an individual's approach. Nevertheless, a primary message we can take from this is to balance how much stress your training is having on your body... and always remember to keep smiling...

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Blood exerts a powerful influence on the brain

Blood exerts a powerful influence on the brain | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Instead of just responding to the energy needs of neurons, the blood can have a direct and powerful influence on the brain.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Interesting...more active neurons cause expanded/enriched  blood vessels !

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Brain activity is as unique – and identifying – as a fingerprint

Brain activity is as unique – and identifying – as a fingerprint | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it

is as unique as fingerprijntnTypically, researchers pool a bunch of brain scans to figure out the average way brains handle certain tasks. Instead, could they pick out individual brain profiles from a stack of 126 people's scans?

Sandeep Gautam's insight:

More on the 'brain activity is as unique as a fingerprint' study from on e of the authors herself. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Brain Proptips
Scoop.it!

Activin Promotes Robust Axonal Regeneration in Brain-Injured Mice - Brain Protips

Activin Promotes Robust Axonal Regeneration in Brain-Injured Mice - Brain Protips | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
A blog about nootropics and the relentless (sometimes foolish) pursuit of cognitive enhancement.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Oliver Sacks Dies at 82; Neurologist and Author Explored the Brain’s Quirks

Oliver Sacks Dies at 82; Neurologist and Author Explored the Brain’s Quirks | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Dr. Sacks explored some of the brain’s strangest pathways in best-selling case histories like “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat,” achieving a level of renown rare among scientists.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

RP Oliver Sacks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

How To Read Someone's Emotions With 90% Accuracy - PsyBlog

How To Read Someone's Emotions With 90% Accuracy - PsyBlog | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
How neuroscientists are learning to predict emotions with increasing accuracy.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Brain scan used to determine emotional state.

more...
Haiden Jacob-Byrd's curator insight, September 21, 2:46 PM

Computer scans can get a 90% accurate reading of emotions using neuro signatures.

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Scientists Demonstrate Animal Mind-Melds

Scientists Demonstrate Animal Mind-Melds | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
New studies say rats and monkeys whose brains are linked by electrodes can coordinate their brains to carry out tasks, often better than individuals do.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Wiring brains together. 

more...
FastTFriend's curator insight, July 14, 2015 9:35 AM

"If a brain network were to commit a crime, for example, who exactly would be guilty?"

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Exclusive: Oliver Sacks, Antonio Damasio and Others Debate Christof Koch on the Nature of Consciousness

Exclusive: Oliver Sacks, Antonio Damasio and Others Debate Christof Koch on the Nature of Consciousness | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
A few neurologists and brain scientists are proposing that the secret underlying all conscious activity must lie with the way cells respond to stimuli they receive from their environment. In a response to this suggestion, Christof Koch asserts that much more is required for a full theory of consciousness
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

I am on Koch's side!

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Troy Oakes
Scoop.it!

What Is the Link Between the Brain and the Immune System?

What Is the Link Between the Brain and the Immune System? | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
There has been a recent discovery that may lead to a complete revision of biology textbooks. It has been found that there is a link between the brain and the immune system. Scientists have discovered vessels of the lymphatic system that run through the sinuses, which were previously unidentified
more...
Haiden Jacob-Byrd's curator insight, September 21, 2:37 PM

Studies show there is a link between the brain and immune system. Otis the lymphatic system and it changes they way people view the brain and immune system.

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Researchers identify brain signaling linked to 'cooties' and 'crush' phenomenons in children

Researchers identify brain signaling linked to 'cooties' and 'crush' phenomenons in children | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified increased activity in the amygdala brain region at time points when children experience the 'cooties' or 'crush' phenomenons.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

amygdala as significance detector!

more...
Lisa Carey's curator insight, June 30, 2015 8:12 PM

Amygdala amazing

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

What I Learned Writing A Brain Blog For 17 Months | WIRED

What I Learned Writing A Brain Blog For 17 Months | WIRED | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Brain myths die hard, and other things I learned from writing WIRED's popular Brain Watch blog for 17 months.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

The allure of neuroscience images and other learnings.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

The trouble with tDCS? Electrical brain stimulation may not work after all

The trouble with tDCS? Electrical brain stimulation may not work after all | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

some healthy skepticism about tDCS

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Chocolate makes you smarter, study suggests

Chocolate makes you smarter, study suggests | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
People who eat chocolate at least once a week see their memory and abstract
thinking improve, researchers say
Sandeep Gautam's insight:
another reason to savor chocolates!
more...
Jaydin Nies's curator insight, September 19, 11:36 AM

Eat some chocolate, it will help you remember! Studies show that those who eat chocolate have a better memory amongst plenty of other things. 

Thérèse SCHUBETZER's curator insight, September 26, 6:18 AM
Quel apport des neurosciences !
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

To Better Cope With Stress, Listen to Your Body

To Better Cope With Stress, Listen to Your Body | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
To handle stress and adversity more effectively, we should probably pay closer attention to what is happening inside our bodies, according to a fascinating new brain study.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

neural correlates of resilience as body awareness? and to increase resilience, do mindfulness meditation?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

What is consciousness? - YouTube

Understanding what consciousness is, and why and how it evolved, is perhaps the greatest mystery known to science. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://eco...
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

decent intro video on the subject.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Scientists Can Now Predict Intelligence From Brain Activity

Scientists Can Now Predict Intelligence From Brain Activity | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Science fiction is one step closer to reality.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

brain activity using fMRI scans (connectome in this case) used to predict abstract reasoning.

more...
Madison Totushek's curator insight, October 13, 2015 4:34 PM

I chose this article because I am really interested in how the brain works and this article went into depth as to how scientists can predict intelligence from brain activity. They concluded that the more certain regions, such as parietal and frontal lobes, of the brain are talking to each other, the inferences you are making are being processed much more quickly. The only problem with this experiment was the fact that the brain scans were only captured at one moment, they do not explain how the process of these connections are formed. It also does not explain fluid intelligence which is a very important factor in determining people's overall intelligence. 

Rescooped by Sandeep Gautam from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Neuroscientists Find New Brain Network

Neuroscientists Find New Brain Network | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Humans abound with remarkable skills: we write novels, build bridges, compose symphonies, and even navigate Boston traffic. But despite our mental prowess, we share a surprising deficit: our working memory can track only four items at one time.

 

“Would you buy a computer with a RAM capacity of 4?” asks David Somers, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences. “Not 4 MB or GB or 4K—just 4. So how the heck do humans do all this stuff?”

 

“There’s so much information out there, and our brains are very limited in what we’re able to process,” adds Samantha Michalka, a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Computational Neuroscience & Neural Technology. “We desperately need attention to function in the world.”

 

Michalka is lead author and Somers is senior author of a new study that sheds light on this enduring mystery of neuroscience: how humans achieve so much with such limited attention. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the work identifies a previously unknown attention network in the brain. It also reveals that our working memory for space and time can recruit our extraordinary visual and auditory processing networks when needed. The research appeared on August 19, 2015, in the journal Neuron.

 

Prior to this work, scientists believed that visual information from the eyes and auditory information from the ears merged before reaching the frontal lobes, where abstract thought occurs. The team of BU scientists, which also included Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory Director Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, performed functional MRI experiments to test the conventional wisdom. The experiments revealed that what was thought to be one large attention network in the frontal lobe is actually two interleaved attention networks, one supporting vision and one supporting hearing. “So instead of talking about a single attention network,” says Somers, “we now need to talk about a visual attention network and an auditory attention network that work together.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

an auditory attention network along with a visual attention network!

more...
Nicole Wynne's comment, September 9, 2015 8:08 PM
I found this article rather interesting and reading how the vision and auditory systems work together. It also talks about how the auditory systems are dominate in some situations and vice versa. This article provides us with a picture of the brain and where these new found brain networks are. I would recommend this to someone who enjoys learning how the brain works and how it affects us.
Madison Carson's comment, September 16, 2015 11:59 PM
I found this article interesting because of the way humans can think about different things at one time but only have 4 functions. We don't really fully understand how our brains work but they are very complex. Maybe this study will help uplater on in the future
Scott Timmins's curator insight, September 8, 7:29 AM

an auditory attention network along with a visual attention network!

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

First almost fully-formed human brain grown in lab, researchers claim

First almost fully-formed human brain grown in lab, researchers claim | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Research team say tiny brain could be used to test drugs and study diseases, but scientific peers urge caution as data on breakthrough kept under wraps
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

some hyperbole, but a definite advancement!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Human Brain Unique

What Makes a Human Brain Unique | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Experiment compares the way monkey and human brains respond to abstract information
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

its the inferior frontal gyrus!

more...
Haiden Jacob-Byrd's curator insight, September 21, 2:42 PM

Humans have something special about them and that is that they can regognize patterns and then go an extra step further and analys those patters, which when tested monkey brains don't do.

Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

It’s Not a ‘Stream’ of Consciousness

It’s Not a ‘Stream’ of Consciousness | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
It’s more like a rhythm.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

the 'rhythm' of consciousness as a new metaphor!

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Brain Proptips
Scoop.it!

Don’t overthink it: is excess neural activity deleterious?

Don’t overthink it: is excess neural activity deleterious? | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
It has long been suspected that neural hyperactivity might be linked to Alzheimer's pathology. PET imaging studies [1] have revealed that amyloid deposits appear first in the default mode network (...
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

overuse causing Alzheimer's?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

When Does Consciousness Begin and End? — NOVA Next | PBS

When Does Consciousness Begin and End? — NOVA Next | PBS | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
By studying different states of awareness, we’re narrowing in on what it means to be conscious.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

consciousness is being both awake and aware! 

more...
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Promise of deep-brain stimulation for depression encourages research into other mental illnesses

Promise of deep-brain stimulation for depression encourages research into other mental illnesses | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
A procedure that treats depression by using electrodes implanted deep in the brain won’t be available to the public soon, says the researcher who pioneered the procedure more than a decade ago with a team at the University of Toronto.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

the utility of DBS

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sandeep Gautam
Scoop.it!

Five things Alice in Wonderland reveals about the brain

Five things Alice in Wonderland reveals about the brain | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Lewis Carroll’s popular tales contain some hidden truths about the human brain. David Robson takes a leap down the rabbit hole.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Love the neuroscientist insights of Alice in wonderland!

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 25, 2015 3:43 PM

There are links which will take some exploring in reading and reflecting upon this interesting article.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Miguel Herrera E.'s curator insight, February 26, 2015 11:22 AM

5 revelaciones sobre el cerebro en "Alicia en el País de las Maravillas" de L. Carrol: Micropsias y macropsias, los múltiples cambios de forma,( metamorfosis), relaciones en el significado de las palabras,  memoria para anticipaciones ("recuerdos del futuro") y pensar en lo imposible. Los Boys scouts creo que afirman: "Imposible es aquello que se logra después"