Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience
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Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience
Some brain basis of cognitive and behavioural functions
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Early motor skills may affect language development

Early motor skills may affect language development | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Learning to sit up, crawl and walk are all major milestones in a child's early development – and parents often record these actions in baby diaries, photographs and videos. Developing motor skills allows the child to become more independent. But our research, backing a number of other studies, has ...
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Brain scans of jazz musicians unveil language and music similarities

Brain scans of jazz musicians unveil language and music similarities | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
By scanning the brains of improvising jazz musicians, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found that the brain interprets music and language in a similar way.
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Why You Need Both Sides Of Your Brain For THIS

Why You Need Both Sides Of Your Brain For THIS | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Humans need both sides of their brain for speech, according to a study Wednesday that could rewrite therapy for people verbally impaired by a stroke.
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Babies don't learn to develop speech - they are born with it

Babies don't learn to develop speech - they are born with it | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Scientists at Northeastern University in Boston studied brain reactions of newborn babies who listened to 'good' and 'bad' sounds and found they reacted in the same way as adults.
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UCSF study shows how the brain sorts sound to make language

UCSF study shows how the brain sorts sound to make language | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Scientists at UCSF have uncovered some tantalizing clues into the complex process of how the brain hears and interprets human voices, and transforms an influx of meaningless sounds into language. The UCSF team, which also included linguists from UC Berkeley, found that when patients listened to random sentences read out loud, their brains quickly and with great precision sorted the sounds based on very clear criteria. "When we hear sounds or language, our brain is actually organizing this information through very particular filters - neurons that are detecting certain sounds," said Dr. Edward Chang, a UCSF neurosurgeon and lead scientist of the brain research. With language in particular, humans are bombarded by sounds and the brain must instantaneously sort out what's meaningful from what's not, and then collect and process the important data into familiar words and sentences. The research is a "beautiful example" of the kind of discoveries scientists can make by taking electrical recordings directly from the brain, said Dr. Josef Parvizi, a Stanford neurologist who has done similar work on patients with epilepsy. Over the past five or so years, scientists have been using patients undergoing these procedures to study other brain activity. Since the patients are already exposing their brains for therapeutic purposes, and since they're going to be stuck in a hospital for several days with not much to do, they make rare but ideal subjects for real-time studies of the brain.
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Neuroscientists find Broca's area is really two subunits, each with its own function

Neuroscientists find Broca's area is really two subunits, each with its own function | Cognitive Psychology. Cognitive and behavioural Neuroscience | Scoop.it
A century and a half ago, French physician Pierre Paul Broca found that patients with damage to part of the brain's frontal lobe were unable to speak more than a few words.
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