cognition
Follow
Find tag "consciousness"
8.4K views | +0 today
cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
Curated by FastTFriend
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

What is consciousness for? — Consciousness is a life-transforming illusion by Keith Frankish — Aeon Ideas

What is consciousness for?  — Consciousness is a life-transforming illusion by Keith Frankish — Aeon Ideas | cognition | Scoop.it
It appears, then, that the brain can do the work of perception without qualia. So, again, what is consciousness for? In his 2011 book Soul Dust, Humphrey proposes a novel idea. He argues that consciousness enriches life. It doesn’t add information; it adds interests and goals. Qualia are wonderful, magical things, and conscious creatures enjoy having them. They relish their sensations, and this relish gives them a deeper interest in their own existence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Why animals eat psychoactive plants

Why animals eat psychoactive plants | cognition | Scoop.it
Johann Hari, author of Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, learns about drunk elephants, the stoned water buffalo, and the grieving mongoose.
FastTFriend's insight:

Professor Siegel claims the desire to alter our consciousness is “the fourth drive” in all human minds, alongside the desire to eat, drink, and have sex—and it is “biologically inevitable.” It provides us with moments of release and relief.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast

Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast | cognition | Scoop.it
What is consciousness? A neuroscientist's new book argues that it arises when information is broadcast throughout the brain

Quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli expressed disdain for sloppy, nonsensical theories by denigrating them as “not even wrong,” meaning they were just empty conjectures that could be quickly dismissed. Unfortunately, many remarkably popular theories of consciousness are of this ilk—the idea, for instance, that our experiences can somehow be explained by the quantum theory that Pauli himself helped to formulate in the early 20th century. An even more far-fetched idea holds that consciousness emerged only a few thousand years ago, when humans realized that the voices in their head came not from the gods but from their own internal spoken narratives.

Not every theory of consciousness, however, can be dismissed as just so much intellectual flapdoodle. During the past several decades, two distinct frameworks for explaining what consciousness is and how the brain produces it have emerged, each compelling in its own way. Each framework seeks to explain a vast storehouse of observations from both neurological patients and sophisticated laboratory experiments.

 

keep on reading..


Via Wildcat2030
more...
Jose M Quiroz's curator insight, April 14, 2014 2:14 AM

just as this article emphasizes,  the consciousness is incredibly difficult to analyze. To be said is that we as humans are most likely to want an answer for what can't be answered yet; even if that requires implanting sensory devices in peoples skulls, and brains to discover what is yet to be answered. In this case it is a confusing material just as psychology is in great part gray area, indeed the conscious could be explained as the process of storing data to later be processed and used in the required way it is needed.

Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Consciousness & the Brain: John Searle at TEDxCERN

John Searle one of the world's great philosophers of mind and language, has spent fifty years stimulating thinking around the world. What he says about consc...
FastTFriend's insight:

John Searle one of the world's great philosophers of mind and language, has spent fifty years stimulating thinking around the world. What he says about consciousness as a biological phenomenon will challenge you! Cogitation, Consciousness & The Brain.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Julian Jaynes Collection | Edited by Marcel Kuijsten

The Julian Jaynes Collection | Edited by Marcel Kuijsten | cognition | Scoop.it
The Julian Jaynes Collection edited by Marcel Kuijsten
FastTFriend's insight:
Discussion of the life of Julian Jaynes.All of Jaynes's relevant articles and lectures for the first time gathered together in one volume.Previously unpublished lectures by Julian Jaynes, including "The Dream of Agamemnon," which extends his theory to dreams and the discovery of time, and "Imagination and the Dance of the Self," discussing the nature of the self, emotions, and the consequences of consciousness.Rare and previously unpublished radio and in-person interviews and in-depth question and answer sessions with Julian Jaynes discussing many aspects of his theory, including: the nature of consciousness, dreams, consciousness in children, cognition in animals, the discovery of time, the nature of the self, the mentality of tribes, emotions, art, music, poetry, prophecy, mental illness, therapy, the consequences and future of consciousness, brain hemisphere differences, vestiges of the bicameral mind, and much more. In these interviews and discussions, Jaynes addresses nearly every question one might have about his theory. This is the closest one could come to having a personal conversation with Julian Jaynes.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

There Is Only Awe-"There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,”Julian Jaynes

There Is Only Awe-"There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,”Julian Jaynes | cognition | Scoop.it

“There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,” he writes.

-

Julian Jaynes, a psychologist at Princeton, had little patience for his colleagues, who spent hours in the lab doing “petty, petty humdrum things.” He dismissed their “objective aridity,” “cunning lingo,” and “valiant nonsense.” The field of psychology, he wrote, was little more than “bad poetry disguised as science.” 

Jaynes published only one book, in 1976, The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, which tells the story of how mankind learned to think. Critics described it as a bizarre and reckless masterpiece—the American Journal of Psychiatry called Jaynes “as startling as Freud in the Interpretation of Dreams.” Drawing on evidence from neurology, archaeology, art history, theology, and Greek poetry, Jaynes captured the experience of modern consciousness—“a whole kingdom where each of us reigns reclusively alone, questioning what we will, commanding what we can”—as sensitively and tragically as any great novelist. 

 


Via Wildcat2030, Xaos
more...
Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 17, 2013 1:23 PM

"The origin of consciousness in the bicameral mind" by Julian Jaynes, is a must read!

Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The Future of Consciousness Part 1 of 7

An address delivered at an Institute of General Semantics symposium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, April 23, 2005...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

The smart unconscious

The smart unconscious | cognition | Scoop.it
We feel that we are in control when our brains figure out puzzles or read words, says Tom Stafford, but a new experiment shows just how much work is going on underneath the surface of our conscious minds.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Sign in to read: The fourth state of matter: Consciousness - opinion - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: The fourth state of matter: Consciousness - opinion - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

How consciousness works – Michael Graziano – Aeon

How consciousness works – Michael Graziano – Aeon | cognition | Scoop.it
Consciousness is the ‘hard problem’, the mystery that confounds science and philosophy. Has a new theory cracked it?
FastTFriend's insight:

Attention requires control. In the modern study of robotics there is something called control theory, and it teaches us that, if a machine such as a brain is to control something, it helps to have an internal model of that thing. Think of a military general with his model armies arrayed on a map: they provide a simple but useful representation — not always perfectly accurate, but close enough to help formulate strategy. Likewise, to control its own state of attention, the brain needs a constantly updated simulation or model of that state. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Consciousness: Why we need to build sentient machines - life - 25 May 2013 - New Scientist

FastTFriend's insight:

Trying to create a machine that experiences pain or colours in the same way that we do might require a radical rethink. Pentti Haikonen, an electrical engineer and philosopher at the University of Illinois in Springfield, believes that we will never create a feeling machine using software. Software is a language, he says, and so requires extra information to be interpreted. If you don't speak English, the words "pain" or "red", for instance, are meaningless. But if you see the colour red, that has meaning no matter what your language.

Most computers and robots created so far run on software. Even if they connect to a physical device, like a microphone, the input has to be translated into strings of 1s and 0s before it can be processed. "Numbers do not feel like anything and do not appear as red," says Haikonen. "That is where everything is lost."

Not so for Haikonen's robot. His machine, called XCR for experimental cognitive robot, stores and manipulates incoming sensory information, not via software, but through physical objects – in this case wires, resistors and diodes. "Red is red, pain is pain without any interpretation," says Haikonen. "They are direct experiences to the brain."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Julian Jaynes and the Bicameral Mind Theory

FastTFriend's insight:

Dustin Eirdosh Interviews the founder of the Julian Jaynes Society Marcel Kuijsten.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Boundaries of the Knowable

Boundaries of the Knowable | cognition | Scoop.it
In this 10 part series from The Open University, Professor Russell Stannard OBE delves into subjects ranging from free will and determinism, to space and t
more...
No comment yet.