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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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Eco - Papers: Beware of the Fallout: Umberto Eco and the Making of the Model Reader

FastTFriend's insight:

What is strange or impossible about this particular encyclopedia is not the propinquity of the things listed, but the site on which their propinquity would be possible; that system which organizes the elements yet which itself is not part of the grid. Where could animals that are “frenzied,” “innumerable,” and “drawn with a very fine camelhair brush” ever meet, except in “the immaterial sound of the voice pronouncing their enumeration, or on the page transcribing it? Where else could they by juxtaposed except in the non-place of language?”

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Language boosts invisible objects into visual awareness

New research suggests that language can both enhance and diminish the sensitivity of of vision

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The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein famously said that, "the limits of my language mean the limits of my world," meaning that we can only understand the world through the language we use, and that if our language does not include words for some particular idea or concept, then that concept cannot exist for us. The relationship between language and thought is complex, which researchers continue to debate. Some, like Wittgenstein, argue that thought is dependent on language. Others point out that thought can occur in the absence of language, deaf people being an important case in point.

These arguments focus on the relationship between language and so-called "higher order" thought processes – our ability to evaluate and analyze, to conceptualize and understand. What about lower-order brain mechanisms, such as perception? New research provides evidence that language can influence these processes, so that hearing the name of an otherwise invisible object can enhance visual perception, boosting that object into our conscious awareness.


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Wildcat2030's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:45 AM

go read..

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:43 PM

The question involves the scales and boundaries of places..

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The Psychology of Everything

The Psychology of Everything | cognition | Scoop.it

Give Paul Bloom one hour, and he’ll teach you “the psychology of everything,” illustrating some of the most fundamental elements of human nature through case studies about compassion, racism, and sex.
He discusses some of the biggest questions in the nature versus nurture debate, including “Are we hard-wired to care about others?”
Bloom points out why stereotyping can be both detrimental and beneficial, and he even explains what the porn preference of monkeys tells us about our own sexual choosiness, or lack thereof.
After the hour is up you’ll understand why Bloom calls psychology, because of its cross-disciplinary nature, “the perfect liberal arts major.”

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Dreaming in Different Tongues

Dreaming in Different Tongues | cognition | Scoop.it
Does your language shape how you think and dream? Since there is no evidence that any language forbids its speakers to think anything, we must look in an entirely different direction to discover how our mother tongue really does shape our experience of the world.
Some 50 years ago, the renowned linguist Roman Jakobson pointed out a crucial fact about differences between languages in a pithy maxim: Languages differ essentially in what they must convey and not in what they may convey.
This maxim offers us the key to unlocking the real force of the mother tongue: if different languages influence our minds in different ways, this is not because of what our language allows us to think but rather because of what it habitually obliges us to think about.
The area where the most striking evidence for the influence of language on thought has come to light is the language of space – how we describe the orientation of the world around us.
In what other ways might the language we speak influence our experience of the world? Recently, it has been demonstrated in a series of ingenious experiments that we even perceive colors through the lens of our mother tongue
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Synchronized virtual reality heartbeat triggers out-of-body experiences

Synchronized virtual reality heartbeat triggers out-of-body experiences | cognition | Scoop.it
New research demonstrates that it could be easy to trick the mind and trigger an out-of-body experience by getting a person to watch a video of themselves w...
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On Borges, Particles and the Paradox of the Perceived

How can science, philosophy and a work of pure imagination meet to deepen our understanding of the physical world?

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In 1927 a young German physicist published a paper that would turn the scientific world on its head. Until that time, classical physics had assumed that when a particle’s position and velocity were known, its future trajectory could be calculated. Werner Heisenberg demonstrated that this condition was actually impossible: we cannot know with precision both a particle’s location and its velocity, and the more precisely we know the one, the less we can know the other. Five years later he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for having laid the foundations of quantum physics.

This discovery has all the hallmarks of a modern scientific breakthrough; so it may be surprising to learn that the uncertainty principle was intuited by Heisenberg’s contemporary, the Argentine poet and fiction writer Jorge Luis Borges, and predicted by philosophers centuries and even millenniums before him.

While Borges did not comment on the revolution in physics that was occurring during his lifetime, he was obsessively concerned with paradoxes, and in particular those of the Greek philosopher Zeno. As he wrote in one of his essays: “Let us admit what all the idealists admit: the hallucinatory character of the world. Let us do what no idealist has done: let us look for unrealities that confirm that character. We will find them, I believe, in the antinomies of Kant and in the dialectic of Zeno.”


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Alfred Korzybski - Historical Note on the Structural Differential

Alfred Korzybski talks about his famous model called the Structural Differential, which describes the human abstracting process. Edited by Steve Stockdale.
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