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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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Your Liver May Be "Eating" Your Brain: Scientific American

Your Liver May Be "Eating" Your Brain: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
New research shows the liver and hippocampus (the memory center in the brain) share a craving for the same protein, and the liver wins out when there's extra belly fat involved
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Forgetting Is Harder for Older Brains: Scientific American

Forgetting Is Harder for Older Brains: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Adults hang on to useless information, which impedes learning
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More dramatically, their brains could barely weaken their synapses, a process that allows the loss of useless information in favor of more recent data.

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Arjen ten Have's curator insight, June 12, 2013 5:43 AM

There is two interesting aspect to this. The fact that learning can be hampered by ehm yeah well, learning and of course that this is a clue about the heuristics of memory storage in human brains.

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A Single Brain Cell Stores a Single Concept: Scientific American

A Single Brain Cell Stores a Single Concept: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Each concept—each person or thing in our everyday experience—may have a set of corresponding neurons assigned to it
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For decades neuroscientists have debated how memories are stored. That debate continues today, with competing theories—one of which suggests that single neurons hold the recollection, say, of your grandmother or of a famous movie star.The alternative theory asserts that each memory is distributed across many millions of neurons. A number of recent experiments during brain surgeries provide evidence that relatively small sets of neurons in specific regions are involved with the encoding of memories.
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How Long Will a Lie Last? New Study Finds That False Memories Linger for Years | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

How Long Will a Lie Last? New Study Finds That False Memories Linger for Years | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | cognition | Scoop.it

True memories fade and false ones appear.

The advantage of neuroscience is being able to look under the hood and see the mechanisms that actually create the thoughts and the behaviors that create and perpetuate conflict. Seems like it ought to be useful. That's the question that I'm asking myself right now, can science in general, or neuroscience in particular, be used to understand what drives conflict, what prevents reconciliation, why some interventions work for some people some of the time, and how to make and evaluate better ones.

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They never forget: The strange gift of perfect memory - health - 20 August 2012 - New Scientist

They never forget: The strange gift of perfect memory - health - 20 August 2012 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it

Some people can recall what happened on almost every day of their lives. Unlocking their secrets could shed light on the way all our memories work

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Why does the human brain create false memories?

Why does the human brain create false memories? | cognition | Scoop.it
Our memories constantly adapt and mould themselves to fit the world, but why do our brains generate false recollections?
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"I've been studying memory for more than a decade, and I still find it incredible that our imagination can trick us into thinking we've done something we've never really done and lead us to create such compelling, illusory memories" 

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PLOS ONE: Episodic Memory and Appetite Regulation in Humans

PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
FastTFriend's insight:

Psychological and neurobiological evidence implicates hippocampal-dependent memory processes in the control of hunger and food intake. In humans, these have been revealed in the hyperphagia that is associated with amnesia. However, it remains unclear whether ‘memory for recent eating’ plays a significant role in neurologically intact humans. In this study we isolated the extent to which memory for a recently consumed meal influences hunger and fullness over a three-hour period. Before lunch, half of our volunteers were shown 300 ml of soup and half were shown 500 ml. Orthogonal to this, half consumed 300 ml and half consumed 500 ml. This process yielded four separate groups (25 volunteers in each). Independent manipulation of the ‘actual’ and ‘perceived’ soup portion was achieved using a computer-controlled peristaltic pump. This was designed to either refill or draw soup from a soup bowl in a covert manner. Immediately after lunch, self-reported hunger was influenced by the actual and not the perceived amount of soup consumed. However, two and three hours after meal termination this pattern was reversed - hunger was predicted by the perceived amount and not the actual amount. Participants who thought they had consumed the larger 500-ml portion reported significantly less hunger. This was also associated with an increase in the ‘expected satiation’ of the soup 24-hours later. For the first time, this manipulation exposes the independent and important contribution of memory processes to satiety. Opportunities exist to capitalise on this finding to reduce energy intake in humans.

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As I Get Older, Why Does My Memory for Names Seem to Deteriorate?: Scientific American

As I Get Older, Why Does My Memory for Names Seem to Deteriorate?: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it

Vivid, accurate memory is actually a hard trick to pull off for the human brain.

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The ultimate guide to memory - New Scientist

We are all collections of memories. They dictate how we think, act and make decisions, and even define our identity.

Yet memory, with its many virtues and flaws, has puzzled for centuries. How are memories made and stored in the brain? Why do we remember some events but not others? What do other animals remember? And how can we improve the flawed instrument handed to us by evolution?

In these articles we answer these questions and many more, starting with a revolutionary new understanding of memory’s purpose.

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