cognition
Follow
Find tag "thinking"
7.3K views | +1 today
cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
Curated by FastTFriend
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American

Your Thoughts Can Release Abilities beyond Normal Limits: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Better vision, stronger muscles—expectations can have surprising effects, research finds
FastTFriend's insight:

Expecting to know the answers made people more likely to get the answers right.     

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Warm Weather Makes It Hard to Think Straight: Scientific American

Warm Weather Makes It Hard to Think Straight: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
How temperature shapes difficult decisions
FastTFriend's insight:

 Recent research suggests that warm weather impairs our ability to make complex decisions—and even causes us to shy away from making these decisions in the first place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American

Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is a teachable skill best taught outside the K–12 classroom
FastTFriend's insight:

Museums and other institutions of informal learning may be better suited to teach this skill than elementary and secondary schools. At the Exploratorium in San Francisco, we recently studied how learning to ask good questions can affect the quality of people's scientific inquiry. We found that when we taught participants to ask “What if?” and “How can?” questions that nobody present would know the answer to and that would spark exploration, they engaged in better inquiry at the next exhibit—asking more questions, performing more experiments and making better interpretations of their results. Specifically, their questions became more comprehensive at the new exhibit. Rather than merely asking about something they wanted to try (“What happens when you block out a magnet?”), they tended to include both cause and effect in their question (“What if we pull this one magnet out and see if the other ones move by the same amount?”). Asking juicy questions appears to be a transferable skill for deepening collaborative inquiry into the science content found in exhibits.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Brains & Things
Scoop.it!

Does Speaking in a Second Language Make You Think More, or Feel Less?

Does Speaking in a Second Language Make You Think More, or Feel Less? | cognition | Scoop.it

For all of our capacity for rational, analytical thought, we can have different feelings about the same thing—even make different decisions about it—depending on the language used to talk about it.


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Rexi44
more...
No comment yet.