cognition
Follow
Find tag "cognition"
8.4K views | +4 today
cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
Curated by FastTFriend
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

From the machine

From the machine | cognition | Scoop.it
A new film, Ex Machina, is released in the UK tomorrow and it is quite possibly one of the best sci-fi films of recent times and probably the best film about consciousness and artificial intelligence ever made.
FastTFriend's insight:

From article:

"This shifts the goalposts in a vital way. What matters is not whether Ava is a machine. It is not even whether Ava, even though a machine, can be conscious. What matters is whether Ava makes a conscious person feel that Ava is conscious. The brilliance of Ex Machina is that it reveals the Turing test for what it really is: a test of the human, not of the machine. And Garland is not necessarily on our side."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Is the Human Mind Unique?

Is the Human Mind Unique? | cognition | Scoop.it

Cognitive abilities often regarded as unique to humans include humor, morality, symbolism, creativity, and preoccupation with the minds of others. 

FastTFriend's insight:

In these compelling talks, emphasis is placed on the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether these attributes are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans.

Colin Renfrew (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) begins with the Archaeological Evidence for Mind, followed by Daniel Povinelli (Univ of Louisiana at Lafayette) on Desperately Seeking Explanation, and Patricia Churchland (UC San Diego) on Moral Sense.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

What Will Come After Language?

What Will Come After Language? | cognition | Scoop.it
h+ Magazine is a new publication that covers technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings in fundamental ways.
FastTFriend's insight:

I’m going to talk a bit about language, and how it relates to mind and reality … and about what may come AFTER language as we know it, when mind and reality change dramatically due to radical technological advances.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FastTFriend from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Brainy Trees, Metaphorical Forests: On Neuroscience, Embodiment, and Architecture | Neuroanthropology

Brainy Trees, Metaphorical Forests: On Neuroscience, Embodiment, and Architecture | Neuroanthropology | cognition | Scoop.it

Inspiration and interpretation are inevitable. As metaphor is basic to what we do, so emerging results in neuroscience will be taken well beyond the intentions and even meanings of their authors. Much caution and critique will be needed. Yet at the same time, I want to preserve a space for this other mantle, from science to art and humanism. To creation and design and expression.

 

A revolution based on neuroscience? No. A recognition of our bodies and experiences and senses? Yes. And thus much closer to metaphors that inspire us every day. Like HOME or WARMTH. And maybe even a tree or two.


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Constructing Religion without The Social: Durkheim, Latour, and Extended Cognition

Constructing Religion without The Social: Durkheim, Latour, and Extended Cognition | cognition | Scoop.it
Here is the intro to Matthew's article: Where does thinking happen? The obvious and most common answer is “somewhere inside the head.” After all, this is where the brain is safely housed behind sev...
FastTFriend's insight:

So, in what follows, I am prepared to sin boldly and specify how an appreciation for the cognitive phenomenon of extended mind could transform the academic study of religion. In the first section I examine what is perhaps the first and most influential externalist account of religion: Emile Durkheim’s Elementary Forms of the Religious Life ([1912] 1995). I draw attention to his strategy for anchoring the categories of human cognition in the material practices of a given society. In the next section I turn to another French sociologist, Bruno Latour, in the hopes of finding a theoretical conversation partner who can help me out of my predicament. I review Latour’s ongoing attempt to displace the metaphysical assumptions that have been an essential and worrying feature of the social category since Durkheim. In the third section I emphasize how Latour explicitly invokes models of situated and extended cognition to make sense of how collectives and agents are constructed without appeals to the social. In the final section I propose two ways in which the portrait of distributed, embodied, and embedded cognition—aided by a generous amount of prodding from Latour’s project—may reorient the study of religion in fruitful ways.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

RSA Animate - The Power of Outrospection

Introspection is out, and outrospection is in. Philosopher and author Roman Krznaric explains how we can help drive social change by stepping outside ourselv...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Embodied Cognition: Our Inner Imaginings of the World around Us Make Us Who We Are [Excerpt]: Scientific American

Embodied Cognition: Our Inner Imaginings of the World around Us Make Us Who We Are [Excerpt]: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Cognitive scientist Benjamin K.Bergen’s Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning recounts that the parts of the brain engaged when throwing a baseball also fire up when visualizing the same action...
FastTFriend's insight:

Editor's note: This excerpt of a chapter from Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning by Benjamin K. Bergen (Basic Books, 2012)  relates that our brain’s capacity to both perceive a pig and then imagine what the animal is like, even one that flies, points to an essential cognitive skill that makes humans different from all other species.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FastTFriend
Scoop.it!

Neurologist Probes the Mind for Clues to End Conflicts: Scientific American

Neurologist Probes the Mind for Clues to End Conflicts: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Could neuroscience hold the key to breaking down psychological barriers between groups in conflict?
more...
No comment yet.