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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
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Writing In The 21st Century | Edge.org

Writing In The 21st Century | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

The question I'm currently asking myself is how our scientific understanding of language can be put into practice to improve the way that we communicate anything, including science?

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Ken Schneider's curator insight, June 11, 10:33 PM

Attention fellow language geeks; if you haven't read any Stephen Pinker your geek-dom is in doubt.

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Eco - Papers: Beware of the Fallout: Umberto Eco and the Making of the Model Reader

FastTFriend's insight:

What is strange or impossible about this particular encyclopedia is not the propinquity of the things listed, but the site on which their propinquity would be possible; that system which organizes the elements yet which itself is not part of the grid. Where could animals that are “frenzied,” “innumerable,” and “drawn with a very fine camelhair brush” ever meet, except in “the immaterial sound of the voice pronouncing their enumeration, or on the page transcribing it? Where else could they by juxtaposed except in the non-place of language?”

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Anthony Quinton on Ludwig Wittgenstein: Section 2

Bryan Magee talks with Anthony Quinton about the two incommensurable views of Wittgenstein: his logical view of language and his somewhat pragmatic view of l...
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FastTFriend's comment, August 31, 2013 5:14 AM
delightful allusions (well, in this reader's mind) to China Mieville's Embassytown
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Steven Pinker on Metaphor and the Mind

Steven Pinker on Metaphor and the Mind | cognition | Scoop.it

I think that metaphor really is a key to explaining thought and language. The human mind comes equipped with an ability to penetrate the cladding of sensory appearance and discern the abstract construction underneath - not always on demand, and not infallibly, but often enough and insightfully enough to shape the human condition. 

Our powers of analogy allow us to apply ancient neural structures to newfound subject matter, to discover hidden laws and systems in nature, and not least, to amplify the expressive power of language itself.


Via Mariana Soffer
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Mariana Soffer's curator insight, July 10, 2013 7:42 PM
 Steven Pinker, Canadian-American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist and linguist, cited in Mariana Soffer, Metaphor and the Mind, Sing your own lullaby (via amiquote) 
carol s. (caravan café)'s comment, August 18, 2013 1:37 PM
toile de http://www.robertpokorny.com/robertpokorny/Home.html
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Where nature and nurture clash: Pioneering a new theory of language

Where nature and nurture clash: Pioneering a new theory of language | cognition | Scoop.it
BY DANIEL L. EVERETT



In the wake of Newtown, Americans must be asking themselves: Is there something inherently violent about us? Are we doomed by our nature or our culture to endure ongoing, r
FastTFriend's insight:

confronting "biology made me do it" world view:



We certainly are all cut from the same biological mode. But nature made us flexible not rigid. That is why the bold idea of Chomsky and the evolutionary psychologists simply cannot explain what we know about human diversity. 

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FastTFriend's comment, June 17, 2013 9:27 AM
Human reasoning is the core of human flexibility. And it is this flexibility, not hard-wiring, that is the truly distinctive advantage and characteristic of human beings.
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John Searle on Ludwig Wittgenstein: Section 1

Bryan Magee talks to John Searle about the legacy of Ludwig Wittgenstein; ranging from his early work, the Tractatus, to his posthumously published, Philosophical Investigations.

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Joshua Foer: John Quijada and Ithkuil, the Language He Invented

Joshua Foer: John Quijada and Ithkuil, the Language He Invented | cognition | Scoop.it
Quijada, a fifty-four-year-old former employee of the California D.M.V., spent three decades inventing Ithkuil, an artificial language which is both maximally precise and maximally concise.
FastTFriend's insight:

It wasn’t long after he released his manuscript on the Internet that a small community of language enthusiasts began to recognize what Quijada, a civil servant without an advanced degree, had accomplished. Ithkuil, one Web site declared, “is a monument to human ingenuity and design.” It may be the most complete realization of a quixotic dream that has entranced philosophers for centuries: the creation of a more perfect language.

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danijel drnić's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:54 PM

..So ... there are people that can simply be left as they guide you through the amazing world of fantasy adventure with no end and the beginning, in fact I've been thinking about a new letter odosno symbols that zamijenjivali complete dictionaries and actually serve the same need, at the level of communication the entire planet Earth. Always welcome the innovative and creative people.

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ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org

ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

I'm interested in how the languages we speak shape the way we think. The reason I got interested in this question is that languages differ from one another so much. There are about 7,000 languages around the world, and each one differs from the next in innumerable ways. Obviously, languages have different words, but they also require very different things from their speakers grammatically.

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What Will Come After Language?

What Will Come After Language? | cognition | Scoop.it
h+ Magazine is a new publication that covers technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings in fundamental ways.
FastTFriend's insight:

I’m going to talk a bit about language, and how it relates to mind and reality … and about what may come AFTER language as we know it, when mind and reality change dramatically due to radical technological advances.

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Reasoning Is Sharper in a Foreign Language: Scientific American

Reasoning Is Sharper in a Foreign Language: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
We might be least rational about money in our native tongues...

 

“When people use a foreign language, their decisions tend to be less biased, more analytic, more systematic, because the foreign language provides psychological distance,”

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The Future of Consciousness Part 1 of 7

An address delivered at an Institute of General Semantics symposium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, April 23, 2005...
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Dreaming in Different Tongues

Dreaming in Different Tongues | cognition | Scoop.it
Does your language shape how you think and dream? Since there is no evidence that any language forbids its speakers to think anything, we must look in an entirely different direction to discover how our mother tongue really does shape our experience of the world.
Some 50 years ago, the renowned linguist Roman Jakobson pointed out a crucial fact about differences between languages in a pithy maxim: Languages differ essentially in what they must convey and not in what they may convey.
This maxim offers us the key to unlocking the real force of the mother tongue: if different languages influence our minds in different ways, this is not because of what our language allows us to think but rather because of what it habitually obliges us to think about.
The area where the most striking evidence for the influence of language on thought has come to light is the language of space – how we describe the orientation of the world around us.
In what other ways might the language we speak influence our experience of the world? Recently, it has been demonstrated in a series of ingenious experiments that we even perceive colors through the lens of our mother tongue
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Does Speaking in a Second Language Make You Think More, or Feel Less?

Does Speaking in a Second Language Make You Think More, or Feel Less? | cognition | Scoop.it

For all of our capacity for rational, analytical thought, we can have different feelings about the same thing—even make different decisions about it—depending on the language used to talk about it.


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Rexi44
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25 Romantic Words That Don't Exist in English But Should

25 Romantic Words That Don't Exist in English But Should | cognition | Scoop.it
Because the world needs a name to call someone who has had sex with someone you've already had sex with. (It's buksvåger.)
FastTFriend's insight:

There is a word for it (whatever that 'it' is)...

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Knowledge is a Polyglot: The Future of Global Language | Big Think TV | Big Think

Knowledge is a Polyglot: The Future of Global Language | Big Think TV | Big Think | cognition | Scoop.it
Consider how much more beautiful and authentic and sophisticated and accurate our world would become if we could appreciate the key terminologies of all cultures.
FastTFriend's insight:

"is it really ethical, scientific or even legal to translate Chinese terminologies into European words?"

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Language boosts invisible objects into visual awareness

New research suggests that language can both enhance and diminish the sensitivity of of vision

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The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein famously said that, "the limits of my language mean the limits of my world," meaning that we can only understand the world through the language we use, and that if our language does not include words for some particular idea or concept, then that concept cannot exist for us. The relationship between language and thought is complex, which researchers continue to debate. Some, like Wittgenstein, argue that thought is dependent on language. Others point out that thought can occur in the absence of language, deaf people being an important case in point.

These arguments focus on the relationship between language and so-called "higher order" thought processes – our ability to evaluate and analyze, to conceptualize and understand. What about lower-order brain mechanisms, such as perception? New research provides evidence that language can influence these processes, so that hearing the name of an otherwise invisible object can enhance visual perception, boosting that object into our conscious awareness.


Via Wildcat2030
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Wildcat2030's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:45 AM

go read..

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:43 PM

The question involves the scales and boundaries of places..

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Margalit Fox, "The Riddle of the Labyrinth" | Talks At Google

Margalit Fox, "The Riddle of the Labyrinth" | Talks At Google | cognition | Scoop.it
THE RIDDLE OF THE LABYRINTH, by New York Times writer Margalit Fox, tells one of the most intriguing stories in the history of language—the race to decipher ...
FastTFriend's insight:

At the center of this narrative is an American linguist, Alice Kober, whose major contribution to the decoding of the script is unknown to history because she died before she was able to make the final leap.

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Languages, Litanies, and the Limit

Languages, Litanies, and the Limit | cognition | Scoop.it
In this article, I explore Stephenson's use of mathematical objects and philosophies in his novel Anathem (2008).

Via Mariusz Leś
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Words, words, words | TED Playlists | TED

Words, words, words | TED Playlists | TED | cognition | Scoop.it
As Wittgenstein famously wrote, "The limits of my language means the limits of my world." Watch talks by linguists, data analysts and word nerds who explore the all-encompassing power of language.
FastTFriend's insight:
Including an interesting talk by John McWhorter: Txtng is killing language
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How Your Language Affects Your Wealth and Health: Scientific American

How Your Language Affects Your Wealth and Health: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
An international study suggests languages shape how we think about the future, and how we plan for it
FastTFriend's insight:

Chen’s recent findings suggest that an unlikely factor, language, strongly affects our future-oriented behavior. Some languages strongly distinguish the present and the future. Other languages only weakly distinguish the present and the future. Chen’s recent research suggests that people who speak languages that weakly distinguish the present and the future are better prepared for the future.

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FastTFriend's comment, March 23, 2013 5:46 AM
Language can move the future back and forth
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21 Emotions with No English Word Equivalents

21 Emotions with No English Word Equivalents | cognition | Scoop.it

Via Martin Daumiller
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Martin Daumiller's curator insight, January 18, 2013 6:26 AM

Design student Pei-Ying Lin took Parrot|s Classification of Human Emotions as a base and tried to add different emotions to it, which don't exist in English, but in other languages, such as Hebrew, Russian, German, Italian, Mandarin, etc.

She tried to express similarities and closeness to other emotions and managed to visualize the relationship between the foreign emotion-words and the English ones.

In Lins words, her project is one "that investigates human emotions and languages. By re-looking at how humans communicate, it searches for a way to connect our inner self and personal emotions, through the design of a personal language and several new ways of communication. It is an investigation of how language can be improvised to connect our emotions in this multilingual world."

This is a nice example and visualization of the culture-rootedness of emotions. It underlines the historical and social background necessary for the development of a certain set-of-mind required to feel and express specific emotions.

Sophie Martin's comment, March 13, 2013 7:30 PM
full size http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-01/emotions-which-there-are-no-english-words-infographic
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Texts and Tweets: Myths and Realities

Texts and Tweets: Myths and Realities | cognition | Scoop.it
Professor David Crystal, one of the world's leading linguistic experts, challenges the myth that new communication technologies are destroying language.
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Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain | cognition | Scoop.it
How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author Steven Pinker introduces you to linguistics, the evolution of spoken language, and the debate over the existence of an innate universal grammar.
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Alfred Korzybski - Historical Note on the Structural Differential

Alfred Korzybski talks about his famous model called the Structural Differential, which describes the human abstracting process. Edited by Steve Stockdale.
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Magazine, Science, Science and Technology | Riddled with irregularity | Prospect Magazine

Magazine, Science, Science and Technology | Riddled with irregularity | Prospect Magazine | cognition | Scoop.it

shared communication is needed to help organise category formation, so that categories and language co-evolve in an interaction between biological predisposition and culture.

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