cognition
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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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Virtual body double gets ill so you don't have to - tech - 28 February 2013 - New Scientist

Virtual body double gets ill so you don't have to - tech - 28 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
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PLOS ONE: Phylomemetic Patterns in Science Evolution—The Rise and Fall of Scientific Fields

PLOS ONE: Phylomemetic Patterns in Science Evolution—The Rise and Fall of Scientific Fields | cognition | Scoop.it

Abstract : "We introduce an automated method for the bottom-up reconstruction of the cognitive evolution of science, based on big-data issued from digital libraries, and modeled as lineage relationships between scientific fields. We refer to these dynamic structures as phylomemetic networks or phylomemies, by analogy with biological evolution; and we show that they exhibit strong regularities, with clearly identifiable phylomemetic patterns. Some structural properties of the scientific fields - in particular their density -, which are defined independently of the phylomemy reconstruction, are clearly correlated with their status and their fate in the phylomemy (like their age or their short term survival). Within the framework of a quantitative epistemology, this approach raises the question of predictibility for science evolution, and sketches a prototypical life cycle of the scientific fields: an increase of their cohesion after their emergence, the renewal of their conceptual background through branching or merging events, before decaying when their density is getting too low."


Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
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Step Inside the Real World of Compulsive Hoarders: Scientific American

Step Inside the Real World of Compulsive Hoarders: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Recent research has changed the way clinicians treat hoarding as well as refuted popular assumptions about people with excessive clutter
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Hoarders tend to organize the world spatially and visually, rather than categorically. Instead of putting a new electricity bill in a designated folder, for example, a hoarder might slip the bill on top of a particular pile of stuff, committing to memory a visual map of its location. In this way, many hoarders can look at their piles of stuff and know exactly what they contain—although the larger and more jumbled the heaps become, the more difficult it is to keep track of individual items. Many compulsive hoarders have difficulty categorizing their possessions—believing that each item is too unique to lump with others—even though they have no trouble classifying objects they do not own.

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The Evolution of Purposes

The Evolution of Purposes | cognition | Scoop.it
Before there was life on Earth, there were no purposes, no reasons. Things just happened. How could purposes emerge from such purposeless conditions? Looki
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The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
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Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

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Twitter / SusanBrdfrdArt: "Artists don't make objects. ...

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New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory May Be Good for You: Scientific American

New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory May Be Good for You: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
What swinging couples and committed polyamorists can teach monogamists about love
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Take jealousy. If you ask most people how they'd feel if their partner had sex with or fell in love with someone else, the responses would be pretty negative: fear, anger, jealousy, rejection. Ask a polyamorous person the same question, and they're more likely to tell you they'd be thrilled. It's a concept called "compersion," which means the joy felt when a partner discovers love outside of you. It's similar to the feeling the typical person might get after finding out their best friend scored her dream job, Holmes said. But in this case, the happiness stems from a lover's external relationships.

That finding challenges much of what traditional psychological research has established about how jealousy works.

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James B. Glattfelder: Who controls the world? | Video on TED.com

James Glattfelder studies complexity: how an interconnected system -- say, a swarm of birds -- is more than the sum of its parts. And complexity theory, it turns out, can reveal a lot about how the economy works.
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James B. Glattfelder aims to give us a richer, data-driven understanding of the people and interactions that control our global economy. He does this not to push an ideology -- but with the hopes of making the world a better place.

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The Joy of Fungal Sex: Penicillin Mold Can Reproduce Sexually, Which Could Lead to Better Antibiotics: Scientific American

The Joy of Fungal Sex: Penicillin Mold Can Reproduce Sexually, Which Could Lead to Better Antibiotics: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Penicillin-producing fungus, previously thought to be asexual, has a sexual side. The finding is the latest in a kind of sexual revolution in fungal genetics
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Paul Dyer, a fungal biologist at the University of Nottingham in England, suspected that P. chrysogenum would reproduce sexually if given the right encouragement. Acomplete sequencing of the fungi's genome revealed that P. chyrosogenum still carried the genes needed for mating. "That told us that there was perhaps sexual compatibility there," he says. So Dyer and researchers at several other European institutions tried to find the ideal conditions that would encourage P.chrysogenum to have sex.


Furthermore, the researchers discovered that the genes that regulate the fungi's sexual ability also control the amount of penicillin it produces; the fungi that are having sex make more penicillin. The team published their findings online in January in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "I've believed for a long time that these guys were having sex but they were just doing it in secret," says Joan W. Bennett, a professor of plant biology and pathology at Rutgers University, who was not involved in the work.

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The Thrilling Potential of SixthSense Technology

The Thrilling Potential of SixthSense Technology | cognition | Scoop.it
Pranav Mistry demos several tools that help the physical world interact with the world of data - including a deep look at his SixthSense device and a new,
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The projector projects visual information enabling surfaces, walls and physical objects around us to be used as interfaces; while the camera recognizes and tracks users’ hand gestures and physical objects using computer-vision based techniques.

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Sign in to read: Mind maths: The elements of thought - 06 February 2013 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: Mind maths: The elements of thought - 06 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
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Five laws to rule them all...

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Lee Cronin: Print your own medicine | Video on TED.com

Chemist Lee Cronin is working on a 3D printer that, instead of objects, is able to print molecules. An exciting potential long-term application: printing your own medicine using chemical inks.
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A professor of chemistry, nanoscience and chemical complexity, Lee Cronin and his research group investigate how chemistry can revolutionize modern technology and even create life.

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Why Humans Like to Cry: Scientific American

Why Humans Like to Cry: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
The anguished tear, a British scientist argues in a new book, is what makes us uniquely human
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If it is the case that only humans cry emotionally, then there must have been a time in human evolution when tears took on an additional meaning to their hitherto biological functions , namely as a signal of distress, and a cipher for suffering. In my book I discuss at when in the past our ancestors may come to possess this trait. I suggest that this is connected with the dawning of self-consciousness, with the development of theory of mind, and the realisation that the self and others can disappear.

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New Study Shows That Unique Brain Structures Found In Humans Differ From Ancestral Primates Due To Evolution

New Study Shows That Unique Brain Structures Found In Humans Differ From Ancestral Primates Due To Evolution | cognition | Scoop.it
New research shows that the human brain is more unique than we think.

Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
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Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American

Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Dwayne Godwin is a neuroscientist at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Jorge Cham draws the comic strip Piled Higher and Deeper at www.phdcomics.com .
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A short informing take

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Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American

Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is a teachable skill best taught outside the K–12 classroom
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Museums and other institutions of informal learning may be better suited to teach this skill than elementary and secondary schools. At the Exploratorium in San Francisco, we recently studied how learning to ask good questions can affect the quality of people's scientific inquiry. We found that when we taught participants to ask “What if?” and “How can?” questions that nobody present would know the answer to and that would spark exploration, they engaged in better inquiry at the next exhibit—asking more questions, performing more experiments and making better interpretations of their results. Specifically, their questions became more comprehensive at the new exhibit. Rather than merely asking about something they wanted to try (“What happens when you block out a magnet?”), they tended to include both cause and effect in their question (“What if we pull this one magnet out and see if the other ones move by the same amount?”). Asking juicy questions appears to be a transferable skill for deepening collaborative inquiry into the science content found in exhibits.

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22-Year-Old's Incredibly Artistic Self-Portraits

22-Year-Old's Incredibly Artistic Self-Portraits | cognition | Scoop.it

Though Budapest, Hungary-based photographer Noell S. Oszvald currently has only 22 total photos on her Flickr page, they're all so incredibly powerf…


Via Mohir
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ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org

ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
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I'm interested in how the languages we speak shape the way we think. The reason I got interested in this question is that languages differ from one another so much. There are about 7,000 languages around the world, and each one differs from the next in innumerable ways. Obviously, languages have different words, but they also require very different things from their speakers grammatically.

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Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL.mp4

Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL on Feb 5, 2013 www.pleasemishandle.com/videos/

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Wildcat: Archeodatalogy Entwined Enmeshed Entangled

Wildcat: Archeodatalogy Entwined Enmeshed Entangled | cognition | Scoop.it
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The cyborg existentialism is a new domain of relationality residing between the tribal homophily and hyperconnected heterophily.
The cyborg existentialism (CE) is a fresh approach to ‘freedom’ as the ultimate ground of human beings' capacity to relate to the world, extended and enhanced in the world via technology.

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Antifragile

Antifragile | cognition | Scoop.it
In The Black Swan, Taleb showed that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. In his new book Antifragile, he
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At the RSA, Nassim Taleb will show how the antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events, and will consider a number of critical questions, such as: why is the city-state better than the nation-state; why is debt bad for you; why is what we call “efficient” not efficient at all; and why do government responses and social policies protect the strong and hurt the weak?

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Warm Weather Makes It Hard to Think Straight: Scientific American

Warm Weather Makes It Hard to Think Straight: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
How temperature shapes difficult decisions
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 Recent research suggests that warm weather impairs our ability to make complex decisions—and even causes us to shy away from making these decisions in the first place.

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The Evolution of Religion

The Evolution of Religion | cognition | Scoop.it
The guests are the authors of two innovative books on the subject. "In The Faith Instinct"'s Nicholas Wade of the New York Times examines the scientific ev
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Taking a perspective rooted in evolutionary biology with a focus on brain science, they elucidate the perennial questions about religion: What is its purpose? How did it arise? What is its source? Why does every known culture have some form of it?

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Watson's medical expertise offered commercially

Watson's medical expertise offered commercially | cognition | Scoop.it
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Dr. Watson is accepting new patients.
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In both applications, doctors or insurance company workers will access Watson through a tablet or computer. Watson will quickly compare a patient's medical records to what it has learned and make several recommendations in decreasing order of confidence.

In the cancer program, the computer will be considering what treatment is most likely to succeed. In the insurance program, it will consider what treatment should be authorized for payment.

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Sleep and dreaming: Where do our minds go at night? - life - 05 February 2013 - New Scientist

We are beginning to understand how our brains shape our dreams, and why they contain such an eerie mixture of the familiar and the bizarre

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FastTFriend's comment, February 7, 2013 3:36 AM
And, inspired to look into it by her own son's gaming, Jayne Gackenbach at Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton, Canada, has found that players are beginning to report a greater sense of control over their dreams, with the feeling that they are active participants inside a virtual reality. She points out that gamers are more likely to try to fight back when they dream of being pursued by an enemy, for instance. Ironically, this interaction seems to make their dreams less scary and more exciting. "They say things like - 'this was a nightmare, but it was awesome'. They are invigorated by it," Gackenbach says.