Cognitive Neuroscience
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Students should learn second language to prevent dementia in later life

Students should learn second language to prevent dementia in later life | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers claim languages should be a requirement for any kind of degree as bilingualism
could protect the brain in later life
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What Does Mindfulness Meditation Do to Your Brain?

What Does Mindfulness Meditation Do to Your Brain? | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"...MRI scans show that after an eight-week course of mindfulness practice, the brain’s “fight or flight” center, the amygdala, appears to shrink. This primal region of the brain, associated with fear and emotion, is involved in the initiation of the body’s response to stress.

As the amygdala shrinks, the pre-frontal cortex – associated with higher order brain functions such as awareness, concentration and decision-making – becomes thicker.

The “functional connectivity” between these regions – i.e. how often they are activated together – also changes. The connection between the amygdala and the rest of the brain gets weaker, while the connections between areas associated with attention and concentration get stronger..."

 

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Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, December 16, 2014 4:13 AM

How good is this???  We can actually change the anatomical structure of our brain simply by meditating mindfully.  Just image what our world would be like if everyone followed this simple prescription!

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Wholesome Intentions - The Neurology of Intention - Dr. Rick Hanson

Wholesome Intentions - The Neurology of Intention - Dr. Rick Hanson | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Wholesome Intentions – The Neurology of Intention. posted on: March 14th, 2014. Wholesome Intentions - The Neurology of .... Brain Science and Psychotherapy: What's the Next Step? Psychotherapy Networker Symposium, Washington, DC.
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Neurology and Semantics | Psychology and Psychotherapy Articles

Neurology and Semantics | Psychology and Psychotherapy Articles | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
by Robert DePaolo Abstract A previous article by this writer on brain function involved a discussion of how learning occurs in the acquisition phase, i.e..
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Creativity, Madness and Drugs - Scientific American (blog)

Creativity, Madness and Drugs - Scientific American (blog) | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Creativity, Madness and Drugs Scientific American (blog) An internationally recognized authority on neuron-glia interactions, brain development, and the cellular mechanisms of memory, Douglas Fields serves on the editorial board of several...
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How to Build a Better Learner - Scientific American

How to Build a Better Learner - Scientific American | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Brain studies suggest new ways to improve reading, writing and arithmetic—and even social skills
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How Do I Know When I Am Lying to Myself?

How Do I Know When I Am Lying to Myself? | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"...The most important way to determine whether you are lying or not is to observe yourself, without judgment or evaluation. Just notice and start asking questions that can reveal your internal motivations. As you do this, focus on three areas:
 

1. Notice Your Emotion. Generally, if we are emotionally reactive to something or someone, it is because we are being reminded of something painful, raw, or unresolved in our lives. In these areas, we are going to struggle to admit the truth. For example, if you struggle with trust issues in your romantic relationships, you may feel anxious, angry, or scared when falling in love with a new mate. As this occurs, you may find yourself reactive to your mate in ways that are not warranted based on who this person is! In fact, your reaction is fundamentally based on who you are and unresolved issues from your past that you are bringing into your new relationship.


Given this reality, when you have a strong emotional reaction to something or someone, pause. Ask yourself:  What is this emotion? What is my emotion in reaction to? Is my emotion really related to the present situation or is the present situation triggering something in me that is unresolved baggage from my past?..."

 

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Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, June 4, 2014 8:31 PM

Raw fact, when we see or feel something about someone else, there is always the strong possibility that what we see or feel is actually about us and not the other person.  What does this mean when we fall in love with someone?  Are we in love with that other or is it merely that we fall in love with a part of ourselves?  What do you think??  Have your say.....

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How You Prove Yourself Right | Kare Anderson

How You Prove Yourself Right | Kare Anderson | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Do you believe you can become more talented if you work at it, or are you stuck with "just" your innate abilities? This is vital to consider, because it affects so much of what you attempt to do (or not). For example, think about something...
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Dan Siegel - Mindfulness, Psychotherapy and the Brain | iThou.org

Dan Siegel - Mindfulness, Psychotherapy and the Brain | iThou.org | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it

In this article the principles of an interdisciplinary approach to psychotherapy called “interpersonal neurobiology” will be summarized with an emphasis on neuroscience findings regarding the mirror neuron system and neural plasticity. Interpersonal neurobiology is a “consilient” approach that examines independent fields of knowing to find the common principles that emerge to paint a picture of the “larger whole” of human experience and development. Interpersonal neurobiology attempts to extract the wisdom from over a dozen different disciplines of science to weave a picture of human experience and the process of change across the lifespan.

The perspective of “interpersonal neurobiology” is to build a model within which the objective domains of science and the subjective domains of human knowing can find a common home. An interpersonal neurobiology approach to psychotherapy draws on the basic framework of this interdisciplinary view in exploring the ways in which one individual can help others alleviate suffering and move toward well-being. The central idea of interpersonal neurobiology is to offer a definition of the mind and of mental well-being that can be used by a wide range of professionals concerned with human development.


Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Monitoring the mind: clues for a link between meta cognition and self ...

Monitoring the mind: clues for a link between meta cognition and self ... | Cognitive Neuroscience | Scoop.it
One important influence on making sure that we can stay on target to achieve our goals is the capacity for meta-cognition, or the ability to accurately assess our own cognitive experience. ...
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