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Neuroscience: why do we see faces in everyday objects?

Neuroscience: why do we see faces in everyday objects? | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it

 excellFrom Virgin Mary in a slice of toast to the appearance of a screaming face in a man’s testicles, David Robson explains why the brain constructs these illusions


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Gerald Carey's curator insight, August 3, 2014 11:34 PM

An excellent article about the phenomenon of pareidolia.

There are a number of really good images which show it clearly and it reviews some experiments designed to see what happens in the brain when exposed to examples of this.

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Areas of the brain process read and heard language differently

Areas of the brain process read and heard language differently | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it
The brain processes read and heard language differently. Researchers have been able to determine the affected areas of the brain using speech processing tests with the aid of functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT).

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, March 8, 2014 5:27 PM

I'm not sure that this is news but it looks like good evidence for the idea.  As the article suggests, it is also important for brain surgery.

Original article is here: 

Kathrin Kollndorfer, Julia Furtner, Jacqueline Krajnik, Daniela Prayer, Veronika Schöpf. Attention shifts the language network reflecting paradigm presentation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2013; 7 DOI:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00809
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Blue Light Can Improve Alertness and Attention Day or Night — PsyBlog

Blue Light Can Improve Alertness and Attention Day or Night — PsyBlog | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it
Exposure to blue light can improve reaction times, attention and boost brain waves, according to a new study.

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 15, 2014 6:15 PM

As the author states: "those who’d been exposed to blue light had faster auditory reaction times, better attention and their brain wave patterns suggested they were more alert–although they didn’t consciously feel any more alert."

So remove those red lights outside your house and put in blue bulbs instead. :-)

Elise Thygesen's curator insight, February 17, 2014 12:13 AM

Interesting thoughts on augmenting attention!

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Why your children don't listen to you

Why your children don't listen to you | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it

It is an experience as familiar as it is frustrating to many parents and teachers - getting children to pay attention to simple instructions while they are engrossed in watching television, playing a game or reading a book.


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Gerald Carey's curator insight, May 29, 2014 8:37 AM

Good summary of our understanding of inattention blindness.

Prof. Wiseman adds some explanation for why it occurs.

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Your face says it all? Not so fast

Your face says it all? Not so fast | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it
New research calls into question the very foundations of emotion science. It's a con­cept that had become uni­ver­sally under­stood: humans expe­ri­ence six basic emotions -- happiness, sad­ness, anger, fear, dis­gust, and surprise -- and use the same set of facial move­ments to express them. What's more, we can rec­og­nize emo­tions on another's face, whether that person hails from Boston or Borneo. The only problem with this con­cept, according to new research, is that it isn't true at all. Researchers have found that even basic human emotions are in fact not universally perceived.

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Interesting research that could affect the way we communicate with people.

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, March 6, 2014 4:23 PM

Woah - scandal! One of the basic tenets of emotional psychology isn't necessarily true!  Well that's different...

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Phantom Melodies Yield Real Clues to Brain’s Workings

Phantom Melodies Yield Real Clues to Brain’s Workings | Cognitive Fitness and Brain Health | Scoop.it
Studying the brain of a woman who hallucinates piano melodies may help researchers understand how the mind make sense of the world.

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Fascinating!

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:50 PM

This is something I haven't heard off - music hallucinations. The music is quite vivid but heard in the head of the sufferer.  It can be damped down whilst listening to other music. This is the basis of this study.

Sandy Spencer's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:46 PM

A fascinating article for sure!