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The nature of collective intelligence

The nature of collective intelligence | cognition | Scoop.it

Presentation by Pierre Levy


Via Viktor Markowski
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 2, 2013 8:57 AM

45 minute video presentation supported by slides on the nature of collective intelligence and the philosophical and technical construct behind the next level of the internet as a global mind.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 22, 2013 11:15 AM

Pierre Levy, c´est toujours très intéressant!

Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:32 AM

Pierre Lévy invented IEML; think semantic web

cognition
How it evolved, what we do with it, futures; And otherwise interesting trends
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A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious | Science | WIRED

A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious | Science | WIRED | cognition | Scoop.it
It's a question that's perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he has an answer.

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Sam Harris's Vanishing Self

Sam Harris's Vanishing Self | cognition | Scoop.it
The well-known New Atheist makes a case for the value of “spirituality,” which he bases on his experiences in meditation.

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Duck Sex, Aesthetic Evolution, and the Origin of Beauty | Edge.org

Duck Sex, Aesthetic Evolution, and the Origin of Beauty | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

we need to structure evolutionary biology to recognize the aesthetic, recognize the subjective experience

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A torrent of accidental poems

A torrent of accidental poems | cognition | Scoop.it
Neurology journal Neurocase has an interesting study of a women who started compulsively writing poetry after having brief epileptic amnesia treated with the anti-seizure drug lamotrigine.
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Internet Archive – a short film about accessing knowledge – Aeon

Internet Archive – a short film about accessing knowledge – Aeon | cognition | Scoop.it
In this 13-minute documentary, Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive, describes his vision for universal access to all knowledge.
FastTFriend's insight:

‘The best way to preserve things is to make them accessible,’ he says, going on to note that the big experiment of giving everything away is proving effective.

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Children with autism have extra synapses in brain

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain | cognition | Scoop.it
Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain 'pruning' process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Because synapses are the points where neurons ...

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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, August 22, 1:52 AM

Very interesting.

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“Don’t Read Books!” A 12th-Century Zen Poem

“Don’t Read Books!” A 12th-Century Zen Poem | cognition | Scoop.it
"It's annoying for others to have to hear you."

We live in a culture that often romanticizes books as the tender and exhilarating love-ma
FastTFriend's insight:

From text:

Don’t read books!
Don’t chant poems!
When you read books your eyeballs wither away
leaving the bare sockets.
When you chant poems your heart leaks out slowly
with each word.

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Conference; Art and the New Biology of the Mind, Antonio Damasio - YouTube

March 24, 2006 Antonio Damasio, the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience and Director of The Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern Calif...

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Humanity's cultural history captured in 5-minute film

Humanity's cultural history captured in 5-minute film | cognition | Scoop.it
Video map of births and deaths shows rise and fall of cultural centres.

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Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes

Carl G. Jung’s Synchronicity and Quantum Entanglement: Schrodinger’s Cat ‘Wanders’ Between Chromosomes | cognition | Scoop.it
One of the most prospective directions of study of C.G. Jung’s synchronicity phenomenon is reviewed considering the latest achievements of modern science.

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Sarah Clarke's curator insight, August 2, 10:47 AM

I would relish it if synchronicity was proven to be a by product of quantum activity.  As a psych tested logic fiend I have never been able to shake the sense that there are links beneath the surface of days that peek through to shock or delight every now and then.

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The Way We Live Our Lives in Stories | Edge.org

The Way We Live Our Lives in Stories | Edge.org | cognition | Scoop.it
FastTFriend's insight:

We live in stories all day long—fiction stories, novels, TV shows, films, interactive video games. We daydream in stories all day long. Estimates suggest we just do this for hours and hours per day—making up these little fantasies in our heads, these little fictions in our heads. We go to sleep at night to rest; the body rests, but not the brain. The brain stays up at night. What is it doing? It's telling itself stories for about two hours per night. It's eight or ten years out of our lifetime composing these little vivid stories in the theaters of our minds.


/// Why are stories so trouble-focused? You have quite a bit of convergence among scholars and scientists who are looking at this from an evolutionary point of view, and what they're saying is that stories may function as kind of virtual reality simulators, where you go and you simulate the big problems of human life, and you enjoy it, but you're having a mental training session at the same time. There's some kind of interesting evidence for this, that these simulations might help people perform better on certain tasks.

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Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com

Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com | cognition | Scoop.it
Your ancestors' lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 31, 6:22 AM

the science of epigenetics and the passing down of environmental memories (scarcity/ stress) down the generations!

Emanuela Russo's curator insight, August 14, 4:45 AM

Le esperienze e le vicissitudini dei tuoi antenati potrebbero influenzare e cambiare la tua personalità. 

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The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition

The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition | cognition | Scoop.it
Michael Tomasello argues that the roots of the human capacity for symbol-based culture, and the kind of psychological development that takes place within it, are based in a cluster of uniquely human cognitive capacities that emerge early in human...

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In Her 'Self-Portraits with Men & Woman' Photographer Dita Pepe Seamlessly Integrates into the Lives of Others

In Her 'Self-Portraits with Men & Woman' Photographer Dita Pepe Seamlessly Integrates into the Lives of Others | cognition | Scoop.it
When meeting somebody for the first time, or maybe just viewing a portrait, the brain goes into overdrive for a few seconds to quickly form a first impression. Whether we like it or not, rapid assumptions are made based on age, gender, race, culture, physical appearance, the su
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The Future Chronicles - State of the future

The Future Chronicles - State of the future | cognition | Scoop.it
THE FUTURE CHRONICLES is the first and only future magazine that literally travels through time: Every issue deals with a new topic of social change.
FastTFriend's insight:

That's why setting the topic for our first issue was a no-brainer for us: Our first journey should take us into the future of the internet!
So we started collecting all these opinions, hopes, fears, upcoming trends, technologies and innovations that are related to the good old World Wide Web and tried to get everything into a sensible order. But at that time we began to realize that something was missing...

The future is not enough

 

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Round trip ticket to the science of psychedelics

Round trip ticket to the science of psychedelics | cognition | Scoop.it
The latest edition of The Psychologist is a special open-access issue on the science and social impact of hallucinogenic drugs.
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Can young blood stem the ravages of old age? – Jess Zimmerman – Aeon

Can young blood stem the ravages of old age? – Jess Zimmerman – Aeon | cognition | Scoop.it
From teen-targeting vampires to Lady Báthory’s bloodbaths, we love stories of stolen youth. What if it were possible?
FastTFriend's insight:

In his lab at UCSF and his postdoc lab at Stanford, Villeda and colleagues injected old mice with blood plasma from young mice, and vice versa. They found that the senescent rodents learned quicker and grew more neurons after infusions from young blood, while the juvenile mice got correspondingly worse at learning new tricks. 

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The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense

The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense | cognition | Scoop.it
Created by Crispian Jago over at The Reason Stick, The Periodic Table of Irrational Nonsense attempts to rationalize the irrational. Great success? (click it to see a larger version)      

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, August 21, 5:20 AM

Great summarising list of the many things that done to fool us.

Click on the enlarged version so you can actually read it.

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A Magna Carta for the web

A Magna Carta for the web | cognition | Scoop.it

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?

 

http://on.ted.com/h0Pgm


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Researchers discover sense of 'cuteness' is innate -- here's what it looks like

Researchers discover sense of 'cuteness' is innate -- here's what it looks like | cognition | Scoop.it
I dare you to try and look away.

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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, August 14, 10:45 PM

Look at that hamster on a swing. It’s adorable. It doesn’t matter what you think of Obamacare.

Mike Lewis's curator insight, August 15, 7:03 AM

Can you tell the differences?

 

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Seeing ourselves through the eyes of the machine

Seeing ourselves through the eyes of the machine | cognition | Scoop.it
I’ve got an article in The Observer about how our inventions have profoundly shaped how we view ourselves because we’ve traditionally looked to technology for metaphors of human nature.
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Ambient Genius - The New Yorker

Ambient Genius - The New Yorker | cognition | Scoop.it
In January, 1975, the musician Brian Eno and the painter Peter Schmidt released a set of flash cards they called “Oblique Strategies.” Friends since meeting at art school, in the late sixties, they had long shared guidelines that could pry apart an intellectual logjam, providing options when they couldn’t figure out how to move forward. The first edition consisted of a hundred and fifteen cards. They were black on one side with an aphorism or an instruction printed on the reverse. Eno’s first rule was “Honour thy error as a hidden intention.” Others included “Use non-musicians” and “Tape your mouth.” In “Brian Eno: Visual Music,” a monograph of his musical projects and visual art, Eno, who still uses the rules, says, “ ‘Oblique Strategies’ evolved from me being in a number of working situations when the panic of the situation—particularly in studios—tended to make me quickly forget that there were other ways of working and that there were tangential ways of attacking problems that were in many senses more interesting than the direct head-on approach.”

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Ken Schneider's curator insight, August 13, 9:29 AM

Creative Arts have a lot to teach business about problem solving. Creative genius is an event not an attribute but hopefully if it occurs more than once a career it becomes hallmark. KS

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Why pay-what-you-want pricing may not be as crazy as it seems

Why pay-what-you-want pricing may not be as crazy as it seems | cognition | Scoop.it

Imagine you are about to check out from your overnight stay at a hotel in Paris. You get to the counter and the receptionist smiles and asks “how much would you like to pay?”

Say what? A hotel where you can choose to pay what you want?

It’s not a dream. It’s happening right now in Paris where a group of hotels allow you to book one of their rooms and pay only what you think the stay was worth.

Is this risky business? Surely people will jump at the opportunity to short change the hotel, paying much less that the standard rate. After all, we all love getting stuff for free.

Well it’s probably not as risky for the hotel as it first appears. Availability is limited to a set number of rooms and the interest the promotion has generated will probably outweigh any margin they lose on the standard rate. But more importantly, behavioural economics suggests that most guests will probably pay a fair amount anyway.


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Free Will May Just Be the Brain's 'Background Noise,' Scientists Say

Free Will May Just Be the Brain's 'Background Noise,' Scientists Say | cognition | Scoop.it
Free will may emerge from random background noise in the brain, new research suggests.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, June 19, 7:05 PM

Just like DMN appeared as important resting state activity in fMRI; I believe analysis of resting state firing rates / noise will add much to our understanding.

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How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin? | cognition | Scoop.it
In the great mythological narrative of Homer's Odyssey, the hero lands on the island of Sicily, the home of a race of one-eyed monsters, the Cyclopes. Finding a cave filled with a flock of sheep, the hero and his men feast on one of the animals until they are rudely interrupted by the cave's furious owner. The Cyclops Polyphemus vents his anger by eating a couple of the intruders before blocking the cave's entrance with a giant boulder.

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