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cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting stuff
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The uncertain dance of the spoken word

The uncertain dance of the spoken word | cognition | Scoop.it
Stanford Magazine has a wonderful article by a writer who relies on lip-reading and experiences speech through this subtle movement-based language.
Rachel Kolb skilfully describes how this works, and more importantly, feels.
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The history of the birth of neuroculture

The history of the birth of neuroculture | cognition | Scoop.it
My recent Observer piece examined how neuroscience has saturated popular culture but the story of how we found ourselves living in a ‘neuroculture’ is itself quite fascinating.
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Truth and Trust: Maturana and Von Foerster

The first of a series of three 30 minute videos produced by the American Society for Cybernetics and Change Management Systems, directed by Pille Bunnell, 19...
FastTFriend's insight:

This one is about Science and Reality.

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What’s Wrong with the Brain Activity Map Proposal: Scientific American

What’s Wrong with the Brain Activity Map Proposal: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
With the president suggesting a multibillion-dollar neuroscience effort, a leading neuroscientist explains the deep conceptual problems with plans to record all the brain's neurons
FastTFriend's insight:

Very interesting take on big project Brain Mapping:


As we enter the era of Big Brain Science projects, it is important to know where the next firm foothold is.

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Ramez Naam - Infinite Resource, Graduate Studies Program 2012

Learn more at Singularityu.org In this video, Ramez Naam summarizes the pain points his new book 'The Infinite Resource' addresses. For the full lecture, bec...
FastTFriend's insight:

In this remarkable book, Ramez Naam charts a course to supercharge innovation -- by changing the rules of our economy -- that will lead the whole world to greater wealth and human well-being, even as we dodge looming resource crunches and reduce our impact on the planet.

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Why the mind is not in the head

Why the mind is not in the head | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

Though written almost 20 years ago, still beautifully put:

 

"Slowly the cards turned into considering that the basis of mind is the body in coupled action, that is, the sensory-motor circuits establish the organism as viable in situated contexts. Form this perspective the brain appears as a dynamical process (and not a syntactic one) of real time variables with a rich self-organizing capacity (and not a representational machinery). So in this sense the mind is not in the head since it is roots in the body as a whole and also in the extended environment where the organism finds itself.
Beyond embodied enaction, recent work with young children and monkeys (1995-) has re-discovered the profound importance of the coupling with other conspecifics. This means that the constitution of a mind is always concurrent with the extended presence of other minds in a network. Thus, beyond embodied enaction there is also generative enaction, a trend that points to the beginnings of a science or interbeing, the future for a proper understanding of the necessary unity of mind and nature."

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The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity

The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity | cognition | Scoop.it
"Generating interesting connections between disparate subjects is what makes art so fascinating to create and to view . . . we are forced to

Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
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New Study Shows That Unique Brain Structures Found In Humans Differ From Ancestral Primates Due To Evolution

New Study Shows That Unique Brain Structures Found In Humans Differ From Ancestral Primates Due To Evolution | cognition | Scoop.it
New research shows that the human brain is more unique than we think.

Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
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Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American

Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Dwayne Godwin is a neuroscientist at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Jorge Cham draws the comic strip Piled Higher and Deeper at www.phdcomics.com .
FastTFriend's insight:

A short informing take

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Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American

Critical Thinking Is Best Taught Outside the Classroom: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is a teachable skill best taught outside the K–12 classroom
FastTFriend's insight:

Museums and other institutions of informal learning may be better suited to teach this skill than elementary and secondary schools. At the Exploratorium in San Francisco, we recently studied how learning to ask good questions can affect the quality of people's scientific inquiry. We found that when we taught participants to ask “What if?” and “How can?” questions that nobody present would know the answer to and that would spark exploration, they engaged in better inquiry at the next exhibit—asking more questions, performing more experiments and making better interpretations of their results. Specifically, their questions became more comprehensive at the new exhibit. Rather than merely asking about something they wanted to try (“What happens when you block out a magnet?”), they tended to include both cause and effect in their question (“What if we pull this one magnet out and see if the other ones move by the same amount?”). Asking juicy questions appears to be a transferable skill for deepening collaborative inquiry into the science content found in exhibits.

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22-Year-Old's Incredibly Artistic Self-Portraits

22-Year-Old's Incredibly Artistic Self-Portraits | cognition | Scoop.it

Though Budapest, Hungary-based photographer Noell S. Oszvald currently has only 22 total photos on her Flickr page, they're all so incredibly powerf…


Via Mohir
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ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org

ENCAPSULATED UNIVERSES | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

I'm interested in how the languages we speak shape the way we think. The reason I got interested in this question is that languages differ from one another so much. There are about 7,000 languages around the world, and each one differs from the next in innumerable ways. Obviously, languages have different words, but they also require very different things from their speakers grammatically.

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Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL.mp4

Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL on Feb 5, 2013 www.pleasemishandle.com/videos/

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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The essence of intelligence is feedback

The essence of intelligence is feedback | cognition | Scoop.it
Here’s last week’s BBC Future column. The original is here, where it was called “Why our brains love feedback”.
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Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela’ Contribution to Media Ecology: Autopoiesis, The Santiago School of Cognition, an Enactive Cognitive Science

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Dr. Peter H. Diamandis — We are evolving into meta-intelligence group-minds

Dr. Peter H. Diamandis -- Physician, entrepreneur, founder and chairman of the X PRIZE Foundation. Author of Abundance http://GF2045.com/...


Via The Asymptotic Leap, Spaceweaver
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George Por's comment, March 9, 2013 6:53 AM
This video is one of the pitch vids for the Global Future 2045 conference. Project Avatar, Android robotics, Anthropomorphic telepresence, Neuroscience, Mind theory, Neuroengineering, Brain-Computer Interfaces, Neuroprosthetics, Neurotransplantation, Long-range forecasting, Future evolution strategy, Evolutionary transhumanism, Ethics, Bionic prostheses, Cybernetic life-extension, Mid-century Singularity, Neo-humanity, Meta-intelligence, Cybernetic immortality, Consciousness, Spiritual development, Science and Spirituality.
George Por's comment, March 9, 2013 6:53 AM
This video is one of the pitch vids for the Global Future 2045 conference. Project Avatar, Android robotics, Anthropomorphic telepresence, Neuroscience, Mind theory, Neuroengineering, Brain-Computer Interfaces, Neuroprosthetics, Neurotransplantation, Long-range forecasting, Future evolution strategy, Evolutionary transhumanism, Ethics, Bionic prostheses, Cybernetic life-extension, Mid-century Singularity, Neo-humanity, Meta-intelligence, Cybernetic immortality, Consciousness, Spiritual development, Science and Spirituality.
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Is Cocoa the Brain Drug of the Future?: Scientific American

Is Cocoa the Brain Drug of the Future?: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Cognition-Boosting Compounds

It's news chocolate lovers have been craving: raw cocoa may be packed with brain-boosting compounds.
FastTFriend's insight:

Exactly how cocoa causes these changes is still unknown, but emerging research points to one flavanol in particular: (-)-epicatechin, pronounced “minus epicatechin.” Its name signifies its structure, differentiating it from other catechins, organic compounds highly abundant in cocoa and present in apples, wine and tea. The graph below shows how (-)-epicatechin fits into the world of brain-altering food molecules. Other studies suggest that the compound supports increased circulation and the growth of blood vessels, which could explain improvements in cognition, because better blood flow would bring the brain more oxygen and improve its function.

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Was Wittgenstein Right?

Was Wittgenstein Right? | cognition | Scoop.it
The man who insisted that Western philosophy was based in confusion and wishful thinking is not a popular one among philosophers. But he should not be dismissed.
FastTFriend's insight:

Insightful in writing (from "The Blue Book"):

 

Our craving for generality has [as one] source … our preoccupation with the method of science. I mean the method of reducing the explanation of natural phenomena to the smallest possible number of primitive natural laws; and, in mathematics, of unifying the treatment of different topics by using a generalization. Philosophers constantly see the method of science before their eyes, and are irresistibly tempted to ask and answer in the way science does. This tendency is the real source of metaphysics, and leads the philosopher into complete darkness. I want to say here that it can never be our job to reduce anything to anything, or to explain anything. Philosophy really is “purely descriptive.

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The nature of collective intelligence

The nature of collective intelligence | cognition | Scoop.it

Presentation by Pierre Levy


Via Viktor Markowski
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 2, 2013 11:57 AM

45 minute video presentation supported by slides on the nature of collective intelligence and the philosophical and technical construct behind the next level of the internet as a global mind.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:15 PM

Pierre Levy, c´est toujours très intéressant!

Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 18, 2013 2:32 PM

Pierre Lévy invented IEML; think semantic web

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Virtual body double gets ill so you don't have to - tech - 28 February 2013 - New Scientist

Virtual body double gets ill so you don't have to - tech - 28 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
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PLOS ONE: Phylomemetic Patterns in Science Evolution—The Rise and Fall of Scientific Fields

PLOS ONE: Phylomemetic Patterns in Science Evolution—The Rise and Fall of Scientific Fields | cognition | Scoop.it

Abstract : "We introduce an automated method for the bottom-up reconstruction of the cognitive evolution of science, based on big-data issued from digital libraries, and modeled as lineage relationships between scientific fields. We refer to these dynamic structures as phylomemetic networks or phylomemies, by analogy with biological evolution; and we show that they exhibit strong regularities, with clearly identifiable phylomemetic patterns. Some structural properties of the scientific fields - in particular their density -, which are defined independently of the phylomemy reconstruction, are clearly correlated with their status and their fate in the phylomemy (like their age or their short term survival). Within the framework of a quantitative epistemology, this approach raises the question of predictibility for science evolution, and sketches a prototypical life cycle of the scientific fields: an increase of their cohesion after their emergence, the renewal of their conceptual background through branching or merging events, before decaying when their density is getting too low."


Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts)
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Step Inside the Real World of Compulsive Hoarders: Scientific American

Step Inside the Real World of Compulsive Hoarders: Scientific American | cognition | Scoop.it
Recent research has changed the way clinicians treat hoarding as well as refuted popular assumptions about people with excessive clutter
FastTFriend's insight:

Hoarders tend to organize the world spatially and visually, rather than categorically. Instead of putting a new electricity bill in a designated folder, for example, a hoarder might slip the bill on top of a particular pile of stuff, committing to memory a visual map of its location. In this way, many hoarders can look at their piles of stuff and know exactly what they contain—although the larger and more jumbled the heaps become, the more difficult it is to keep track of individual items. Many compulsive hoarders have difficulty categorizing their possessions—believing that each item is too unique to lump with others—even though they have no trouble classifying objects they do not own.

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The Evolution of Purposes

The Evolution of Purposes | cognition | Scoop.it
Before there was life on Earth, there were no purposes, no reasons. Things just happened. How could purposes emerge from such purposeless conditions? Looki
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The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

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Twitter / SusanBrdfrdArt: "Artists don't make objects. ...

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