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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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Blood of world's oldest woman hints at limits of life - health - 23 April 2014 - New Scientist

Blood of world's oldest woman hints at limits of life - health - 23 April 2014 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
She lived to 115, but a study of Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper's blood hints at factors limiting lifespan
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In van Andel-Schipper's case, it seemed that in the twilight of her life, about two-thirds of the white blood cells remaining in her body at death originated from just two stem cells, implying that most or all of the blood stem cells she started life with had already burned out and died.

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The Death of “Near Death”: Even If Heaven Is Real, You Aren’t Seeing It | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

The Death of “Near Death”: Even If Heaven Is Real, You Aren’t Seeing It | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | cognition | Scoop.it

Why would the brain react to death (or even imagined death) in such a way? Well, death is a scary thing. Scientific accounts of the NDE characterize it as the body’s psychological and physiological response mechanism to such fear, producing chemicals in the brain that calm the individual while inducing euphoric sensations to reduce trauma.

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Surrealist-Expressionist Mash-Up: Alfred Kubin, Decadents, Max Brod, Franz Blei, The First Hour After Death, and Last Drink Bird Head

Surrealist-Expressionist Mash-Up: Alfred Kubin, Decadents, Max Brod, Franz Blei, The First Hour After Death, and Last Drink Bird Head | cognition | Scoop.it
"The characteristic feature of this strange art is that it attempts to depict the extrasensory, to provide symbols for the mysterious forces to which we are subjected in our daily lives but which w...
FastTFriend's insight:

Thi s short "story" by Jeff Vandermeer, included in City of Saints and Madmen is a gem (as is the whole book).

 

"In the first hour after death, the room is so still that every sound holds a terrible clarity, like the tap of a knife against glass. The soft pad of shoes as someone walks away and closes the door is profoundly solid—each short footstep weighted, distinct. The body lies against the floor, the sightless eyes staring down into the wood as if some answer has been buried in the grain. The back of the head is mottled by the shadows of the trees that sway outside the open window. "

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Death: Why we should be grateful for it - life - 22 October 2012 - New Scientist

Death: Why we should be grateful for it - life - 22 October 2012 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it

DEATH gets a bad press. Invariably the unwelcome visitor, arriving too soon, he is feared and loathed: "the last enemy" in the words of the Bible.

But a few poets and philosophers throughout history have argued that without death we would be at a loss. It's the prospect of his coming that gets us out of bed in the morning and drives us to great deeds. Now a growing body of evidence from social psychology suggests that these thinkers are right. People might dream of a deathless civilisation, but without death, there would barely be a civilisation at all.

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